Whakatauki listening


  • Ruia te taitea, ka tu taikaka anake: shake off the old, to reveal the new
  • Listening to the People of the Land
  • Te Reo Whakataukī and Growth Mindset (Freebie)
  • Māori Proverbs = Whakataukī
  • Ruia te taitea, ka tu taikaka anake: shake off the old, to reveal the new

    They are commonly used as inspirations in speeches and also as gentle reminders spoken to each other in everyday life. They are poetic expressions of wise sayings which allude to symbols native to Aotearoa.

    These proverbs also refer to significant historical events such as Waitangi and ANZAC Day and universal viewpoints on compassion , community , environment , and even food! They contain underlying messages which are greatly important to the Maori community. They are open to a lot of interpretations depending on the person who read or heard it. Also, it improves your proficiency in te reo Maori especially when you succeed in translating them to English. Furthermore, they will greatly impact your life.

    You will surely remember these proverbs once you see a mountain, a forest, bird or any object referenced in them. These allusions make them easy to remember because of the imagery they contain. These are ones that can help you integrate Growth Mindset with your tamariki. We are often discouraged whenever we face trials and challenges in our lives. We become weak and insecure. We reach the point when we just want to give up.

    However, take heart. Failures are ingredients to success. You have to learn from them. What do you want to do? What makes you happy? What are your dreams and aspirations in life? The sky is the limit and the world is yours. All you have to do is dream and persevere. Make the most out of all the opportunities the world has to offer! When you stop learning, you will stop growing.

    Becoming mature not only entails your age, but it should also speak highly of how much you have learned through the years. Seize every chance to learn. Read a book. Listen to people. There are a lot of ways to learn and life is but a huge classroom.

    Give your tamariki those feathers experiences so they may soar. A lot more often than we know, we get stuck in dreaming about the things we want in life. However, acting on what we wish for makes a big difference. Once we act on what we want, our dreams will turn into reality. Take that leap and make your dreams come true. Discover and know. Know and become enlightened. Learning is a journey.

    It starts with a conscious effort to seek knowledge. Upon seeking, you will surely discover a brand new thing or see a familiar object in a totally new light. Eventually, the things you know will lead you to become wise beyond your years. Be enlightened. These are just some of the wide selection of whakatauki you may want to learn and they come under a lot of themes as well!

    Aside from themes about learning and wisdom, there are also whakatauki about love, community, environment, and self-identity. Finally, acquiring these whakatauki in your everyday living will not only help you in learning te reo Maori and in making wise decisions. You will become a part of this rich oral tradition that has transcended centuries of being passed on from generation to generation.

    If you want more whakatauki and beautiful posters of them, click here. You can post them at home, in your classroom, in your office, or anywhere you want to see them at! Rehua, the Atua of Kindness Below is a fun activity for home or school. It would also may a wonderful koha for someone else. Good holiday activity.

    Listening to the People of the Land

    I consented to write the chapter, and on the 31st of October the e-book was launched. For the purposes of this blog, I have translated my thoughts from that time into English for everyone to read. Here is my disclaimer: all the ideas and thoughts are mine, and are an interpretation rather than a direct translation of my previous blog.

    In this blog, the concept of Whanaungatanga — Relationships will be discussed. Whanaungatanga is a massive kaupapa, one which can not be fully unpacked in one short blog. Everyone has a whakapapa, a genealogy, heritage and identity that makes that person no more and no less important than the next person.

    When we learn to treat everyone with care and respect, there are fewer barriers to establishing and maintaining relationships. Address the issues and not the tangata. Listen attentively to what others are saying and expressing. When people are sharing their thoughts, ideas, and aspirations, be respectful of what they are saying and how they are saying it before you respond. Ko au ko te awa. Ko te awa ko au. I am the river and the river is me.

    This Whanganui proverb describes the relationship between people and the environment, and in this context, the tangata whenua and their ancestral river. The mighty Whanganui river provided oranga sustenance and wellbeing to the people who resided on its banks.

    Without the river and all its bounty, life would become increasingly difficult. Without the river flowing freely, the land would soon become barren and unworkable. We are the kaitiaki guardians of this world. In our role as kaitiaki, people need to care for and respect our environment and our environment will care and provide for us. He states that people need to be self confident and self assured to be healthy in mind, body and soul. If all the sides of the whare are strong, so too is the person.

    Without these three things we are incomplete. Our students achieve better when they know they are respected and cared about, and so too, we work better with our colleagues when we are all treated equally and our thoughts, ideas and beliefs are respected. In the ever-changing game of Professional Development, as providers we must ensure we are being honest, trusting and respectful as this forms the foundation of successful healthy relationships.

    When time is taken to learn about others, to listen to their needs and to their goals, a strong bond is formed. The hard work is then maintaining the relationship! The following two tabs change content below. Prior to this he was employed at Statistics New Zealand working as a Team Leader on various research tasks for the and Census projects.

    Latest posts by Tahu Paki see all Whanaungatanga - July 28,

    Let us keep close together, not wide apart. Spanish: Sigamos juntos, no separados. Like the myriad of stars in the heavens, so is the essence of humanity spread across the land.

    Aim for the highest cloud so that if you miss it, you will hit a lofty mountain.

    Te Reo Whakataukī and Growth Mindset (Freebie)

    E kore e taka te parapara ona tupuna; tukua iho kia a ia. He cannot fail to inherit the talents of our ancestors. They must descend to him. Ma tini ma mano ka rapa te whai. Many hands make light work. Spanish: Muchas manos aligeran el trabajo. The person with a narrow vision sees a narrow horizon, the person with a wide vision sees a wide horizon.

    Kia mate ururoa, kei mate whekeo. Fight like a shark, not like an octopus. There are many elements to consider in this situation. Just as the clouds cover the sky, so a bird must have feathers to fly with. When you cry, we all cry. Spanish: Cuando llores, todos lloramos. Ahakoa he iti he pounamu.

    Despite being small it is of great value. The world is yours. Spanish: El mundo es tuyo. Tangata takahi manuhiri, he marae puehu. A person who mistreats a guest has a dusty marae. Spanish: Una persona que maltrata a su invitado tiene un marae con mucho polvo.

    I consented to write the chapter, and on the 31st of October the e-book was launched. For the purposes of this blog, I have translated my thoughts from that time into English for everyone to read. Here is my disclaimer: all the ideas and thoughts are mine, and are an interpretation rather than a direct translation of my previous blog. In this blog, the concept of Whanaungatanga — Relationships will be discussed. Whanaungatanga is a massive kaupapa, one which can not be fully unpacked in one short blog.

    Māori Proverbs = Whakataukī

    Everyone has a whakapapa, a genealogy, heritage and identity that makes that person no more and no less important than the next person. When we learn to treat everyone with care and respect, there are fewer barriers to establishing and maintaining relationships. Address the issues and not the tangata. Listen attentively to what others are saying and expressing.

    When people are sharing their thoughts, ideas, and aspirations, be respectful of what they are saying and how they are saying it before you respond. Ko au ko te awa. Ko te awa ko au. I am the river and the river is me. This Whanganui proverb describes the relationship between people and the environment, and in this context, the tangata whenua and their ancestral river.


    Whakatauki listening