Letter to editor about shortage of electricity


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  • Write a letter to the editor complaining about load-shedding-Letter to Editor
  • A letter to the Editor of a newspaper For Frequent Power Cuts

    July 22, at p. Water shortage solution Dear Editor: No real solution to our water shortages has been presented or considered. All we have seen and heard is how to live with the problem. Conservation is obviously necessary, but it is not a solution. We need a national approach similar to our electricity grid. They only save fish. Ecological safeguards are important, as always, but they do not solve the water shortage problem. The problem needs to be approached on a bigger scale. It is bigger than any one state, and no state can solve this problem for the entire country, let alone for itself.

    While California braces for a water disaster, Washington state is seeing rain wash away hillsides and bury towns. We often see too much water in one place, while another suffers a drought. While the plains are dying of thirst, millions of acre feet of water are pouring into the Pacific. Like building the interstate highway network, it would be a huge, expensive endeavor. Building an interstate pipeline network plus water storage facilities would take years and billions of dollars.

    All states and the federal government would need to participate to get this financed and completed. It would benefit the entire nation by solving a problem that has been haunting the United States from the birth of our nation. California has a great need and should lead the nation in solving a problem that will get worse as our population inevitably grows. Matt Johnston Build desalination plants Dear Editor: It has been said that we had three years of drought to prepare and blew it.

    That is true, but instead of holding this governor and legislature accountable for not funding new sources of water, you come down on their side that we all need to conserve more and if not, be fined.

    The state could easily provide enough water for about 36 million Californians if the money they are throwing away with the high-speed rail and twin tunnels boondoggles would be spent on desalination plants. That means this state could survive a 12 months lack of rain if it had the desalination plants that these two projects are costing.

    Such spending often results in poorer outcomes. It was instituted in , and is the model for ObamaCare. We can only wonder what the equivalent amount will be when ObamaCare is eight years old. A trillion or two would be a good guess, no doubt also often resulting in poorer outcomes.

    Bob Liles Antioch Letters policy Let your East County neighbors know what you think about issues of the day by writing a letter to the editor. Letters should be signed. Both letters and email should include the daytime phone number and address of the writer. The information will not be printed but rather used for verification purposes.

    We reserve the right to edit or not publish letters deemed potentially libelous, that are ads for local businesses or are otherwise unsuitable for a family newspaper. Also, we are looking for guest commentaries, especially on local issues. Please send to bnews bayareanewsgroup.

    Letters to the Editor

    Renewable Energy and Electricity Updated August There is widespread popular support for using renewable energy, particularly solar and wind energy, which provide electricity without giving rise to any carbon dioxide emissions.

    Harnessing these for electricity depends on the cost and efficiency of the technology, which is constantly improving, thus reducing costs per peak kilowatt, and per kWh at the source. Utilising electricity from solar and wind in a grid becomes problematical at high levels for complex but now well-demonstrated reasons. Supply does not correspond with demand. Back-up generating capacity is required due to the intermittent nature of solar and wind.

    System costs escalate with increasing proportion of variable renewables. Policy settings to support renewables are generally required to confer priority in grid systems and also subsidise them, and some 50 countries have these provisions. Utilising solar and wind-generated electricity in a stand-alone system requires corresponding battery or other storage capacity. The possibility of large-scale use of hydrogen in the future as a transport fuel increases the potential for both renewables directly and base-load electricity supply off-peak.

    Technology to utilize the forces of nature for doing work to supply human needs is as old as the first sailing ship. But attention swung away from renewable sources as the industrial revolution progressed on the basis of the concentrated energy locked up in fossil fuels. This was compounded by the increasing use of reticulated electricity based on fossil fuels and the importance of portable high-density energy sources for transport — the era of oil.

    As electricity demand escalated, with supply depending largely on fossil fuels plus some hydro power and then nuclear energy, concerns arose about carbon dioxide CO2 emissions contributing to possible global warming. Attention again turned to the huge sources of energy surging around us in nature — sun, wind, and seas in particular. There was never any doubt about the magnitude of these, the challenge was always in harnessing them so as to meet demand for reliable and affordable electricity.

    Today many countries are well advanced in meeting that challenge, while also testing the practical limits of doing so from wind and solar variable renewable energy, VRE. The relatively dilute nature of wind and solar mean that harnessing them is very materials-intensive — many times that from energy-dense sources.

    Wind turbines have developed greatly in recent decades, solar photovoltaic technology is much more efficient, and there are improved prospects of harnessing the energy in tides and waves. Solar thermal technologies in particular with some heat storage have great potential in sunny climates. With government encouragement to utilize wind and solar technologies, their costs have come down and are now in the same league per kilowatt-hour dispatched from the plant as the costs of fossil fuel technologies, especially where there are carbon emissions charges on electricity generation from them.

    However, the variability of wind and solar power does not correspond with most demand, and as substantial capacity has been built in several countries in response to government incentives, occasional massive output — as well as occasional zero output — from these sources creates major problems in maintaining the reliability and economic viability of the whole system.

    There is a new focus on system costs related to achieving reliable supply to meet demand. In the following text, the levelised cost of electricity LCOE is used to indicate the average cost per unit of electricity generated at the actual plant, allowing for the recovery of all costs over the lifetime of the plant.

    It includes capital, financing, operation and maintenance, fuel if any , and decommissioning. Another relevant metric is energy return on energy invested EROI. This is not quoted for particular projects, but is the subject of more general studies. EROI is the ratio of the energy delivered by a process to the energy used directly and indirectly in that process, and is part of lifecycle analysis LCA.

    An EROI of about 7 is considered break-even economically for developed countries. First, their maximum output fluctuates according to the real-time availability of wind and sunlight. Second, such fluctuations can be predicted accurately only a few hours to days in advance. Third, they are non-synchronous and use devices known as power converters in order to connect to the grid this can be relevant in terms of how to ensure the stability of power systems.

    Fourth, they are more modular and can be deployed in a much more distributed fashion. Fifth, unlike fossil or nuclear fuels, wind and sunlight cannot be transported, and while renewable energy resources are available in many areas, the best resources are frequently located at a distance from load centres thus, in some cases, increasing connection costs.

    All the modelling is within a 50g CO2 per kWh emission constraint, and quantifies the system costs due to different levels of VRE input, despite declining LCOE costs and zero marginal costs for those. System effects are often divided into the following four broadly defined categories: Profile costs also referred to as utilisation costs or backup costs by some researchers.

    Balancing costs. Grid costs. Connection costs to the grid sometimes included in LCOE. The NEA study states: "Profile costs or utilisation costs refer to the increase in the generation cost of the overall electricity system in response to the variablity of VRE output.

    They are thus at the heart of the notion of system effects. They capture, in particular, the fact that in most of the cases it is more expensive to provide the residual load in a system with VRE than in an equivalent system where VRE are replaced by dispatchable plants. These measures include flexible power sources such as hydro and open cycle gas turbines, demand-side measures, electricity storage, strong and smart transmission and distribution grids.

    The costs of all these, over and above the generation costs, comprise the system costs. See later section on System integration costs of intermittent renewable power generation.

    A further aspect of considering sources such as wind and solar in the context of grid supply is that their true capacity is discounted to allow for intermittency. In the UK this is by a factor of 0. This novel convention is not followed in this information paper. Demand for clean energy There is a fundamental attractiveness about harnessing such forces in an age which is very conscious of the environmental effects of burning fossil fuels, and where sustainability is an ethical norm.

    So today the focus is on both adequacy of energy supply long-term and also the environmental implications of particular sources. In that regard, the costs being imposed on CO2 emissions in developed countries at least have profoundly changed the economic outlook of clean energy sources.

    A market-determined carbon price creates incentives for energy sources that are cleaner than current fossil fuel sources without distinguishing among different technologies. This puts the onus on the generating utility to employ technologies which efficiently supply power to the consumer at a competitive price. Wind, solar and nuclear are the main contenders.

    Sun, wind, waves, rivers, tides and the heat from radioactive decay in the earth's mantle as well as biomass are all abundant and ongoing, hence the term "renewables". Solar energy's main human application has been in agriculture and forestry, via photosynthesis, and increasingly it is harnessed for heat. Until recently electricity has been a niche application for solar. Biomass e. The others are little used as yet. Turning to the use of abundant renewable energy sources other than large-scale hydro for electricity, there are challenges in actually harnessing them.

    Apart from solar photovoltaic PV systems which produce electricity directly, the question is how to make them turn dynamos to generate the electricity. If it is heat which is harnessed, this is via a steam generating system. This means either that there must be reliable duplicate sources of electricity beyond the normal system reserve, or some means of large-scale electricity storage see later section.

    Policies which favour renewables over other sources may also be required. Such policies, now in place in about 50 countries, include priority dispatch for electricity from renewable sources and special feed-in tariffs, quota obligations and energy tax exemptions. The prospects, opportunities and challenges for renewables are discussed below in this context. Load curves for typical electricity grid source: VENcorp This load curve diagram shows that much of the electricity demand is in fact for continuous supply base-load , while some is for a lesser amount of predictable supply for about three-quarters of the day, and less still for variable peak demand up to half of the time; some of the overnight demand is for domestic hot water systems on cheap tariffs.

    With overnight charging of electric vehicles it is easy to see how the base-load proportion would grow, increasing the scope for nuclear and other plants which produce it. Source: Vencorp Most electricity demand is for continuous, reliable supply that has traditionally been provided by base-load electricity generation. Some is for shorter-term e. Hence if renewable sources are linked to a grid, the question of back-up capacity arises; for a stand-alone system, energy storage is the main issue.

    Apart from pumped-storage hydro systems see later section , no such means exist at present on any large scale. However, a distinct advantage of solar and to some extent other renewable systems is that they are distributed and may be near the points of demand, thereby reducing power transmission losses if traditional generating plants are distant. Of course, this same feature more often counts against wind in that the best sites for harnessing it are sometimes remote from populations, and the main back-up for lack of wind in one place is wind blowing hard in another, hence requiring a wide network with flexible operation.

    Rivers and hydroelectricity Hydroelectric power, using the potential energy of rivers, is by far the best-established means of electricity generation from renewable sources. It may also be large-scale — nine of the ten largest power plants in the world are hydro, using dams on rivers. In contrast to wind and solar generation, hydro plants have considerable mechanical inertia and are synchronous, helping with grid stability.

    Apart from those five countries with a relative abundance of it Norway, Canada, Switzerland, New Zealand and Sweden , hydro capacity is normally applied to peak-load demand, because it is so readily stopped and started. The individual turbines of a hydro plant can be run up from zero to full power in about ten minutes.

    This also means that it is an ideal complement to wind power in a grid system, and is used thus most effectively by Denmark see case study below.

    Hydropower using large storage reservoirs on rivers is not a major option for the future in the developed countries because most major sites in these countries having potential for harnessing gravity in this way are either being exploited already or are unavailable for other reasons such as environmental considerations. Growth to is expected mostly in China and Latin America. Brazil is planning to have 25 GWe of new hydro capacity by , involving considerable environmental impact.

    The chief advantage of hydro systems is their capacity to handle seasonal as well as daily high peak loads. In practice the utilisation of stored water is sometimes complicated by demands for irrigation which may occur out of phase with peak electrical demands. Hydroelectric power plants can constrain the water flow through each turbine to vary output, though with fixed-blade turbines this reduces generating efficiency.

    More sophisticated and expensive Kaplan turbines have variable pitch and are efficient at a range of flow rates. With multiple fixed-blade turbines e. Francis turbine , they can individually be run at full power or shut down. Run-of-river hydro systems are usually much smaller than dammed ones but have potentially wider application.

    Some short-term pondage can help them adapt to daily load profiles, but generally they produce continuously, apart from seasonal variation in river flows. Pumped storage is discussed below under Renewables in relation to base-load demand. Wind energy.

    Write a complaint letter regarding irregular electric supply in your locality

    Balancing costs. Grid costs. Connection costs to the grid sometimes included in LCOE. The NEA study states: "Profile costs or utilisation costs refer to the increase in the generation cost of the overall electricity system in response to the variablity of VRE output. They are thus at the heart of the notion of system effects. They capture, in particular, the fact that in most of the cases it is more expensive to provide the residual load in a system with VRE than in an equivalent system where VRE are replaced by dispatchable plants.

    These measures include flexible power sources such as hydro and open cycle gas turbines, demand-side measures, electricity storage, strong and smart transmission and distribution grids. The costs of all these, over and above the generation costs, comprise the system costs. See later section on System integration costs of intermittent renewable power generation. A further aspect of considering sources such as wind and solar in the context of grid supply is that their true capacity is discounted to allow for intermittency.

    In the UK this is by a factor of 0.

    Letter to Editor: Electricity problem in Karachi

    This novel convention is not followed in this information paper. Demand for clean energy There is a fundamental attractiveness about harnessing such forces in an age which is very conscious of the environmental effects of burning fossil fuels, and where sustainability is an ethical norm. So today the focus is on both adequacy of energy supply long-term and also the environmental implications of particular sources.

    In that regard, the costs being imposed on CO2 emissions in developed countries at least have profoundly changed the economic outlook of clean energy sources. A market-determined carbon price creates incentives for energy sources that are cleaner than current fossil fuel sources without distinguishing among different technologies. This puts the onus on the generating utility to employ technologies which efficiently supply power to the consumer at a competitive price.

    Wind, solar and nuclear are the main contenders. Sun, wind, waves, rivers, tides and the heat from radioactive decay in the earth's mantle as well as biomass are all abundant and ongoing, hence the term "renewables". Solar energy's main human application has been in agriculture and forestry, via photosynthesis, and increasingly it is harnessed for heat.

    Until recently electricity has been a niche application for solar. Biomass e. The others are little used as yet. Turning to the use of abundant renewable energy sources other than large-scale hydro for electricity, there are challenges in actually harnessing them. Apart from solar photovoltaic PV systems which produce electricity directly, the question qq international login how to make them turn dynamos to generate the electricity.

    If it is heat which is harnessed, this is via a steam generating system. This means either that there must be reliable duplicate sources of electricity beyond the normal system reserve, or some means of large-scale electricity storage see later section. Policies which favour renewables over other sources may also be required. Such policies, now in place in about 50 countries, include priority dispatch for electricity from renewable sources and special feed-in tariffs, quota obligations and energy tax exemptions.

    The prospects, opportunities and challenges for renewables are discussed below in this context. Load curves for typical electricity grid source: VENcorp This load curve diagram shows that much of the electricity demand is in fact for continuous supply base-loadwhile some is for a lesser amount of predictable supply for about three-quarters of the day, and less still for variable peak demand up to half of the time; some of the overnight demand is for domestic hot water systems on cheap tariffs.

    With overnight charging of electric vehicles it is easy to see how the base-load proportion would grow, increasing the scope for nuclear and other plants which produce it. Source: Vencorp Most electricity demand is for continuous, reliable supply that has traditionally been provided by base-load electricity generation.

    Some is for shorter-term e. Hence if renewable sources are linked to a grid, the question of back-up capacity arises; for a stand-alone system, energy storage is the main issue.

    Apart from pumped-storage hydro systems see later sectionno such means exist at present on any large scale.

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    However, a distinct advantage of solar and to some extent other renewable systems is that they are distributed and may be near the points of demand, thereby reducing power transmission losses if traditional generating plants are distant.

    Of course, this same feature more often counts against wind in that the best sites for harnessing it are sometimes remote from populations, and the main back-up for lack of wind in one place is wind blowing hard in another, hence requiring a wide network with flexible operation. Rivers and hydroelectricity Hydroelectric power, using the potential energy of rivers, is by far the best-established means of electricity generation from renewable sources.

    It may also be large-scale — nine of the ten largest power plants in the world are hydro, using dams on rivers. In contrast to wind and solar generation, hydro plants have considerable mechanical inertia and are synchronous, helping with grid stability.

    Apart from those five countries with a relative abundance of it Norway, Canada, Switzerland, New Zealand and Swedenhydro capacity is normally applied to peak-load demand, because it is so readily stopped and started. The individual turbines of a hydro plant can be run up from zero to full power in about ten minutes.

    This also means that it is an ideal complement to wind power in a grid system, and is used thus most effectively by Denmark see case study below. Hydropower using large storage reservoirs on rivers is not a major option for the future in the developed countries because most major sites in these countries having potential for harnessing gravity in this way are either being exploited already or are unavailable for other reasons such as environmental considerations.

    Growth to is expected mostly in China and Latin America. We do not see a resolution to this problem anytime soon if action is not taken immediately. If we are given the proper reason, we would certainly understand and cooperate with the authority to get a solution.

    I genuinely urge the authority to start working on this problem at the earliest. Yours sincerely Poonam Advani.

    Write a letter to the editor complaining about load-shedding-Letter to Editor

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    Letter to editor about shortage of electricity