Myths about public speaking ielts reading answer


  • Ielts Books, Ielts Learning, Ielts Skills, Ielts Tests
  • IELTSFever Academic Reading Test 24 Answers
  • Don’t Be Fooled: 10 Myths About the IELTS Speaking Test
  • IELTS Speaking: Top frequently asked questions
  • IELTS Reading Practice Test 50 with Answers
  • The Creativity Myth, Locked Doors Open Access, A leap into history – IELTS Reading Answers
  • Ielts Books, Ielts Learning, Ielts Skills, Ielts Tests

    You should spend about 20 minutes on Questions which are based on Reading Passage 3 below. Making of Olympic Torch A Every two years, people around the world wait in anticipation as a torch-bearing runner enters the Olympic arena and lights the cauldron.

    The symbolic lighting of the Olympic flame marks the beginning of another historic Olympic Games. The opening ceremony is the end of a long journey for the Olympic torch. The ancient Greeks revered the power of fire. In Greek mythology, the god Prometheus stole fire from Zeus and gave it to humans. The Greeks held their first Olympic Games in B. The Games, held every four years at Olympia, honored Zeus and other Greek gods.

    A constantly burning flame was a regular fixture throughout Greece. At the start of the Olympic Games, the Greeks would ignite a cauldron of flame upon the altar dedicated to Hera, goddess of birth and marriage.

    B The flame was reintroduced to the Olympics at the Amsterdam Games. A cauldron was lit, but there was no torch relay. The first Olympic torch relay was at the Berlin Summer Games and it was not introduced to the Winter Olympics until the Games. It was lit that year not in Olympia, Greece, but in Norway, which was chosen because it was the birthplace of skiing. But since the Olympics at Innsbruck, Austria, every Olympic Games — Winter and Summer — has begun with a torch-lighting ceremony in Olympia, Greece, followed by a torch relay to the Olympic stadium.

    Designing an Olympic Torch C The torch starts out as an idea in the mind of a designer or group of designers. Several design teams submit proposals to the Olympic Committee for the opportunity to create and build the torch.

    The team that wins the assignment will design a torch that is both aesthetically pleasing and functional. A torch can take a year or two to design and build. And once the torch has been built, it must be tested rigorously in all kinds of weather conditions. His design provided the basis for all future torches. Since then, designers have tried to create a torch that represents the host country and the theme for that Olympic Games.

    D The torch must then be replicated … and replicated. Anywhere from 10, to 15, torches are constructed to accommodate the thousands of runners who carry them through each leg of the Olympic relay. Each runner has the opportunity to purchase his torch at the end of his leg of the relay. Olympic Torch fuel E The first torch used in the modern Olympics the Berlin Games was made of a thin steel rod topped with a circular piece from which the flame rose.

    It was inscribed with a dedication to the runners. The torch must stay lit for the entire length of its journey. It must survive wind, rain, sleet, snow, and a variety of climates desert, mountain, and ocean. For fuel, early torches burned everything from gunpowder to olive oil. Some torches used a mixture of hexamine a mixture of formaldehyde and ammonia and naphthalene the hydrogen- and carbon-based substance in mothballs with an igniting liquid. The first liquid fuels were introduced at the Munich Games.

    Torches since that time have carried liquid fuels — they are stored under pressure as a liquid but burn as a gas to produce a flame.

    Liquid fuel is safe for the runner and can be stored in a lightweight canister. The torch designed for the Atlanta Summer Olympics has an aluminum base that houses a small fuel tank. As fuel rises through the handle, it is pushed through a brass valve with thousands of tiny openings. As the fuel squeezes through the small openings, it builds pressure. Once it makes it through the openings, the pressure drops, and the liquid fuel turns into gas for burning. The tiny holes maintain a high pressure in the fuel to keep the flame going through harsh conditions.

    F The torch was fueled by propylene, which produced a bright flame. But because propylene contains a high level of carbon, it also produced a lot of smoke — not a plus for the environment. In , the creators of the Sydney Olympic torch came up with a more lightweight, inexpensive, and environmentally friendly design. To fuel their torch, they decided on a mixture of 35 percent propane the gas used to heat home stoves and barbecue grills and 65 percent butane cigarette lighter fuel , which ignites a strong flame without making a lot of smoke.

    It then burns as a gas under normal atmospheric pressure. The liquid fuel is stored in an aluminum canister located about halfway up the torch. If flows up to the top of the torch through a pipe. Before leaving the pipe, the liquid fuel is forced through a tiny hole. Once it moves through the hole, there is a pressure drop, causing the liquid to turn into gas for burning.

    The torch moves the liquid fuel at a consistent rate to the burner, so the flame always burns with the same intensity. The torch can stay lit for about 15 minutes.

    G The engineers behind both the and torches adopted a burner system that utilized a double flame, helping them to stay lit even in erratic winds. The external flame burns slowly and at a lower temperature than the internal flame. This flame is big and bright orange, so it can be seen clearly, but it is unstable in winds. The interior flame burns hotter, producing a blue flame that is small but very stable because its internal location protects it from the wind.

    It would act like a pilot light, able to relight the external flame should it go out. The glass stood for purity, winter, ice, and nature. Also inside the glass was a geometric copper structure which helped hold the flame. The Olympic torch, as Olympic Committee requested, is carefully designed which takes years to design and build so that it is capable of withstanding all kinds of 27………………….. The torch used in the modern Olympics which is to hold the 28…………………… And the torch must then be copied and thousands are built as demanded by the thousands of runners who carry them through.

    Each runner has the opportunity to 29…………………… his torch at the completion of his journey of the relay for memorial and as for souvenirs. Match the following statements as applying to different Olympic flames A-H.

    NB There are more choices than questions. You may not need all the choices.

    IELTSFever Academic Reading Test 24 Answers

    Answer: B. The answer is in the second sentence of paragraph 1: we crave security. A, C and D are all mentioned in the paragraph, but not in the correct context. Answer: A. The answer is In the first sentence of paragraph 2: now do not. B Is the opposite and C and D are just phrases lifted from the text.

    Answer: D. A Is Incorrect, bccause only some access is not allowed. Questions Complete the text below, which Is a summary of paragraphs Choose your answers from the Word List below and write them in Boxes on your answer sheet. There are more words and phrases than spaces, so you will not be able to use them all. You may use any word or phrase more than once. Answer: physical. Show Answers Answer: Solved, Although the word combat appears In the original, it does not fit here grammatically.

    The past participle is needed. Answer: computers. The plural is needed here. Answer: other people. Answer: cut-off. The word isolating docs not fit grammatically. Compare 20 above. Answer: team-work. Answer: decrease in. As It says In the instructions, you may use a word or phrase more than once.

    Answer: Just the same way as. The answer is obviously not similar or no different from. Questions Complete the sentences below. Write your answers in Boxes on your answer sheet. Answer: touch-tone dialling system. The answer is In paragraph 7: If we are unfortunate enough to contact an organization with a sophisticated touch-tone dialling system.

    The key word here Is unfortunate, which shows that the writer is negative about the topic. The writer does not comment on the other means of communication in the same way. Answer: electronic presence. The answer Is In paragraph 8. Answer: no longer geographical.

    The answer is in paragraphs 8 and 9: … now that location is no longer geographical …An example of this is the mobile phone. The important thing here is to recognise the link between the paragraphs. The first relates food and eating to social relationships, Finkelsteln, Vlssor, Wood , and the second establishes food as a reflection of the distribution of power within social structures, Mennell.

    However, establishing a role for food in personal relationships and social structures is not a sufficient argument to place food at the centre of national culture, To do that it is necessary to prove a degree of embeddedness. It would be appropriate at this point to consider the nature of culture. Whilst a piece of behaviour may take place very often, involve a network of people and be reproducible by other networks who do not know each other, the meaning of the behaviour does not go beyond the activity itself.

    Celebrating birthdays is a cultural practice not because everybody does it but because it has a religious meaning. A smaller scale example might be more useful. Both arc common practices, yet the former reflects something of the social fabric of the country, particularly family, gender, class and age relationships whilst the latter is just a national habit. In other words, a constant, well-populated pattern of behaviour is not necessarily cultural.

    However, it is also clear that a cultural practice needs behavioural reinforcement. Social culture is not immortal. That aside, the significance of a behavioural practice being embedded In culture is that it naturally maintains an approved and accepted way of life and therefore has a tendency to resist change. The thrust of the argument is that countries differ in the degree to which their food and eating habits have a social and cultural meaning beyond the behaviour itself.

    This is a difficult position to maintain because it would bring America, with its fast-food culture to the fore. The fast-food culture of America raises the issue of whether there are qualitative criteria for the concept of cuisine. How homogenous is national cuisinef like language, cuisine is not a static entity and whilst Its fundamental character is unlikely to change in the short run it may evolve in different directions.

    Just as in a language there arc dialects so in a cuisine there arc variations. The two principal sources of diversity arc the physical geography of the country and its social diversity. The geographical dimensions work through agriculture to particularise and to limit locally produced Ingredients. This raises the question of how far a national cuisine is related to national borders. To an ethnic group their cuisine is national. The greater the division of a society into classes, castes and status groups with their attendant ethnocentric properties, of which cuisine is a part, then the greater will be the diversity of the cuisincs.

    However, there is a case for convergence. Both these principal sources of diversity arc, to an extent, influenced by the strength of their boundaries and the willingness of society to erode them. It Is a question of isolation and integration. Similarly, political and social Integration can erode ethnic boundaries. Riley argues that when a cuisine is not embedded in social culture It is susceptible to novelty and Invasion by other cuisincs.

    Write the appropriate letters A-K In Boxes on your answer sheet. The information In the completed sentences should be an accurate summary of the points made by the writer. There are more phrases A-K than sentences, so you will not need to use them all.

    You may use each phrase once only. Key point The native foods of a country, … The ethnocentric properties of food … Celebrating birthdays … Drinking in pubs in Britain … The link between language and cuisine List of Phrases A.

    Is a behavioural practice, not a cultural practice B. Answer: K. The answer is in the first sentence of the passage. Note that the active needs to be changed into the passive. Answer: G. The answer is in the first paragraph.

    B is not correct, because the passage says foods may be unique, not that they are and is not talking about ethnocentric properties. Answer: F. The answer is in paragraph 3. Answer: J. The answer Is In paragraph 4.

    The key phrase Is towards the end of the paragraph: a cultural practice needs behavioural reinforcement.. Answer: E. The answer Is in the third paragraph, The answer is in paragraph 6. C is incorrect, because it is the language and the cuisine that vary, not the link. And H is not correct.

    It is the character of language and cuisine that Is said to be fundamental, and not language and cuisine themselves. Beware of the right word or phrase In the wrong context. Questions Use the information in the text to match the Authors A-D with the Findings below. Write the appropriate letters A-D in Boxes on your answer sheet.

    Don’t Be Fooled: 10 Myths About the IELTS Speaking Test

    The plural is needed here. Answer: other people. Answer: cut-off. The word isolating docs not fit grammatically. Compare 20 above.

    IELTS Speaking: Top frequently asked questions

    Answer: team-work. Answer: decrease in. As It says In the instructions, you may use a word or phrase more than once. Answer: Just the same way as. The answer is obviously not similar or no different from.

    Questions Complete the sentences below. Write your answers in Boxes on your answer sheet. Answer: touch-tone dialling system.

    IELTS Reading Practice Test 50 with Answers

    The answer is In paragraph 7: If we are unfortunate enough to contact an organization with a sophisticated touch-tone dialling system. The key word here Is unfortunate, which shows that the writer is negative about the topic. The writer does not comment on the other means of communication in the same way.

    Answer: electronic presence. The answer Is In paragraph 8. Answer: no longer geographical. The answer is in paragraphs 8 and 9: … now that location is no longer geographical …An example of this is the mobile phone. The important thing here is to recognise the link between the paragraphs.

    The first relates food and eating to social relationships, Finkelsteln, Vlssor, Woodand the second establishes food as a reflection of the distribution of power within social structures, Mennell. However, establishing a role for food in personal relationships and social structures is not a sufficient argument to place food at the centre of national culture, To do that it is necessary to prove a degree of embeddedness. It would be appropriate at this point to consider the nature of culture.

    Whilst a piece of behaviour may take place very often, involve a network of people and be reproducible by other networks who do not know each other, the meaning of the behaviour does not go beyond the activity itself. Celebrating birthdays is a cultural practice not because everybody does it but because it has a religious meaning. A smaller scale example might be more useful.

    Both arc common practices, yet the former reflects something of the social fabric of the country, particularly family, gender, class and age relationships whilst the latter is just a national habit. In other words, a constant, well-populated pattern of behaviour is not necessarily cultural.

    However, it is also clear that a cultural practice needs behavioural reinforcement. Social culture is not immortal. That aside, the significance of a behavioural practice being embedded In culture is that it naturally maintains an approved and accepted way of life and therefore has a tendency to resist change. The thrust of the argument is that countries differ in the degree to which their food and eating habits have a social and cultural meaning beyond the behaviour itself.

    This is a difficult position to maintain because it would bring America, with its fast-food culture to the fore. The fast-food culture of America raises the issue of whether there are qualitative criteria for the concept of cuisine.

    How homogenous is national cuisinef like language, cuisine is not a static entity and whilst Its fundamental character is unlikely to change in the short run it may evolve in different directions. Just as in a language there arc dialects so in a cuisine there arc variations. The two principal sources of diversity arc the physical geography of the country and its social diversity. The geographical dimensions work through agriculture to particularise and to limit locally produced Ingredients.

    This raises the question of how far a national cuisine is related to national borders.

    The Creativity Myth, Locked Doors Open Access, A leap into history – IELTS Reading Answers

    To an ethnic group their cuisine is national. The greater the division of a society into classes, castes and status groups with their attendant ethnocentric properties, of which cuisine is a part, then the greater will be the diversity of the cuisincs. However, there is a case for convergence. Both these principal sources of diversity arc, to an extent, influenced by the strength of their boundaries and the willingness of society to erode them.

    It Is a question of isolation and integration. The Park, like so many Celtic places, is steeped in history and legend. The town takes its name from the legend of a dog leaping into the river Roe carrying a message, or perhaps chasing a stag. This is a wonderful place, where the water traces its way through rock and woodland; at times, lingering in brooding pools of dark cool water under the shade of summer trees, and, at others, forming weirs and leads for water mills now long gone.

    The Roe, like all rivers, is witness to history and change. Limavady town itself and many of the surrounding villages have Celtic roots but no one knows for sure just how old the original settlement of Limavady is. Some 30 miles along the coast road from Limavady, one comes upon the forlorn, but the imposing ruin of Dunluce Castle, which stands on a soft basalt outcrop, in defiance of the turbulent Atlantic lashing it on all sides. The only connection to the mainland is by a narrow bridge.

    Until the kitchen court fell into the sea in killing several servants, the castle was fully inhabited. In the next hundred years or so, the structure gradually fell into its present dramatic state of disrepair, stripped of its roofs by wind and weather and robbed by a man of its caned stonework.

    A mile or so to the east of the castle lies Port na Spanish, where the Neapolitan Galleas, Girona, from the Spanish Armada went down one dark October night in on its way to Scotland, of the odd men on board, nine survived. Someone once said of the Causeway that it was worth seeing, but not worth going to see. That was in the days of horses and carriages when travelling was difficult. But it is certainly well worth a visit. The last lingering moments of the twilight hours are the best lime to savour the full power of the coastline s magic; the time when the place comes into its own.


    Myths about public speaking ielts reading answer