Arduino midi patchbay


  • $50 Open-Source MIDI Controller, The Chomp, Looks Awesome
  • Open Music Lab’s Projects and Tools
  • How you can Convert a MIDI Port to USB (3 Steps)
  • Tobiasz's passion is electronic music and open source software. LMMS for sequencing and synthesizing, Ardour for recording, editing and mastering. Hi Tobiasz and thank you for taking the time to do the interview. Where do you live, and what do you do for a living? I live in Warsaw, Poland and I work as a graphic designer in a small local company. I also make some music and sound design for video games for mobile platforms. What is your musical background?

    I started messing around with computer music around using FL Studio 5. I knew nothing about music theory at that time, I just had fun making simple compositions.

    Around that time I also started singing inspired by System of a Down's vocal harmonies. Around I started serving with my voice in a local church group. Unfa is a big fan of System of a Down.

    Can you tell? I also was playing as a drummer and messing around with electric guitar. Since my early years I dreamed about a keyboard — I was staring at the shiny Casio workstations with floppy disk drives exposed in stores. I'm also writing songs and some poetry. My main instrument is my voice — singing, rapping, screaming, scatting, beatboxing, playing mouth-saxophone and voice acting. One of my long-term goals is to prove that open source software is capable of producing top quality music, that can achieve commercial success just like the music created with closed-source, proprietary software.

    I had some success in this field, I sold a bunch 20? The buyers all waited for an autograph and were very positive about the event. Unfa performing live in a local church during a Christmas event The only thing I didn't like about all this was my sore throat. I screamed much too much. This made me think a lot about what may destroy my voice and if I want to carry on performing this way. I knew I don't. I now scream sporadically and I don't want to make my music rely on this type of performance.

    However I value screaming as an extremely powerful musical device when used sparingly and carefully. Tell us a bit about your releases to date? Unfa's 3 longplay releases along with 5 singles. Unfa designs his cover images himself.

    There's one longplay that isn't listed above, it's called Jooze availabile on Last. This is my first ever longplay released. There's also an industrial-ambient soundtrack mini-album EP? I was asked to make a soundtrack for a YouTube channel dedicated to S. R gameplays. After it was done I decided to publish it under a creative commons license. It was included in LMMS demo songs minus the vocal sample and was promoted on it's main page for over a year.

    Are there any other projects you are working on at the moment? I'm currently working on a collaboration with Combustible Lemonade. We're making a little album together. It's gonna be crazy. Combustible Lemonade is mostly responisble for the composition, I'm doing the sound design. We're very excited about this project. I hope we'll be able to tell some more soon. Also there's a very recent video of me performing solo with the Choir of Warsaw Medical University.

    I won't tell you more, because it's a surprise. What is your typical workflow when making music? The unique aspect of my workflow is that I don't use any drum samples with a few exceptions or other people's presets.

    It took me a few years to develop a satisfying drum sound. I don't say that samples are bad. But that's easy and unoriginal. Early on I decided I want to develop a recognizable sound, and the synthesizers are one way of achieving that. I learned to use the mouse and piano roll tandem to transfer my musical ideas into LMMS. I often start with a beat. Kick, snare, hihat. Sometimes I start a track humming a lead or bass line, putting it quickly into the sequencer and working around that.

    Since april I started practising a new way. I try to start my work by laying down a chord progression, and build the bass and lead lines on top of that. Combustible Lemonade teaches me a bit about harmony and I'm trying to incorporate that.

    I very like distortion as a tool to make my synths more aggressive, harsh, analogue-like and rich. I frequently use a few types of distortion, I filter that, pan it left and right and mix in a small amount of that distorted and filtered signal with the dry original. ZynAddSubFX's distortion unit is fantastic for this, it's very easy and time-efficient for setting up such effects.

    Also I frequently layer a few slightly different versions of one synth, panning them around, detuning slightly, filtering and blending them together. It has 16 parts one for each MIDI channel each part has 3 effect slots, plus there are 4 global send effects and 8 insert effect to use for a single part or master channel.

    If you want to learn more, here's a video to watch. What tools would you suggest to newcomers who are into your specific genre of music? It lacks some functionality and has bugs like everything , but it can let you make great sequenced music. If you like synthesizers, want to use your old VSTi collection or just drop in some samples and make a beat - go ahead and try it : You can also download my projects as I synthesise all stuff, you might need some extra plugins, but no samples and tear them apart, I really like learning new software this way.

    When it comes to recording songs, LMMS is not enough though. I did my older stuff with Audacity, but it's not really designed for music production, it's for general sound editing and works great in that field. If you're into recording vocals or live instruments, or combining this with sequenced electronic stuff - or even scoring a movie - Ardour is gonna make you happy.

    If you're lost, I advise reading the manual. MIDI plays a big part in your workflow. I used to live in a cave - you know - spending hours and hours alone clicking music out of my mind into the computer. There are just a few tracks that contain material I actually played on a keyboard Hammond solo in "Spin" for instance - it's a trick recording I performed that in 4 times slower tempo, so it's a cheat anyway, also I used an AKAI MPK mini.

    Now I'm leaving the cave and slowly preparing myself for the stages, so reliable live MIDI processing is starting to get important just like the daily piano practice. I never know what is what, I just remember the red likes the orange and hates the green.

    An example of Unfa's connections as seen in Catia. Note the red, orange and green MIDI ports. Tell us a bit about your hardware set up My main sound recording device is Zoom H2. I chose it, as it was a highly portable and economic all-in-one sound capture device that I'm using for field recording, line recording of live events or electric instruments, and as a stereo home-studio microphone.

    I've recorded tens of hours of podcasts, many songs, hundreds of gigabytes of sounds, rehearsals, concerts, events, talks It's years old now. I was thinking about getting Zoom H2n, but I decided that the old one is still fine and I don't need a new recorder. Recently I switched to a Dell Lattitude shipped with Ubuntu Since I work on laptops and can't imagine myself confined to one desk right now.

    Since I'm always working with headphones, the first serious purchase in the field were Denon AH-D I bought them around I had to resolder the wires inside one headphone, I turned the muffs inside out and added dampeners made from scotch, because the rig was making clapping noises when I was walking quickly wearing the headphones. However they sound very good for their price and are quite comfortable.

    I guess the collaborative project with Combustible Lemonade will be mixed and mastered with them. I chose it for it's big potential for live performance and versatility. What is your history with Linux? I think my first distribution was Ubuntu 8. After that I became a distro vagabond. I used to change the distribution every time something broke and I wasn't able to fix it it has to work elsewhere!

    After a few years of more and more desperate searching for an unbreakable distribution I settled down with KXStudio. I realized that my attitude is wrong and I'm not helping to make things better. So instead of reinstalling my system as an ultimate fix, I started reporting bugs and providing feedback to developers.

    As for KXStudio that I'm using for a year now - I value it's powerful and convenient KDE desktop, fantastic set of cutting-edge tools available through it's own repositories, good support and custom applications that are developed for it.

    This article shows how to install, configure and play a simple software synthesizer amsynth on Raspberry Pi 2.

    The first part in this series is a quick installation and configuration guide for Raspbian Jessie Linux. Please consult these articles for background information. It is polyphonic 16 voices max. Each voice has two oscillators, a 12 or 24dB per octave resonant filter and dual ADSR envelope generators. All can be modulated using a low frequency oscillator LFO.

    The synth also has distortion and reverb effects. Read more about amsynth at the amsynth web site. When amsynth launches, it automatically searches for a JACK audio server. Run the following command to install amsynth: sudo apt-get install amsynth The package manager fetches amsynth and the libraries, etc.

    To repeat my initial experiment, start two terminal windows on the desktop. In the first window, run amsynth: amsynth Simple, huh? No command line arguments to mess with. You should see the amsynth front panel as shown in the image below. Notice the status at the bottom of the amsynth front panel. Use aconnect, again, to patch the Keystation to amsynth: aconnect ALSA ports are identified by client and client-specific port number.

    The first port in the command line above is the sender port and the second port is the receiver port. Enter aconnect -l to display port and connection status. Hit the keys on the Keystation and amsynth plays the notes. Turn the virtual knobs while holding a note. Twist MIDI controller knobs and watch amsynth track the changes. If you followed these directions and played amsynth with a MIDI keyboard of your own, you probably noticed the latency lag between striking a key and hearing a sound.

    JACK is a server that runs as a separate Linux process. Just in case you see this term when reading supplementary articles on the Web. Launch qjackctl. Change JACK settings, if necessary. Start the JACK server. Launch amsynth or other JACK-aware application. Make connections in qjackctl or ALSA. Full disclosure, I first started JACK from the command line using a variety of suggested options and had only limited success.

    I got a few runtime errors along the way and the latency was unacceptably long. These first experiments produced one useful tip: Add yourself to the Linux audio group. The notion of a group in Linux is similar to the different classes of users that you find on a different operating system, e.

    Users belonging to the audio group have special rights which improve the performance of realtime applications like a soft synthesizer. These rights include the ability to reserve and lock down memory and to run time-critical operations at a higher priority. The Raspbian Jessie image comes equipped with the audio group. The command: sudo groupadd audio adds the audio group. You will need to define the rights and privileges for the audio group — an expert task that I will not explain here.

    See the references at the bottom of this page for more details. The next step is vital to your sanity. Log out. Log all the way out. If you logged in from the text shell and started the X Windows system, then leave X Windows and log out from the text shell. Then, log back in. Run groups and the system should now show you as a member of the audio group. Group membership is established and inherited when you log in.

    Fortunately, JACK has a graphical control panel called qjackctl. The control panel uses the cross-platform Qt graphical user interface GUI package which supplies all of the buttons, drop-down lists and so forth. It tells the Linux shell to run qjackctl and detach the control panel from the terminal window. This leave the terminal window live and ready to accept new commands.

    The qjackctl control panel is shown in the following image. Click the Setup button in order to make a few small changes. Change the Sample Rate parameter to Hz, which is the rate prefered by amsynth.

    If the number of periods is less than 4, you will probably hear noisy, glitchy audio. Please see the settings that I used in the following image.

    Click images to get full resolution. Now launch amsynth: amsynth The soft synth will search for the JACK audio server and should connect to it. They each have similar capabilities and allow you to make connections between MIDI and audio ports. The main difference is persistence or lack thereof. Connections are temporary and are broken when a client is terminated.

    Connections are forgotten when the JACK server is terminated, too. The Patchbay lets you define, save and load port-to-port connections in a file. JACK needs to be running first, of course.

    I made connections using both techniques just for fun. The image below is a snapshot of the Connections dialog box. There are three tabs — one for each type of connection port.

    To make a connection, just select a sender in the left column and a receiver in the right column. If you terminate amsynth or JACK, the connection is lost and forgotten.

    Click the New button. Use the appropriate Add button to add output sockets to the left column or to add input sockets to the right column. Then, choose two ports and click the Connect button. After making connections, save the set-up to a file. The interface is intuitive. You can save and load as many different set-ups as you would like as long as there is free drive space!

    Use ls -a to show all files in a directory including the hidden ones. This, by the way, is your home directory. Linux applications typically store configurations in hidden files within your home directory.

    The one aspect that qjackctl does not handle well is the deletion of Patchbay set-up files. If you delete or move the XML file, then you will get a warning message like: Could not load active patchbay definition. At this point, you should be able to play amsynth from an external MIDI controller with acceptable latency.

    Have fun! Here are the links.

    The Raspbian Jessie image comes equipped with the audio group. The command: sudo groupadd audio adds the audio group. You will need to define the rights and privileges for the audio group — an expert task that I will not explain here. See the references at the bottom of this page for more details. The next step is vital to your sanity. Log out. Log all the way out.

    If you logged in from the text shell and started the X Windows system, then leave X Windows and log out from the text shell. Then, log back in. Run groups and the system should now show you as a member of the audio group.

    Group membership is established and inherited when you log in.

    $50 Open-Source MIDI Controller, The Chomp, Looks Awesome

    Fortunately, JACK has a graphical control panel called qjackctl. The control panel uses the cross-platform Qt graphical user interface GUI package which supplies all of the buttons, drop-down lists and so forth. It tells the Linux shell to run qjackctl and detach the control panel from the terminal window. This leave the terminal window live and ready to accept new commands. The qjackctl control panel is shown in the following image. Click the Setup button in order to make a few small changes.

    Change the Sample Rate parameter to Hz, which is the rate prefered by amsynth. If the number of periods is less than 4, you will probably hear noisy, glitchy audio.

    Open Music Lab’s Projects and Tools

    Please see the settings that I used in the following image. Click images to get full resolution. Now launch amsynth: amsynth The soft synth will search for the JACK audio server and should connect to it. They each have similar capabilities and allow you to make connections between MIDI and audio ports. The main difference is persistence or lack thereof. Connections are temporary and are broken when a client is terminated. Connections are forgotten when the JACK server is terminated, too.

    The Patchbay lets you define, save and load port-to-port connections in a file. JACK needs to be running first, of course. I made connections using both techniques just for fun. The image below is a snapshot of the Connections dialog box.

    There are three tabs — one for each type of connection port. To make a connection, just select a sender in the left column and a receiver in the right column.

    If you terminate amsynth or JACK, the connection is lost and forgotten. Click the New button.

    How you can Convert a MIDI Port to USB (3 Steps)

    Use the appropriate Add button to add output sockets to the left column or to add input sockets to the right column. Then, choose two ports and click the Connect button. After making connections, save the set-up to a file. The interface is intuitive.

    You can save and load as many different set-ups as you would like as long as there is free drive space! Use ls -a to show all files in a directory including the hidden ones. This, by the way, is your home directory. Select the midi file you want to convert in the iTunes window. Now you can copy the file to an MP3 player or to a CD.

    Step 1. Step 2. The uploading speed may be slow depending on the network condition and file size. Step 3. Step 4. Cut the Gameport end off of the joystick about 3 inches 7. Do the same with the spare USB 2. Strip the rubber shields off both wires to reveal the true wires underneath the rubber and foil shields. Sorry forgot a picture for this step.


    Arduino midi patchbay