Job safety analysis for electrical and instrumentation


  • Behavior-Based Safety
  • Electrical Safety Equipment
  • Our Courses
  • Job Safety Analysis JSA (Full Article)
  • Basic Level 1 Rigging Safety Job Safety Analysis accomplishment Scissors and boom lift operator certification training NFPA 70E — Electrical Safety in the Workplace training Journeymen and Foremen receive specific training on responsibilities for safe and successful job accomplishment and leadership in the field Continuous Safety Training MKD Electric administers a three year rotational annual safety training regimen for all field electricians and apprentices.

    These subjects are also address throughout the years with applicable tool box talks and safety huddles. This course is designed to meet the OSHA standard requirement that Fork Lift certified personnel to be evaluated every three years. First Aid and CPR certification. Additional topics of concern are added to each of these years as time permits. We focus on leading indicators such as: pre-job safety analyses JSEs , site specific safety, health and environmental procedures, daily job safety analyses JSAs , and root-cause analyses of near-hits.

    How Do we Reinforce our behavior-based safety program? Safety, health, and environmental conscientiousness is the responsibility of every team member and is the top priority in every task.

    All team members are empowered to stop a job for safety concerns. Safety interventions are routinely reinforced and encouraged. Continuous training, observation, coaching, and reinforcement.

    This includes site safety audits. An effective substance abuse program. A comprehensive written safety program. Accountability for safety and health performance at every level. Weekly safety call attended by all project leaders to discuss current safety issues and concerns. Retraining where necessary. Weekly safety-focused toolbox talks. A monthly, company-wide newsletter with a safety article written by the Director of HR. A company safety committee. All of our team members complete a Job Safety Analysis form prior to performing every project or task.

    We operate in some of the most challenging industrial settings, and maintain rigorous safety standards to ensure a safe working environment for our team. Our team members are re-certified every three years for arc flash and shock protection and safe work practices.

    Facebook Twitter LinkedIn Messenger Messenger WhatsApp Telegram Print Job Safety Analysis JSA is a safety management tool in which the risks or hazards of a specific job in the workplace are identified, and then measures to eliminate or control those hazards are determined and implemented. More specifically, a job safety analysis is a process of systematically evaluating certain jobs, tasks, processes or procedures and eliminating or reducing the risks or hazards to as low as reasonably practical ALARP in order to protect workers from injury or illness.

    The JSA process is documented and the JSA document is used in the workplace or at the job site to guide workers in safe job performance. The JSA document is also a living document that is adjusted as conditions warrant. The JSA process begins with identification of the potential hazards or risks associated with a particular job. Once the hazards are understood, the consequences of those hazards are then identified, followed by control measures to eliminate or mitigate the hazards.

    A more detailed JSA can be performed by breaking the job into steps and identifying specific hazards and control measures for each job step, providing the worker with a documented set of safe job procedures. Some JSA processes also include a risk assessment that lists the probability of each hazard occurring and the severity of the consequences, as well as the effectiveness of the control measures. The purpose of a conducting and writing a JSA is to better understand the hazards of a particular procedure, so you can take steps to mitigate them.

    When performed correctly, JSAs also promote better safety communication and engagement among management and employees. Step 2: Break the Job Into Steps The second step is to take the job procedure under analysis and break it into steps. The best way to do this is to observe an employee as he or she is doing the job, and some people even find it helpful to take video for review.

    Your goal should be to break it down into manageable chunks. The general rule of thumb is 10 or fewer steps. Step 3: Identify Hazards At this point, you need to look at each step and pinpoint what could go wrong at each point. Step 4: Implement Solutions For each hazard, you should identify controls that mitigate the risk of a safety incident. Potential measures include using a different process altogether, modifying the process or tools, substituting materials and adapting the work environment such as improving ventilation.

    This could mean adding steps or changing them around. Step 6: Review and Update A JSA should be a dynamic document that management and employees collaborate on to review and update regularly. This can help you identify whether you have a gap in the JSA, or whether an employee needs additional training.

    When all is said and done, a JSA is only as good as the effort you put into it.

    The JSA process is documented and the JSA document is used in the workplace or at the job site to guide workers in safe job performance.

    Behavior-Based Safety

    The JSA document is also a living document that is adjusted as conditions warrant. The JSA process begins with identification of the potential hazards or risks associated with a particular job. Once the hazards are understood, the consequences of those hazards are then identified, followed by control measures to eliminate or mitigate the hazards.

    A more detailed JSA can be performed by breaking the job into steps and identifying specific hazards and control measures for each job step, providing the worker with a documented set of safe job procedures. Some JSA processes also include a risk assessment that lists the probability of each hazard occurring and the severity of the consequences, as well as the effectiveness of the control measures.

    The purpose of a conducting and writing a JSA is to better understand the hazards of a particular procedure, so you can take steps to mitigate them.

    Electrical Safety Equipment

    When performed correctly, JSAs also promote better safety communication and engagement among management and employees. Step 2: Break the Job Into Steps The second step is to take the job procedure under analysis and break it into steps.

    The best way to do this is to observe an employee as he or she is doing the job, and some people even find it helpful to take video for review. Safety interventions are routinely reinforced and encouraged.

    Our Courses

    Continuous training, observation, coaching, and reinforcement. This includes site safety audits. An effective substance abuse program. A comprehensive written safety program. Accountability for safety and health performance at every level.

    Job Safety Analysis JSA (Full Article)

    Weekly safety call attended by all project leaders to discuss current safety issues and concerns. Retraining where necessary. Weekly safety-focused toolbox talks. A monthly, company-wide newsletter with a safety article written by the Director of HR. A company safety committee.


    Job safety analysis for electrical and instrumentation