Abiotic vs biotic factors answers


  • Abiotic vs. Biotic Factors in an Ecosystem
  • Biotic factor
  • Pin0 At the end of this comprehensive abiotic and biotic factors lesson plan, students will be able to describe biotic and abiotic parts of an ecosystem in which organisms interact. Students will also be able to investigate how organisms and populations in an ecosystem depend on and may compete for biotic and abiotic factors. Each lesson is designed using the 5E method of instruction to ensure maximum comprehension by the students. The following post will walk you through each of the steps and activities from the abiotic and biotic factors lesson plan.

    Students will learn about how organisms and populations in ecosystems depend on many factors in order to survive. After the teacher and students will discuss the objectives and some of the relevant vocabulary using the included objective statements and word wall cards. The engagement activity continues with a Think-Pair-Share activity to discuss what the students discovered or realized during the game.

    The teacher will help to clear any misconceptions about only biotic factors affecting the success of the ecosystem, ecosystems change little over time, and how species coexist in ecosystems because of their compatible needs and behaviors with other species. Four of the stations are considered input stations where students are learning new information about abiotic and biotic factors, and four of the stations are output stations where students will be demonstrating their mastery of the input stations.

    Each of the stations is differentiated to challenge students using a different learning style. You can read more about how I set up the station labs here. Students will be working in pairs to sort a number of cards into 2 piles. Students will make connections to the piles they are creating and how they represent both abiotic and biotic factors. Once students have completed the sort, they will then be asked to think about a certain ecosystem and list a few abiotic and biotic factors.

    At this station, students will be watching a 2 and a half minute video describing abiotic and biotic factors. The video will give the students a quick description of what abiotic and biotic factors are. The video will then show students how these two factors interact and depend on one another. Students will then answer questions related to the video and record their answers on their lab station sheet. The research station will allow students to get online and interact with an online resource created by TEA Texas Education Agency.

    Students will be learning about competition, limiting factors, and carrying capacity. With each concept, students will answer a few questions to help make the research more concrete. This station will provide students with a one page reading about limiting factors and carrying capacity.

    In the reading students will discover how abiotic factors and biotic factors depend on each other otherwise the ecosystem can change. Students will then answer 4 multiple choice questions pertaining to the reading, for example, how a decrease in abiotic factors affect population growth, and what determines carrying capacity.

    The assess it station is where students will go to prove mastery over the concepts they learned in the lab. The questions are set up in a standardized format with multiple choice answers.

    Some questions include asking to identify abiotic factors, to determine which factors are considered abiotic, which abiotic factor do plants have to compete for, and finally to validate a statement as true. Students who can answer open-ended questions about the lab truly understand the concepts that are being taught. At this station, the students will be answering three questions like to compare the terms abiotic and biotic and provide examples. Explain situations where two different species compete for the same abiotic resource.

    Finally, students will have to infer what life would be like in the Sahara when the abiotic resource, water, has become very limited. Your visual students will love this station. Students will be illustrating a number of abiotic and biotic factors in a forest ecosystem.

    Along with this illustration, students must also show how these factors interact and show some sort of competition. The organize it station allows your students to use a manipulative to match information provided to either abiotic factors or biotic factors.

    During the explanation piece, the teacher will be clearing up any misconceptions about abiotic and biotic factors with an interactive PowerPoint, anchor charts, and interactive notebook activities.

    The abiotic and biotic factor lesson includes a PowerPoint with activities scattered throughout to keep the students engaged. The students will also be interacting with their journals using INB templates for abiotic and biotic factors.

    Each INB activity is designed to help students compartmentalize information for a greater understanding of the concept. The abiotic and biotic factors INB template will challenge the students to understand and visualize the expansion of the universe.

    Each of the abiotic and biotic factors projects will allow students to explain the interaction between abiotic and biotic factors. Included in every 5E lesson is a homework assignment, assessment, and modified assessment.

    Research has shown that homework needs to be meaningful and applicable to real-world activities in order to be effective. Save yourself a ton of time and grab it now.

    Module Ecology of Living Things Search for: Biotic and Abiotic Factors Distinguish between abiotic and biotic components of the environment Many forces influence the communities of living organisms present in different parts of the biosphere all of the parts of Earth inhabited by life. The biosphere extends into the atmosphere several kilometers above Earth and into the depths of the oceans.

    Despite its apparent vastness to an individual human, the biosphere occupies only a minute space when compared to the known universe. Many abiotic forces influence where life can exist and the types of organisms found in different parts of the biosphere. The abiotic factors influence the distribution of climates, flora, and fauna. Learning Objectives Define the term biogeography and the abiotic factors that impact it Discuss how abiotic factors affect species distribution Identify ways energy sources impact the biotic factors of biogeography Identify ways temperature impacts the biotic factors of biogeography Identify abiotic factors that impact plant growth Identify other abiotic factors that impact the biogeography of our world Biogeography Biogeography is the study of the geographic distribution of living things and the abiotic factors that affect their distribution.

    Abiotic factors such as temperature and rainfall vary based mainly on latitude and elevation. As these abiotic factors change, the composition of plant and animal communities also changes. For example, if you were to begin a journey at the equator and walk north, you would notice gradual changes in plant communities. At the beginning of your journey, you would see tropical wet forests with broad-leaved evergreen trees, which are characteristic of plant communities found near the equator.

    As you continued to travel north, you would see these broad-leaved evergreen plants eventually give rise to seasonally dry forests with scattered trees. You would also begin to notice changes in temperature and moisture.

    At about 30 degrees north, these forests would give way to deserts, which are characterized by low precipitation. Moving farther north, you would see that deserts are replaced by grasslands or prairies.

    Eventually, grasslands are replaced by deciduous temperate forests. These deciduous forests give way to the boreal forests found in the subarctic, the area south of the Arctic Circle. Finally, you would reach the Arctic tundra, which is found at the most northern latitudes. This trek north reveals gradual changes in both climate and the types of organisms that have adapted to environmental factors associated with ecosystems found at different latitudes.

    However, different ecosystems exist at the same latitude due in part to abiotic factors such as jet streams, the Gulf Stream, and ocean currents. If you were to hike up a mountain, the changes you would see in the vegetation would parallel those as you move to higher latitudes. Species Distribution Ecologists who study biogeography examine patterns of species distribution. No species exists everywhere; for example, the Venus flytrap is endemic to a small area in North and South Carolina.

    An endemic species is one which is naturally found only in a specific geographic area that is usually restricted in size. Other species are generalists: species which live in a wide variety of geographic areas; the raccoon, for example, is native to most of North and Central America. Species distribution patterns are based on biotic and abiotic factors and their influences during the very long periods of time required for species evolution; therefore, early studies of biogeography were closely linked to the emergence of evolutionary thinking in the eighteenth century.

    Some of the most distinctive assemblages of plants and animals occur in regions that have been physically separated for millions of years by geographic barriers. Biologists estimate that Australia, for example, has between , and , species of plants and animals.

    Figure 1. Australia is home to many endemic species. The a wallaby Wallabia bicolor , a medium-sized member of the kangaroo family, is a pouched mammal, or marsupial. The b echidna Tachyglossus aculeatus is an egg-laying mammal. Hawaii, for example, has no native land species of reptiles or amphibians, and has only one native terrestrial mammal, the hoary bat. Most of New Guinea, as another example, lacks placental mammals. Check out this video to observe a platypus swimming in its natural habitat in New South Wales, Australia.

    Note that this video has no narration. Isolated land masses—such as Australia, Hawaii, and Madagascar—often have large numbers of endemic plant species. Some of these plants are endangered due to human activity. The forest gardenia Gardenia brighamii , for instance, is endemic to Hawaii; only an estimated 15—20 trees are thought to exist. Energy Sources Figure 2. The spring beauty is an ephemeral spring plant that flowers early in the spring to avoid competing with larger forest trees for sunlight.

    These organisms convert solar energy into the chemical energy needed by all living things. Light availability can be an important force directly affecting the evolution of adaptations in photosynthesizers. For instance, plants in the understory of a temperate forest are shaded when the trees above them in the canopy completely leaf out in the late spring.

    Not surprisingly, understory plants have adaptations to successfully capture available light. One such adaptation is the rapid growth of spring ephemeral plants such as the spring beauty Figure 2. These spring flowers achieve much of their growth and finish their life cycle reproduce early in the season before the trees in the canopy develop leaves.

    In aquatic ecosystems, the availability of light may be limited because sunlight is absorbed by water, plants, suspended particles, and resident microorganisms. Toward the bottom of a lake, pond, or ocean, there is a zone that light cannot reach. Photosynthesis cannot take place there and, as a result, a number of adaptations have evolved that enable living things to survive without light. For instance, aquatic plants have photosynthetic tissue near the surface of the water; for example, think of the broad, floating leaves of a water lily—water lilies cannot survive without light.

    In environments such as hydrothermal vents, some bacteria extract energy from inorganic chemicals because there is no light for photosynthesis. Figure 3. Ocean upwelling is an important process that recycles nutrients and energy in the ocean. As wind green arrows pushes offshore, it causes water from the ocean bottom red arrows to move to the surface, bringing up nutrients from the ocean depths.

    The availability of nutrients in aquatic systems is also an important aspect of energy or photosynthesis. Many organisms sink to the bottom of the ocean when they die in the open water; when this occurs, the energy found in that living organism is sequestered for some time unless ocean upwelling occurs. Ocean upwelling is the rising of deep ocean waters that occurs when prevailing winds blow along surface waters near a coastline Figure 3.

    As the wind pushes ocean waters offshore, water from the bottom of the ocean moves up to replace this water. As a result, the nutrients once contained in dead organisms become available for reuse by other living organisms. In freshwater systems, the recycling of nutrients occurs in response to air temperature changes. The nutrients at the bottom of lakes are recycled twice each year: in the spring and fall turnover. The spring and fall turnover is a seasonal process that recycles nutrients and oxygen from the bottom of a freshwater ecosystem to the top of a body of water.

    These turnovers are caused by the formation of a thermocline: a layer of water with a temperature that is significantly different from that of the surrounding layers.

    In wintertime, the surface of lakes found in many northern regions is frozen. The deepest water is oxygen poor because the decomposition of organic material at the bottom of the lake uses up available oxygen that cannot be replaced by means of oxygen diffusion into the water due to the surface ice layer. Figure 4. The spring and fall turnovers are important processes in freshwater lakes that act to move the nutrients and oxygen at the bottom of deep lakes to the top.

    Surface water temperature changes as the seasons progress, and denser water sinks. Practice Question How might turnover in tropical lakes differ from turnover in lakes that exist in temperate regions? However, stratification does occur, as well as seasonal turnover. In springtime, air temperatures increase and surface ice melts. The water at the bottom of the lake is then displaced by the heavier surface water and, thus, rises to the top.

    As that water rises to the top, the sediments and nutrients from the lake bottom are brought along with it. During the summer months, the lake water stratifies, or forms layers of temperature, with the warmest water at the lake surface.

    The oxygen-rich water at the surface of the lake then moves to the bottom of the lake, while the nutrients at the bottom of the lake rise to the surface. During the winter, the oxygen at the bottom of the lake is used by decomposers and other organisms requiring oxygen, such as fish.

    Temperature Figure 5. This colorful hot spring in Yellowstone National Park, located in Midway Geyser Basin, is the largest hot spring in the United States and the third largest in the world. Its rich color is the result of thermophilic organisms living along the edges of the hot spring, Temperature affects the physiology of living things as well as the density and state of water.

    Enzymes are most efficient within a narrow and specific range of temperatures; enzyme degradation can occur at higher temperatures.

    Therefore, organisms either must maintain an internal temperature or they must inhabit an environment that will keep the body within a temperature range that supports metabolism. Some animals have adapted to enable their bodies to survive significant temperature fluctuations, such as seen in hibernation or reptilian torpor.

    Similarly, some bacteria are adapted to surviving in extremely hot temperatures such as geysers. Such bacteria are examples of extremophiles: organisms that thrive in extreme environments.

    Temperature can limit the distribution of living things. Animals faced with temperature fluctuations may respond with adaptations, such as migration, in order to survive. Migration, the movement from one place to another, is an adaptation found in many animals, including many that inhabit seasonally cold climates. Migration solves problems related to temperature, locating food, and finding a mate. In migration, for instance, the Arctic Tern Sterna paradisaea makes a 40, km 24, mi round trip flight each year between its feeding grounds in the southern hemisphere and its breeding grounds in the Arctic Ocean.

    Monarch butterflies Danaus plexippus live in the eastern United States in the warmer months and migrate to Mexico and the southern United States in the wintertime. Some species of mammals also make migratory forays. Reindeer Rangifer tarandus travel about 5, km 3, mi each year to find food. Amphibians and reptiles are more limited in their distribution because they lack migratory ability. Not all animals that can migrate do so: migration carries risk and comes at a high energy cost. Figure 6.

    Chipmunks hibernate for the winter, but they come out of sleep every few days to eat. Some animals hibernate or estivate to survive hostile temperatures. Hibernation enables animals to survive cold conditions, and estivation allows animals to survive the hostile conditions of a hot, dry climate. Animals that hibernate or estivate enter a state known as torpor: a condition in which their metabolic rate is significantly lowered.

    Abiotic factors such as temperature and rainfall vary based mainly on latitude and elevation. As these abiotic factors change, the composition of plant and animal communities also changes. For example, if you were to begin a journey at the equator and walk north, you would notice gradual changes in plant communities. At the beginning of your journey, you would see tropical wet forests with broad-leaved evergreen trees, which are characteristic of plant communities found near the equator.

    As you continued to travel north, you would see these broad-leaved evergreen plants eventually give rise to seasonally dry forests with scattered trees. You would also begin to notice changes in temperature and moisture.

    At about 30 degrees north, these forests would give way to deserts, which are characterized by low precipitation. Moving farther north, you would see that deserts are replaced by grasslands or prairies. Eventually, grasslands are replaced by deciduous temperate forests. These deciduous forests give way to the boreal forests found in the subarctic, the area south of the Arctic Circle. Finally, you would reach the Arctic tundra, which is found at the most northern latitudes. This trek north reveals gradual changes in both climate and the types of organisms that have adapted to environmental factors associated with ecosystems found at different latitudes.

    However, different ecosystems exist at the same latitude due in part to abiotic factors such as jet streams, the Gulf Stream, and ocean currents. If you were to hike up a mountain, the changes you would see in the vegetation would parallel those as you move to higher latitudes. Species Distribution Ecologists who study biogeography examine patterns of species distribution. No species exists everywhere; for example, the Venus flytrap is endemic to a small area in North and South Carolina.

    An endemic species is one which is naturally found only in a specific geographic area that is usually restricted in size. Other species are generalists: species which live in a wide variety of geographic areas; the raccoon, for example, is native to most of North and Central America. Species distribution patterns are based on biotic and abiotic factors and their influences during the very long periods of time required for species evolution; therefore, early studies of biogeography were closely linked to the emergence of evolutionary thinking in the eighteenth century.

    Some of the most distinctive assemblages of plants and animals occur in regions that have been physically separated for millions of years by geographic barriers. Biologists estimate that Australia, for example, has betweenandspecies of plants and animals.

    Figure 1. Australia is home to many endemic species. The a wallaby Wallabia bicolora medium-sized member of the kangaroo family, is a pouched mammal, or marsupial. The b echidna Tachyglossus aculeatus is an egg-laying mammal. Hawaii, for example, has no native land species of reptiles or amphibians, and has only one native terrestrial mammal, the hoary bat.

    Most of New Guinea, as another example, lacks placental mammals. Check out this video to observe a platypus swimming in its natural habitat in New South Wales, Australia.

    Note that this video has no narration. Isolated land masses—such as Australia, Hawaii, and Madagascar—often have large numbers of endemic plant species.

    Some of these plants are endangered due to human activity. The forest gardenia Gardenia brighamiifor instance, is endemic to Hawaii; only an estimated 15—20 trees are thought to exist. Energy Sources Figure 2. The spring beauty is an ephemeral spring plant that flowers early in the spring to avoid competing with larger forest trees for sunlight.

    Abiotic vs. Biotic Factors in an Ecosystem

    These organisms convert solar energy into the chemical energy needed by all living things. Light availability can be an important force directly affecting the evolution of adaptations in photosynthesizers. For instance, plants in the understory of a temperate forest are shaded when the trees above them in the canopy completely leaf out in the late spring.

    Not surprisingly, understory plants have adaptations to successfully capture available light. One such adaptation is the rapid growth of spring ephemeral plants such as the spring beauty Figure 2. These spring flowers achieve much of their growth and finish their life cycle reproduce early in the season before the trees in the canopy develop leaves. In aquatic ecosystems, the availability of light may be limited because sunlight is absorbed by water, plants, suspended particles, and resident microorganisms.

    Toward the bottom of a lake, pond, or ocean, there is a zone that light cannot reach. Photosynthesis cannot take place there and, as a result, a number of adaptations have evolved that enable living things to survive without light. For instance, aquatic plants have photosynthetic tissue near the surface of the water; for example, think of the broad, floating leaves of a water lily—water lilies cannot survive without light. In environments such as hydrothermal vents, some bacteria extract energy from inorganic chemicals because there is no light for photosynthesis.

    Figure 3. Ocean upwelling is an important process that recycles nutrients and energy in the ocean. As wind green arrows pushes offshore, it causes water from the ocean bottom red arrows to move to the surface, bringing up nutrients from the ocean depths.

    The availability of nutrients in aquatic systems is also an important aspect of energy or photosynthesis. Many organisms sink to the bottom of the ocean when they die in the open water; when this occurs, the energy found in that living organism is sequestered for some time unless ocean upwelling occurs.

    Ocean upwelling is the rising of deep ocean waters that occurs when prevailing winds blow along surface waters near a coastline Figure 3. As the wind pushes ocean waters offshore, water from the bottom of the ocean moves up to replace this water.

    As a result, the nutrients once contained in dead organisms become available for reuse by other living organisms. In freshwater systems, the recycling of nutrients occurs in response to air temperature changes. The nutrients at the bottom of lakes are recycled twice each year: in the spring and fall turnover. The spring and fall turnover is a seasonal process that recycles nutrients and oxygen from the bottom of a freshwater ecosystem to the top of a body of water. These turnovers are caused by the formation of a thermocline: a layer of water with a temperature that is significantly different from that of the surrounding layers.

    In wintertime, the surface of lakes found in many northern regions is frozen. The deepest water is oxygen poor because the decomposition of organic material at the bottom of the lake uses up available oxygen that cannot be replaced by means of oxygen diffusion into the water due to the surface ice layer.

    Biotic factor

    Figure 4. The spring and fall turnovers are important processes in freshwater lakes that act to move the nutrients and oxygen at the bottom of deep lakes to the top.

    Surface water temperature changes as the seasons progress, and denser water sinks. Practice Question How might turnover in tropical lakes differ from turnover in lakes that exist in temperate regions? However, stratification does occur, as well as seasonal turnover. In springtime, air temperatures increase and surface ice melts. The water at the bottom of the lake is then displaced by the heavier surface water and, thus, rises to the top.

    As that water rises to the top, the sediments and nutrients from the lake bottom are brought along with it. During the summer months, the lake water stratifies, or forms layers of temperature, with the warmest water at the lake surface.

    The oxygen-rich water at the surface of the lake then moves to the bottom of the lake, while ire iren yaduwar harshe nutrients at the bottom of the lake rise to the surface.

    During the winter, the oxygen at the bottom of the lake is used by decomposers and other organisms requiring oxygen, such as fish. Temperature Figure 5.

    This colorful hot spring in Yellowstone National Park, located in Midway Geyser Basin, is the largest hot spring in the United States and the third largest in the world. Its rich color is the result of thermophilic organisms living along the edges of the hot spring, Temperature affects the physiology of living things as well as the density and state of water.

    Enzymes are most efficient within a narrow and specific range of temperatures; enzyme degradation can occur at higher temperatures. Therefore, organisms either must maintain an internal temperature or they must inhabit an environment that will keep the body within a temperature range that supports metabolism.

    Some animals have adapted to enable their bodies to survive significant temperature fluctuations, such as seen in hibernation or reptilian torpor. The following post will walk you through each of the steps and activities from the abiotic and biotic factors lesson plan.

    Students will learn about how organisms and populations in ecosystems depend on many factors in order to survive. After the teacher and students will discuss the objectives and some of the relevant vocabulary using the included objective statements and word wall cards.

    The engagement activity continues with a Think-Pair-Share activity to discuss what the students discovered or realized during the game. The teacher will help to clear any misconceptions about only biotic factors affecting the success of the ecosystem, ecosystems change little over time, and how species coexist in ecosystems because of their compatible needs and behaviors with other species.

    Four of the stations are considered input stations where students are learning new information about abiotic and biotic factors, and four of the stations are output stations where students will be demonstrating their mastery of the input stations. Each of the stations is differentiated to challenge students using a different learning style. You can read more about how I set up the station labs here.

    Students will be working in pairs to sort a number of cards into 2 piles. Students will make connections to the piles they are creating and how they represent both abiotic and biotic factors. Once students have completed the sort, they will then be asked to think about a certain ecosystem and list a few abiotic and biotic factors. At this station, students will be watching a 2 and a half minute video describing abiotic and biotic factors. The video will give the students a quick description of what abiotic and biotic factors are.

    The video will then show students how these two factors interact and depend on one another. Students will then answer questions related to the video and record their answers on their lab station sheet.

    The research station will allow students to get online and interact with an online resource created by TEA Texas Education Agency. Students will be learning about competition, limiting factors, and carrying capacity. With each concept, students will answer a few questions to help make the research more concrete. This station will provide students with a one page reading about limiting factors and carrying capacity.

    In the reading students will discover how abiotic factors and biotic factors depend on each other otherwise the ecosystem can change. Students will then answer 4 multiple choice questions pertaining to the reading, for example, how a decrease in abiotic factors affect population growth, and what determines carrying capacity. The assess it station is where students will go to prove mastery over the concepts they learned in the lab.


    Abiotic vs biotic factors answers