Indeed written communication assessment answers


  • How do I know if I passed my Indeed assessment?
  • Nursing Care Plans (NCP): Ultimate Guide and Database
  • Applying for jobs on Indeed? You may need to take a test first
  • How to ace a writing assessment test
  • Reading Heidegger: The Question Concerning Technology
  • How do I know if I passed my Indeed assessment?

    References and Sources What is a nursing care plan? A nursing care plan NCP is a formal process that correctly identifies existing needs and recognizes potential needs or risks. Care plans provide communication among nurses, their patients, and other healthcare providers to achieve health care outcomes. Without the nursing care planning process, the quality and consistency of patient care would be lost. Planning and delivering individualized or patient-centered care is the basis for excellence in nursing practice.

    Formal care plans are further subdivided into standardized care plans and individualized care plans: Standardized care plans specify the nursing care for groups of clients with everyday needs. Individualized care plans are tailored to meet the unique needs of a specific client or needs that are not addressed by the standardized care plan.

    Objectives The following are the goals and objectives of writing a nursing care plan: Promote evidence-based nursing care and to render pleasant and familiar conditions in hospitals or health centers. Support holistic care which involves the whole person including physical, psychological, social and spiritual in relation to management and prevention of the disease. Establish programs such as care pathways and care bundles. Care pathways involve a team effort in order to come to a consensus with regards to standards of care and expected outcomes while care bundles are related to best practice with regards to care given for a specific disease.

    Identify and distinguish goals and expected outcome. Review communication and documentation of the care plan. Measure nursing care. Provides direction for individualized care of the client. It allows the nurse to think critically about each client and to develop interventions that are directly tailored to the individual. Continuity of care.

    Nurses from different shifts or different floors can use the data to render the same quality and type of interventions to care for clients, therefore allowing clients to receive the most benefit from treatment. It should accurately outline which observations to make, what nursing actions to carry out, and what instructions the client or family members require.

    If nursing care is not documented correctly in the care plan, there is no evidence the care was provided. Serves as guide for assigning a specific staff to a specific client. Serves as guide for reimbursement.

    The medical record is used by the insurance companies to determine what they will pay in relation to the hospital care received by the client. It does not only benefit nurses but also the clients by involving them in their own treatment and care. Components A nursing care plan NCP usually includes nursing diagnoses, client problems, expected outcomes, and nursing interventions and rationales. These components are elaborated below: Client health assessment , medical results, and diagnostic reports.

    This is the first measure in order to be able to design a care plan. Information in this area can be subjective and objective. Expected client outcomes are outlined. These may be long and short term. Rationale for interventions in order to be evidence-based care.

    This documents the outcome of nursing interventions. Care Plan Formats Nursing care plan formats are usually categorized or organized into four columns: 1 nursing diagnoses, 2 desired outcomes and goals, 3 nursing interventions, and 4 evaluation. Some agencies use a three-column plan wherein goals and evaluation are in the same column. Other agencies have a five-column plan that includes a column for assessment cues. Please feel free to edit, modify, and share the template. Download: Nursing Care Plan Templates and Formats Student Care Plans Student care plans are more lengthy and detailed than care plans used by working nurses because they are a learning activity for the students.

    Student nursing care plans are more detailed. Rationales are scientific principles that explain the reasons for selecting a particular nursing intervention. Just follow the steps below to develop a care plan for your client. Step 1: Data Collection or Assessment The first step in writing a nursing care plan is to create a client database using assessment techniques and data collection methods physical assessment, health history, interview, medical records review, diagnostic studies.

    A client database includes all the health information gathered. In this step, the nurse can identify the related or risk factors and defining characteristics that can be used to formulate a nursing diagnosis. Some agencies or nursing schools have their own assessment formats you can use.

    Step 3: Formulating Your Nursing Diagnoses NANDA nursing diagnoses are a uniform way of identifying, focusing on, and dealing with specific client needs and responses to actual and high-risk problems. Actual or potential health problems that can be prevented or resolved by independent nursing intervention are termed nursing diagnoses.

    In this step, the nurse and the client begin planning which nursing diagnosis requires attention first. Diagnoses can be ranked and grouped as having a high, medium, or low priority. Life-threatening problems should be given high priority. Involve the client in the process to enhance cooperation. Step 5: Establishing Client Goals and Desired Outcomes After assigning priorities for your nursing diagnosis, the nurse and the client set goals for each determined priority.

    Goals provide direction for planning interventions, serve as criteria for evaluating client progress, enable the client and nurse to determine which problems have been resolved, and help motivate the client and nurse by providing a sense of achievement.

    Example of goals and desired outcomes. One overall goal is determined for each nursing diagnosis. The terms goal, outcome, and expected outcome are often used interchangeably. Goals are constructed by focusing on problem prevention, resolution, and rehabilitation. Goals can be short-term or long-term. Long-term goals are often used for clients who have chronic health problems or live at home, in nursing homes, or in extended-care facilities. Short-term goal — a statement distinguishing a shift in behavior that can be completed immediately, usually within a few hours or days.

    Long-term goal — indicates an objective to be completed over a longer period, usually over weeks or months. Discharge planning — involves naming long-term goals, therefore promoting continued restorative care and problem resolution through home health, physical therapy, or various other referral sources. Components of Goals and Desired Outcomes Goals or desired outcome statements usually have four components: a subject, a verb, conditions or modifiers, and criterion of desired performance.

    Components of goals and desired outcomes in a nursing care plan. The subject is the client, any part of the client, or some attribute of the client i. That subject is often omitted in writing goals because it is assumed that the subject is the client unless indicated otherwise family, significant other. The verb specifies an action the client is to perform, for example, what the client is to do, learn, or experience.

    Conditions or modifiers. Criterion of desired performance. The criterion indicates the standard by which a performance is evaluated or the level at which the client will perform the specified behavior. These are optional. When writing goals and desired outcomes, the nurse should follow these tips: Write goals and outcomes in terms of client responses and not as activities of the nurse.

    Avoid writing goals on what the nurse hopes to accomplish, and focus on what the client will do. Use observable, measurable terms for outcomes. Avoid using vague words that require interpretation or judgment of the observer. Ensure that goals are compatible with the therapies of other professionals. Ensure that each goal is derived from only one nursing diagnosis.

    Keeping it this way facilitates evaluation of care by ensuring that planned nursing interventions are clearly related to the diagnosis set. Lastly, make sure that the client considers the goals important and values them to ensure cooperation. Step 6: Selecting Nursing Interventions Nursing interventions are activities or actions that a nurse performs to achieve client goals.

    Interventions chosen should focus on eliminating or reducing the etiology of the nursing diagnosis. In this step, nursing interventions are identified and written during the planning step of the nursing process; however, they are actually performed during the implementation step. Types of Nursing Interventions Nursing interventions can be independent, dependent, or collaborative: Types of nursing interventions in a care plan. Independent nursing interventions are activities that nurses are licensed to initiate based on their sound judgement and skills.

    Includes: ongoing assessment, emotional support, providing comfort, teaching, physical care, and making referrals to other health care professionals. Includes orders to direct the nurse to provide medications, intravenous therapy , diagnostic tests, treatments, diet, and activity or rest.

    Assessment and providing explanation while administering medical orders are also part of the dependent nursing interventions. Collaborative interventions are actions that the nurse carries out in collaboration with other health team members, such as physicians, social workers, dietitians, and therapists. These actions are developed in consultation with other health care professionals to gain their professional viewpoint.

    Achievable with the resources and time available. Inline with other therapies. Based on nursing knowledge and experience or knowledge from relevant sciences. When writing nursing interventions, follow these tips: Write the date and sign the plan.

    The date the plan is written is essential for evaluation, review, and future planning. Nursing interventions should be specific and clearly stated, beginning with an action verb indicating what the nurse is expected to do. Action verb starts the intervention and must be precise.

    Qualifiers of how, when, where, time, frequency, and amount provide the content of the planned activity. Step 7: Providing Rationale Rationales, also known as scientific explanations, explain why the nursing intervention was chosen for the NCP. Sample nursing interventions and rationale for a care plan NCP Rationales do not appear in regular care plans. They are included to assist nursing students in associating the pathophysiological and psychological principles with the selected nursing intervention.

    Nursing Care Plans (NCP): Ultimate Guide and Database

    Here are some basic writing assessment test tips… I once failed a personality test. In my series of tests — which were designed to gauge suitability for future promotion — the person who earned the highest score was widely viewed by staff as difficult and untrustworthy. Indeed he was. Fortunately, the company never did promote him, despite his stellar marks. A big part of succeeding at testing is knowing how to take it.

    Given that job testing seems to be growing , and that almost 90 percent of firms that do testing say they will not hire job seekers deficient in basic skills , here is some advice on how to ace a writing assessment test. First, such tests are likely to examine spelling.

    I know, this says nothing about intelligence — instead, it relates strictly to visual memory. I know that accommodate always has two Cs and two Ms and that gauge is spelled with the A first.

    Learn them! I had always thought it was bellweather, with an A. In such a riding, however, the winner typically belongs to the party that wins the entire election. Thus, the connection to weather made sense to me. Turns out, however, that a wether is a gelded castrated ram that wears a bell and thus leads his flock. Grammar is another skill that writing tests are likely to examine. Save time by focusing on the most common grammar errors. Between them they highlight 45 grammar errors.

    Some of the items on the two lists are the same but many are different. The most common error I spot in business writing relates to the misuse of affect vs. Grammar Girl Mignon Fogarty suggests an interesting way of learning the difference.

    The effect was eye-popping. Another aspect of writing that assessment tests are likely to measure relates to proofreading. How much skill do you have at that? The best tips for testing purposes are likely 6, 7 and The last one — reading your work aloud — is the most important and useful.

    This is because we all read faster when we read silently. Making yourself read aloud forces you to work at a pace better suited to proofreading. Ironically, many so-called writing tests may never ask you to write because they will be time consuming to mark , but if they do, you might want to consult this article.

    Its is a pronoun, and this means it must refer back to a noun. Even if you never have to take an assessment test lucky you!

    Brushing up on your spelling, grammar and proofreading are good ways to do that. This post first appeared on my blog on Oct. Have you ever had to take a writing assessment? See here to learn how to post as a guest. Some of my other posts that I thought you might like Post navigation.

    Applying for jobs on Indeed? You may need to take a test first

    Serves as guide for reimbursement. The medical record is used by the insurance companies to determine what they will pay in relation to the hospital care received by the client. It does not only benefit nurses but also the clients by involving them in their own treatment and care. Components A nursing care plan NCP usually includes nursing diagnoses, client problems, expected outcomes, and nursing interventions and rationales.

    These components are elaborated below: Client health assessmentmedical results, and diagnostic reports. This is the first measure in order to be able to design a care plan. Information in this area can be subjective and objective. Expected client outcomes are outlined.

    How to ace a writing assessment test

    These may be long and short term. Rationale for interventions in order to be evidence-based care. This documents the outcome of nursing interventions. Care Plan Formats Nursing care plan formats are usually categorized or organized into four columns: 1 nursing diagnoses, 2 desired outcomes and goals, 3 nursing interventions, and 4 evaluation. Some agencies use a three-column plan wherein goals and evaluation are in the same column.

    Other agencies have a five-column plan that includes a column for assessment cues. Please feel free to edit, modify, and share the template. Download: Nursing Care Plan Templates and Formats Student Care Plans Student care plans are more lengthy and detailed than care plans used by working nurses because they are a learning activity for the students.

    Student nursing care plans are more detailed. Rationales are scientific principles that explain the reasons for selecting a particular nursing intervention. Just follow the steps below to develop a care plan for your client. Step 1: Data Collection or Assessment The first step in writing a nursing care plan is to create a client database using assessment techniques and data collection methods physical assessment, health history, interview, medical records review, diagnostic studies.

    A client database includes all the health information gathered. In this step, the nurse can identify the related or risk factors and defining characteristics that can be used to formulate a nursing diagnosis.

    Some agencies or nursing schools have their own assessment formats you can use. Step 3: Formulating Your Nursing Diagnoses NANDA nursing diagnoses are a uniform way of identifying, focusing on, and dealing with specific client needs and responses to actual and high-risk problems. Actual or potential health problems that can be prevented or resolved by independent nursing intervention are termed nursing diagnoses.

    In this step, the nurse and the client begin planning which nursing diagnosis requires attention first. Diagnoses can be ranked and grouped as having a high, medium, or low priority.

    Life-threatening problems should be given high priority. Involve the client in the process to enhance cooperation. Step 5: Establishing Client Goals and Desired Outcomes After assigning priorities for your nursing diagnosis, the nurse and the client set goals for each determined priority.

    Goals provide direction for planning interventions, serve as criteria for evaluating client progress, enable the client and nurse to determine which problems have been resolved, and help motivate the client and nurse by providing a sense of achievement. Example of goals and desired outcomes.

    Reading Heidegger: The Question Concerning Technology

    One overall goal is determined for each nursing diagnosis. The terms goal, outcome, and expected outcome are often used interchangeably. Goals are constructed by focusing on problem prevention, resolution, and rehabilitation. Goals can be short-term or long-term.

    Long-term goals are often used for clients who have chronic health problems or live at home, in nursing homes, or in extended-care facilities. Short-term goal — a statement distinguishing a shift in behavior that can be completed immediately, usually within a few hours or days.

    Long-term goal — indicates an objective to be completed over a longer period, usually over weeks or months. Discharge planning — involves naming long-term goals, therefore promoting continued restorative care and problem resolution through home health, physical therapy, or various other referral sources. Components of Goals and Desired Outcomes Goals or desired outcome statements usually have four components: a subject, a verb, conditions or modifiers, and criterion of desired performance.

    Components of goals and desired outcomes in a nursing care plan. The subject is the client, any part of the client, or some attribute of the client i. That subject is often omitted in writing goals because it is assumed that the subject is the client unless indicated otherwise family, significant other.

    The verb specifies an action the client is to perform, for example, what the client is to do, learn, or experience. Conditions or modifiers. Criterion of desired performance. The criterion indicates the standard by which a performance is evaluated or the level at which the client will perform the specified behavior. These are optional. When writing goals and desired outcomes, the nurse should follow these tips: Write goals and outcomes in terms of client responses and not as activities of the nurse.

    Avoid writing goals on what the nurse hopes to accomplish, and focus on what the client will do. The whole complex of these contrivances is technology. Technology itself is a contrivance, or, in Latin, an instrumentum.

    The current conception of technology, according to which it is a means and a human activity, can therefore be called the instrumental and anthropological definition of technology. Who would ever deny that it is correct? It is in obvious conformity with what we are envisioning when we talk about technology.

    The instrumental definition of technology is indeed so uncannily correct that it even holds for modern technology, of which, in other respects, we maintain with some justification that it is, in contrast to the older handwork technology, something completely different and therefore new. Even the power plant g16a valve adjustment its turbines and generators is a man-made means to an end established by man.

    Even the jet aircraft and the high-frequency apparatus are means to ends. A radar station is of course less simple than a weather vane. To be sure, the construction of a high-frequency apparatus requires the interlocking of various processes of technical-industrial production.

    And certainly a sawmill in a secluded valley of the Black Forest is a primitive means compared with the hydroelectric plant in the Rhine River. But this much remains correct: modern technology too is a means to an end. That is why the instrumental conception of technology conditions every attempt to bring man into the right relation to technology. Everything depends on our manipulating technology in the proper manner as a means. The will to mastery becomes all the more urgent the more technology threatens to slip from human control.

    But suppose now that technology were no mere means, how would it stand with the will to master it? Yet we said, did we not, that the instrumental definition of technology is correct? To be sure. The correct always fixes upon something pertinent in whatever is under consideration. However, in order to be correct, this fixing by no means needs to uncover the thing in question in its essence.

    Only at the point where such an uncovering happens does the true come to pass. For that reason the merely correct is not yet the true. Only the true brings us into a free relationship with that which concerns us from out of its essence. In order that we may arrive at this, or at least come close to it, we must seek the true by way of the correct.


    Indeed written communication assessment answers