Passing blood clots in early pregnancy


  • Blood Clots During Pregnancy
  • Bleeding In Early Pregnancy
  • Signs & symptoms
  • Why Bleeding During Pregnancy Doesn't Always Mean Miscarriage
  • Pregnancy and Blood Clots: What Women Need to Know
  • How to avoid blood clots during pregnancy
  • Blood Clots During Pregnancy

    Blood Clots During Pregnancy Symptoms, Treatment, and Prevention Blood clots are serious concerns and even more so while you are pregnant. Developing a blood clot while pregnant has additional risks or concerns because of your developing baby, thankfully they are rare and there is little need for concern. However, there are steps you can take to further minimize your risk of experiencing them while you are pregnant. What is a Blood Clot? A blood clot occurs when your body sends cells, called platelets, to block the flow of blood.

    Normally, this occurs when you have a cut, to keep the injury from bleeding continuously. During pregnancy, your blood is more likely to clot as a safeguard against losing too much blood during labor.

    However, a condition known as deep-vein thrombosis DVT , which happens when blood clots form in the legs and pelvic region, can occur and is linked with a number of serious health concerns. The good news is there are ways to both prevent DVT and to treat it after it occurs. Also, blood clots affect only 1 or 2 pregnant women out of every 1,, so there is no need for alarm unless you feel you may be at risk.

    What are the Causes of Blood Clots during Pregnancy? Research has shown a number of possible causes of DVT, and it is important to note whether you fall into any of these categories. Women are most likely to experience a blood clot in their first three months of pregnancy or in the first six weeks after giving birth. If you believe you may be at risk for DVT, be sure to talk to your healthcare provider. You could be at risk if: You or a close relative have experienced DVT before You smoke or are exposed to secondhand smoke frequently You are over 35 years old You are overweight You travel long distances while pregnant You are expecting multiples You have a Cesarean section Women tend to be more sensitive and aware of potential complications while they are pregnant.

    Although blood clots are unlikely, there are a few signs that can indicate the possibility of a blood clot. These include: Swelling or pain in one leg Pain that worsens when you walk Veins that look larger than normal What are the Risks during Pregnancy?

    DVT can seriously affect your pregnancy in a number of ways: Blood clots in the placenta Heart attack.

    Bleeding In Early Pregnancy

    An image of a pregnant woman. Credit: Getty Images. Toward the end of your first trimester of pregnancy, you're anxiously looking forward to sharing the happy news with family and friends on social media.

    You're nervous, excited, and still a little bit nauseous, but you're ready to spill the beans on Baby. And then, one morning, you wake up to discover blood in your underwear. Your first thought is simple—and scary—does period-like bleeding during early pregnancy mean you're having a miscarriage? Thankfully, you don't always need to assume the worst. We spoke with experts to learn more. Bleeding or spotting while pregnant doesn't always mean that a miscarriage is imminent.

    In fact, many women experience some form of bleeding , especially in the early weeks, during their pregnancies. According to an article published in the American Academy of Family Physicians, almost 1 in 4 pregnant women will experience bleeding during their first trimesters, but only about half of those cases will result in a miscarriage. Causes of Bleeding During Pregnancy As many women discover after visiting their pregnancy care providers, vaginal bleeding during pregnancy can be normal and not an immediate cause for concern.

    Some types of bleeding can be caused by implantation of the embryo into the uterine wall most commonly on the day your period is due , an infection of some sort in the body, or irritation like from intercourse. Vincent Fishers Hospital Indianapolis, explains that one of the most common causes of bleeding is "lag time" before the placenta is fully formed. Before the placenta starts forming around 12 weeks, the ovary that released the egg provides the main source of hormonal support to the pregnancy, which can cause some time to pass before the placenta is ready to go, and thus, bleeding.

    Slight bleeding, especially if it's tinged with a mucus-like discharge, could also be a sign of early labor. RELATED: How to Recognize Early Labor Symptoms Some bleeding during pregnancy is simply unexplained; One patient I cared for in my work as a labor and delivery nurse experienced moderate bleeding, almost as heavy as her regular period flow, throughout each of her three pregnancies—with no known cause and no need for any further treatment.

    She delivered three full-term and healthy infants. And who among us hasn't heard the stories of women who didn't know they were pregnant because they continued to have monthly bleeding? Bleeding that isn't direct indication of a miscarriage can definitely occur during pregnancy. What You Should Do About Bleeding During Pregnancy Although bleeding may not necessarily mean a miscarriage is inevitable, consistent bleeding at any point during a pregnancy always needs to be evaluated by a health care provider.

    If you're experiencing bleeding, take the following steps: Note when the bleeding started and any activities that may have contributed to the bleeding for instance, did you have intercourse in the last 24 hours or have a vaginal exam performed recently?

    Place a pad or panty-liner never use a tampon! Your health care provider may ask you how quickly you're filling up a typical overnight pad as a way to determine how much bleeding you're experiencing. Also be sure to note the color of the blood—your doctor may need to know if it's bright red or brown.

    While waiting to be seen by your doctor, try to sit down, put your feet up, and drink a large glass of water. Ask yourself if you're experiencing any other symptoms, such as contractions, back pain, nausea, vision changes, or decreased activity of the baby.

    Signs & symptoms

    Why Bleeding During Pregnancy Doesn't Always Mean Miscarriage

    Also, blood clots affect only 1 or 2 pregnant women out of every 1, so there is no need for alarm unless you feel you may be at risk. What are the Causes of Blood Clots during Pregnancy? Research has shown a number of possible causes of DVT, and it is important to note whether you fall into any of these categories. Women are most likely to experience a blood clot in their first three months of pregnancy or in the first six weeks after giving birth. If you believe you may be at risk for DVT, be sure to talk to your healthcare provider.

    You could be at risk if: You or a close relative have experienced DVT before You smoke or are exposed to secondhand smoke frequently You are over 35 years old You are overweight You travel long distances while pregnant You are expecting multiples You have a Cesarean section Women tend to be more sensitive and aware of potential complications while they are pregnant.

    Although blood clots are unlikely, there are a few signs that can indicate the possibility of a blood clot.

    Pregnancy and Blood Clots: What Women Need to Know

    These include: Swelling or pain in one leg Pain that worsens when you walk Veins that look larger than normal What are the Risks during Pregnancy? DVT can seriously affect your pregnancy in a number of ways: Blood clots in the placenta Heart attack. Thankfully, you don't always need to assume the worst. We spoke with experts to learn more. Bleeding or spotting while pregnant doesn't always mean that a miscarriage is imminent.

    In fact, many women experience some form of bleedingespecially in the early weeks, during their pregnancies. According to an article published in the American Academy of Family Physicians, almost 1 in 4 pregnant women will experience bleeding during their first trimesters, but only about half of those cases will result in a miscarriage.

    Causes of Bleeding During Pregnancy As many women discover after visiting their pregnancy care providers, vaginal bleeding during pregnancy can be normal and not an immediate cause for concern. Some types of bleeding can be caused by implantation of the embryo into the uterine wall most commonly on the day your period is duean infection of some sort in the body, or irritation like from intercourse.

    How to avoid blood clots during pregnancy

    Vincent Fishers Hospital Indianapolis, explains that one of the most common causes of bleeding is "lag time" before the placenta is fully formed. Before the placenta starts forming around 12 weeks, the ovary that released the egg provides the main source of hormonal support to the pregnancy, which can cause some time to pass before the placenta is ready to go, and thus, bleeding.

    Slight bleeding, especially if it's tinged with a mucus-like discharge, could also be a sign of early labor. RELATED: How to Recognize Early Labor Symptoms Some bleeding during pregnancy is simply unexplained; One patient I cared for in my work as a labor and delivery nurse experienced moderate bleeding, almost as heavy as her regular period flow, throughout each of her three pregnancies—with no known cause and no need for any further treatment.

    She delivered three full-term and healthy infants. And who among us hasn't heard the stories of women who didn't know they were pregnant because they continued to have monthly bleeding?


    Passing blood clots in early pregnancy