Bastard out of carolina car scene


  • Dorothy Allison’s "Bastard Out of Carolina"
  • Slowlander
  • Bastard Out of Carolina
  • Read A F*cking Book Club #3: We’re Reading Bastard Out Of Carolina!
  • Both scenes involve either African Americans or references to them, and they both contain people gazing at one another in a judgemental manner. The first scene occurs when Bone and Reese visit their Aunt Alma after she leaves Wade and moves into an apartment building.

    There, Bone and her cousins look over the railing downstairs to see faces staring back up at the them. Bone looks at the faces staring out of the windows and thinks about the fact that she has never really interacted with African Americans before, becoming curious.

    Here, the faces staring back at her take on the image of being in a zoo or exhibit, behind glass and not interacdting on any level. The relationship between the children does not exist, even though they start to play with each eventually.

    Bone has a hard time telling if the face that continually stares at her belongs to a boy or girl. After realizing it is a girl, Bone wants to speak to her, but she never does.

    Bone wishes the girl would speak with her, but nothing ever happens. What makes this scene interesting is reading it in comparison with the apartment scene discussed above. Bone and Reese appear to be confned within the zoo while others look and comment on them. One of the kids even stares at Bone like she is an elephant in the zoo.

    Who speaks is not indicated. Just like any nigger trash, getting something like that. Bone and her family could assimilate into society, if they had the money and respect to do so. However, the family that Bone encounters in the apartment does not have the same opportunities. In both cases, the characters begin to play into the stereotypes that others place upon them.

    For example, James and Daryl refer to Bone and her family as trash. What do you think? How does the marginalization of African Americans in the novel affect the reading? People continually refer to her and her family in deragatory terms. Even with these comments, we do not see a large African American presence in the novel. What does this say? Does it say that Bone and her family can overcome? Does the lack of African American characters say the family can overcome because they are white?

    Let me know in the comments below. Allison, Dorothy. Bastard Out of Carolina. New York: Plum Books, Share this:.

    The power of literature over all other forms of art is that it places you directly inside the minds and worlds of other people and you are an active participant. This is why books are still held in the highest regard concerning an education. The book gets off to a great start too. The characters, in their formative infancy on the page, are lively, rowdy, prideful, and interesting.

    Anney especially shined as someone who I was excited to get to know through the course of the book. I continued to feel like I was in good hands when Allison describes the first instance of abuse. And to see Allison completely waste this opportunity to tell a better story, to waste these characters on melodrama, on cliche, on pat standards, well … it makes me mad because it cheapens the horrible abuse Allison experienced herself in real life.

    I only carried on trusting the author to know what she was talking about and that she would have some insight onto the subject matter. To say I felt sort of betrayed when the book was over, especially after reading that disaster of an afterword, would almost be an understatement. Here are the major problems with this book: The wrong character is the narrator.

    Not to say I think kids are dumb, but the things Bone noticed and said seemed to convenient. And of course Allison actually admits to making Bone not real in her terrible afterword. Allison clearly states the Bone is the character she wishes she had been when she herself lived through the abuse she suffered as a child.

    But how can she do any good if she takes her own experiences, throws them all right out the window and creates characters the exact opposite of what she knows anything about? There are deeper problems, however. The emotions are not earned. We have a lot of jigsaw pieces of ragged emotion — Bone is hateful, Bone is angry, Bone loves her momma, then hates her momma. We get told what Bone is feeling but there is nothing connecting what she feels with the outside world.

    Allison did not bridge the divide between what makes Bone feel the things she feels with how she does feel. And what a wasted opportunity too. This book could have been great. I would have written this in the third person and I would have spent a lot more time getting to know Anney because the only way to make the ending work is to know Anney, to know her indecision, her fears, and her strengths. But we only see Anney through Bone.

    Allison cheats us. The book is dishonest, melodramatic, and far from insightful.

    I continued to feel like I was in good hands when Allison describes the first instance of abuse. And to see Allison completely waste this opportunity to tell a better story, to waste these characters on melodrama, on cliche, on pat standards, well … it makes me mad because it cheapens the horrible abuse Allison experienced herself in real life.

    I only carried on trusting the author to know what she was talking about and that she would have some insight onto the subject matter. To say I felt sort of betrayed when the book was over, especially after reading that disaster of an afterword, would almost be an understatement.

    Here are the major problems with this book: The wrong character is the narrator. Not to say I think kids are dumb, but the things Bone noticed and said seemed to convenient. And of course Allison actually admits to making Bone not real in her terrible afterword. Allison clearly states the Bone is the character she wishes she had been when she herself lived through the abuse she suffered as a child.

    But Laneia and Sarah can!

    Dorothy Allison’s "Bastard Out of Carolina"

    Laneia: She moved her brood of kids into an apartment building downtown, a second-floor frame walk-up with a shaky wide porch hanging off one side. No matter where she lived, Alma always had a porch. I read the book in one weekend. I read it on my steps in the pouring rain, chain-smoking and dying for a pimiento cheese sandwich. My accent came back. I started to remember what it had felt like to have to be mean sometimes — not because you were mean, but because the world was.

    I remembered not trusting anyone but your family and that isolation and vulnerability, but also strength.

    Slowlander

    I mean, it was perfect, this book. I guess it can look romantic? Or even stupid? Dorothy Allison takes all of that away — the romance and the ignorance.

    Bastard Out of Carolina

    Ruth Anne Boatwright is the furthest thing from stupid. The perfect balance of Bastard Out of Carolina is ridiculous. Sarah: I firmly believe that every lesbian in the world should read Bastard Out of Carolina. In any case, if you like Autostraddle, I promise that you will love this book. People continually refer to her and her family in deragatory terms. Even with these comments, we do not see a large African American presence in the novel.

    What does this say? Does it say that Bone and her family can overcome? Does the lack of African American characters say the family can overcome because they are white? Let me know in the comments below.

    Read A F*cking Book Club #3: We’re Reading Bastard Out Of Carolina!

    Allison, Dorothy. Bastard Out of Carolina. New York: Plum Books, Share this:.


    Bastard out of carolina car scene