24mm vs 28mm


  • Sigma 14-24mm vs Tamron 17-28mm
  • Nikon AF Nikkor 28mm f/2.8D on Nikon D3X vs Nikon AF-S Nikkor 24mm f/1.4G ED on Nikon D3X
  • Lens Choices: Canon 24mm f/1.4 or f/2.8 vs 28mm
  • Review Canon 24mm vs. 28mm Comparison
  • My Favorite Focal Length
  • 28mm Lenses: The Secret Ingredient For Achieving A Film Look
  • Sigma 14-24mm vs Tamron 17-28mm

    To create a photograph that matches our preferred vision we must choose a tool that is appropriate to the task at hand. Our collection of favorite tools will speak to the type of work we like to create and will further reflect how we see the world. My favorite focal length is 24mm, let me explain why. When I do shoot on smaller, or larger systems I refer to those focal lengths in terms of an equivalent full-frame angle of view. With my Fujifilm mm lens, I have placed a small tape mark at 16mm so I know where the 24mm equivalent angle of view is located.

    In a strict technical sense the normal or standard lens is a At this focal length the perspective of the lens closely match the perspective of our human vision. Note: perspective is different from angle of view, it refers to the relationship between foreground and background subjects. The photographic industry has rounded the It makes sense; a slightly wide lens is very versatile for a wide variety of subject matters.

    The 35mm is possibly the most popular focal length in all of photographic history. The 28mm is also a popular and highly versatile wide angle, without being too wide. Where you start to see a significant difference from the 35mm is when you move down to my favorite focal length, 24mm. The wider angle starts to stretch the environment and foreground material will become larger in relative size.

    Both images taken from exact same point of view and same full-frame camera. For me, 24mm is the sweet spot where the world looks good to me.

    I struggled at my college newspaper to keep up with the more experienced and better equipped students. I held my own for the most part, even getting the coveted front cover, above the fold, on my first day. But getting accolades once is very different to achieving photographic consistency. One day while shooting a fundraiser in the college quad I was struggling to capture both the students and the environment they were in. A fellow newspaper colleague, also at the event, loaned me his 24mm lens for a short period of time.

    After mounting the lens and looking through the viewfinder, it was as if sunbeams broke through the clouds and the choir broke into song. My sudden realization at what I had been missing had me checking my bank account as soon as I got back to my room. My next step was a big mistake. I figured that since 24mm was so awesome, then 20mm would only be better. I found a good deal on a 20mm lens, then started to learn how to use it.

    It was vastly different to my 35mm, and at times it was a lot of fun to use. But the 20mm deficiencies became clear to me in time. It was larger, heavier, and slower than the 24mm; and it was difficult to use with people in the shot. I would eventually sell the 20mm to fund the purchase of my very first beloved 24mm. Bonding with the 24mm For a number of years a friend and I embarked on some far-flung adventures and the 24mm accompanied me every step of the way.

    Our first trip was a bicycle circumnavigation of Iceland, a grueling 2, miles, where gear weight would be a critical factor. My choice of equipment was the Nikon N with a mm and a Nikon F3 with a 24mm. I went straight from 24mm all the way to 70mm, and for the most part, it worked out great. A few steps forward or backward with one or the other and you could get the shot. I had two very different lenses in order to create very different images.

    Iceland bicycle trip from It allowed me to capture at least some of the grandeur of the magnificent places that we went. The small size, light weight and relatively fast aperture on it made it very useful in churches, homes, and markets. The close focusing ability and deep depth-of-field made it great for landscapes. With a 24mm lens in the bag, it seems that I rarely need anything wider. For me, the 24mm is a sweet spot in the world of wide-angle.

    Only in the rarest and most unique of circumstances will it not be enough. It showcases environments without being deceiving. The 24mm can be used with people in the shot, but be a bit careful about having them too close to the edge. It seems to be the perfect choice for environmental portraits where you want to showcase a person as well as the conditions they are in.

    The primes are usually better in terms of sharpness, distortion and light fall-off, but with a tad bit of post-processing the zooms are fine. I have had to make a compromise with my Leica system. The rangefinder window only has frames that go to 28mm so it makes sense to use a 28mm as my wide-angle lens choice here.

    Anyone that knows me knows I can use and enjoy every focal length available. Each lens has a different purpose and tells a different story.

    I encourage you to use all that you can and enjoy the variety. This is natural and even good, as it will help clarify which will become your desert island lens.

    Nikon AF Nikkor 28mm f/2.8D on Nikon D3X vs Nikon AF-S Nikkor 24mm f/1.4G ED on Nikon D3X

    Verdict The Nikon Z 28mm f2. There are two versions: The Z 28mm f2. For this review I tested the SE version as the normal version is not yet available. The Z 28mm f2. Be aware though that the lens probably is sold at a higher price once it becomes available separately as a price of USD at a US retailer indicates. Size diameter x length : 71 x 44mm 2.

    The Z 24mm f1. So the new 28mm Z-Nikkor is indeed the most compact wide-angle full-frame lens with autofocus to use on a Nikon Z camera to date. This makes the Z 28mm f2. But the other two Z-Nikkors are not better at The focus ring has the usual variable gearing to assist in precise manual focusing but cannot be switched to linear response for smooth focus pulling in videos.

    It automatically falls back to its customary focus control when the camera is switched to manual focus. Although the lens control ring has not the same benefit as having a focus ring plus a dedicated aperture ring on the lens it gives you more flexibility to control one of the more important shooting parameters directly from a nice ring on the lens.

    Vignette control offers the usual options of High, Normal, Low and Off. Diffraction compensation can be activated or deactivated but Auto distortion control for the Z 28mm f2. To achieve this Nikon left out the lens hood and pouch and made the compromise of a slow f2.

    Above: Nikon Z 28mm f2. Its size is 70 x 87mm at a weight of g. Closest focus distance is 0. The lens comes with a pouch and reversible lens hood. The Viltrox offers a 1. Focus Focus accuracy and repeatability is critical to consistently produce sharp shots. Repeatability the accuracy of focus on the same subject after repeated focus-acquisition of the Nikon Z 28mm f2. There is almost no focus variation whether the lens focuses from a closer distance or from infinity but I had some cases where the lens refused to focus properly on a slightly misfocused target.

    The lens focuses in around 0. The focus ring is 11mm wide on the SE version of the lens. Its rubber surface is structured like on the older F-mount lenses and can easily be operated with one finger. AF-operation of the lens in photo-mode can be heard as a low buzz from the outside and if you record video with the built-in microphone there is some faint noise.

    This is hardly visible and should not be distracting when shooting videos. Next check out my quality results!

    Lens Choices: Canon 24mm f/1.4 or f/2.8 vs 28mm

    Its size is 70 x 87mm at a weight of g. Closest focus distance is 0. The lens comes with a pouch and reversible lens hood. The Viltrox offers a 1. Focus Focus accuracy and repeatability is critical to consistently produce sharp shots. Repeatability the accuracy of focus on the same subject after repeated focus-acquisition of the Nikon Z 28mm f2.

    There is almost no focus variation whether the lens focuses from a closer distance or from infinity but I had some cases where the lens refused to focus properly on a slightly misfocused target. The lens focuses in around 0.

    Review Canon 24mm vs. 28mm Comparison

    The focus ring is 11mm wide on the SE version of the lens. Its rubber surface is structured like on the older F-mount lenses and can easily be operated with one finger.

    Edge sharpness bottom left corner: Sigma mm Sigma mm Tamron mm The Sigma loses some detail of the further back in the image house some of this can be recovered in post but it is something to consider. However, edge to edge, corner to corner it can render every pixel all the way to the very edge of the frame in focus. The Tamron is almost freakishly sharp in the middle of the frame but the focus starts to fall off pretty quickly. Even pretty far into the image where the concrete round is you can see the leaves are starting to lose sharpness and when you make it to the corner they are soft enough that they cannot be saved.

    Fast focus. Almost no distortion. Heavy: at grams you can feel this all-metal beast in your bag and in the hand. LIGHT, it only weighs grams. This lens with the 2. Cons: Loses sharpness pretty quickly toward the edge of the frame.

    My Favorite Focal Length

    I would eventually sell the 20mm to fund the purchase of my very first beloved 24mm. Bonding with the 24mm For a number of years a friend and I embarked on some far-flung adventures and the 24mm accompanied me every step of the way.

    Our first trip was a bicycle circumnavigation of Iceland, a grueling 2, miles, where gear weight would be a critical factor. My choice of equipment was the Nikon N with a mm and a Nikon F3 with a 24mm.

    I went straight from 24mm all the way to 70mm, and for the most part, it worked out great. A few steps forward or backward with one or the other and you could get the shot. I had two very different lenses in order to create very different images. Iceland bicycle trip from It allowed me to capture at least some of the grandeur of the magnificent places that we went.

    The small size, light weight and relatively fast aperture on it made it very useful in churches, homes, and markets. The close focusing ability and deep depth-of-field made it great for landscapes.

    With a 24mm lens in the bag, it seems that I rarely need anything wider. For me, the 24mm is a sweet spot in the world of wide-angle.

    28mm Lenses: The Secret Ingredient For Achieving A Film Look

    Only in the rarest and most unique of circumstances will it not be enough. It showcases environments without being deceiving. The 24mm can be used with people in the shot, but be a bit careful about having them too close to the edge. It seems to be the perfect choice for environmental portraits where you want to showcase a person as well as the conditions they are in.


    24mm vs 28mm