Air fitting type chart


  • How to Specify Pneumatic Tubing & Fittings
  • Cracking the code on existing pneumatic fittings
  • Air Hose Fittings Types – Guide To Air Compressor Coupler Types
  • Air Hose Buyer’s Guide
  • Jet 420391 5 PC ‘T’ Air Fitting Set – 1/4″ Body x 1/4″ NPT
  • How to Specify Pneumatic Tubing & Fittings

    Learn More Another option is to purchase a coupling set manufacturered by your equipment. Since manufacturers produce coupling sets for their own equipment you won't need to worry too much about the NPT sizes. But be sure to cross-check the product with your own model.

    The components are made of brass and are designed for repetitive use. When to Replace an Air Hose? If you plan on upgrading your system so you can utilize different tools, or if you are looking to get even more out of the system you currently own, then it might be time to replace the air hose on your compressor. And of course, if you find that your current hose has a defect or is worn out, then it's definitely time for a replacement. Hoses naturally wear over time, and they can develop a crack or hole.

    When replacing your air hose, you'll need to determine the following: Length of the Hose - When choosing the length of the hose, consider how you'll be using your air tools and how they need to perform. The longer the air compressor hose, the more air and pressure will be lost along the way. The object is to find the right hose length while finding a balance between maneuverability and achieving minimum pressure loss. Hose Diameter - When choosing hose diameter, you'll find that hose's are measured by their internal diameter I.

    In other words, the larger the I. Common internal diameter sizes include: 6mm; 8mm; and 10mm hoses. One of the main advantages of these sizes is that the air compressor can run at its full capacity.

    Hose Design - Finally, you'll want to be sure that the hose material is durable and flexible enough to do what you need to do. PVC has a tendency to coil, rubber is abrasion resistant, and polyurethane is much less flexible but makes good recoil hoses. Find the Right Equipment Now that you're familiar with the NPT size chart, why it matters, and how it relates to the accessories and fittings, you'll find it much easier to choose the right products for repairs as well as upgrading projects. Take your time selecting a fitting with the right measurments, consult your manufacturer documentation, and always create a good seal using either Teflon tape or a liquid sealant when making permanent connections.

    Attention to detail will mean a more efficient tool that performs just as the manufacturer intended.

    Cracking the code on existing pneumatic fittings

    Polyethylene PTFE Polyurethane tubing is strong and has excellent kink resistance compared to other material types. It has a working pressure of psi or higher and is the most commonly used tubing material. It also has tight OD tolerance, and a wide range of push-to-connect fittings are available. A variety of tubing colors and diameters are offered to help identify pneumatic circuits, and UV stabilization is an option for outdoor use.

    Polyurethane and PVC tubing are the most flexible of the materials above. Polyurethane tubing is very durable with outstanding memory, making it a good choice for coiled, portable or self-storing pneumatic hose applications. PVC is not as tough as polyurethane, but can be specified for food-grade applications, and is a good choice when high flexibility and low cost are required.

    Nylon and polyethylene tubing use harder plastics and are thus less flexible, making them a good choice for air distribution and straight run piping applications. PTFE tubing has several notable properties including high heat resistance, excellent chemical resistance, and good dielectric properties.

    Thread Standards Pipe thread and tubing OD are two completely different things. NPT can be referenced multiple ways. Female thread is labeled in a similar fashion, but with an F instead of an M. NPT fittings require thread sealant when installed, such as Teflon tape, but only if not provided with sealant from the factory. BSPT fittings require thread sealant when installed, such as Teflon tape, but only if not provided with sealant from the factory.

    BSPP, also called G-thread, is less common, and a straight thread, but sometimes needed to connect certain standardized components. Barb fittings are a simple way to connect flexible tubing or hose. The tubing is simply pushed over a barb that is slightly larger than the inside diameter of the tubing.

    A hose clamp is often added to secure the tubing more tightly. While easy to use, barb fittings have a higher risk of leaking or of the tubing popping off. Compression fittings use a small barrel-shaped piece called a ferrule that slips over the outside diameter of the tube and is then compressed between a nut and the other half of the fitting.

    While creating a very secure connection, removing the tubing later can be difficult and often the tubing is deformed to the point that a new tube must be used to reconnect the fitting. With push-to-connect fittings, flexible tubing is easily connected by inserting the tubing end into the fitting.

    To release the tubing, the circular release ring is pressed and the tubing is pulled out. This has become one of the most popular fittings for machinery and automation assemblies.

    These fittings provide an excellent solution for most applications. In harsher environments, more expensive all-metal push-to-connect stainless steel fittings are commonly used, and these fittings are also preferred in high temperature and wash-down applications. Quick-disconnect air couplings are great for changing tool or hose connections and come in several sizes and materials.

    Special Fittings Getting tubing connected between valves and cylinders often requires more than just a simple male connector or elbow. Several special purpose push-to-connect fittings are available to improve integration and operation of pneumatic systems. For example, flow control valves are often used on cylinders to control their speed, and they frequently require these special fittings. Other useful and convenient fittings include mini shutoff valves, mini gauges, check valves and quick exhaust valves.

    These devices should be considered to control machine pneumatic functionality and to monitor air usage. Specifying and installing fittings and tubing sometimes feels like a puzzle, and you will likely find during the assembly process that you missed some fittings. Click here to read more articles related to pneumatic tubing and fittings. Additional Resources.

    Air Hose Fittings Types – Guide To Air Compressor Coupler Types

    But be sure to cross-check the product with your own model. The components are made of brass and are designed for repetitive use. When to Replace an Air Hose? If you plan on upgrading your system so you can utilize different tools, or if you are looking to get even more out of the system you currently own, then it might be time to replace the air hose on your compressor.

    And of course, if you find that your current hose has a defect or is worn out, then it's definitely time for a replacement. Hoses naturally wear over time, and they can develop a crack or hole. Three fittings that look similar but are different.

    Air Hose Buyer’s Guide

    Identifying the type and size of a pneumatic fitting, or the hardware it goes into, can be difficult without the right knowledge and tools. At a glance, many thread and tubing combinations appear similar, especially when comparing metric to other standards sizes used in North America Figure 2. It is important to correctly identify the necessary size not just for fittings, but for solenoids, manifolds, cylinders, valves, air preparation units, and all other pneumatic components.

    At a minimum you should obtain a caliper for making measurements, although sometimes you can get by with a good ruler and close inspection. Here are the basic steps to determine necessary fitting sizes. Step 1: Determine the gender, male or female It sounds simple and intuitive, but this is easy to get wrong when in a hurry, or to write down information incorrectly. If the threads are on the outside of the fitting it is male; if the threads are on the inside of the fitting it is female.

    Figure 3.

    Jet 420391 5 PC ‘T’ Air Fitting Set – 1/4″ Body x 1/4″ NPT

    The differences between tapered or straight thread types is visible in this figure and can be determined with careful inspection and measurement. Step 2: Determine if the threads are straight parallel or tapered Figure 3 This distinction can be a little harder to spot.

    A pitch gauge is the easiest way to determine thread pitch, but calipers or a fine ruler can be used in a pinch. Only a few of these are prevalent and typically used with pneumatic equipment.

    To determine whether threads are tapered or straight, use calipers to measure the outside diameter OD of the threads at the first, fourth, and final thread. For a female fitting, measure the inside diameter ID of the threads at the same intervals.

    With this information, make the following determination: Tapered threads will have a smaller measurement at the first thread than at the final thread. The pitches are close to the same whatsapp dating group links in ghana not compatible.

    Item 2 shows the same connector with a female NPT thread, allowing this connector to be turned onto a male thread. Item 3, still talking about the photo of the connectors above, is the same connector again, but this one comes with a barbed connector, used by inserting the barb into the I.

    A gear clamp is then placed on the outside of the hose which has been pushed up and over the barb, with the barb inserted fully inside the hose. When tightened, the gear clamp will exert force around the entire outside of the hose, compressing the hose wall against the barbs, and making a secure seal.

    All three of the connectors formats above are industry standards. Two have standard NPT threads. Item 3 in the photo has an industry-standard barb. The barbed end is sized by its O. For me, just a few of items 2 and 3 are enough for my air tool kit, as I use the male format item 1 most frequently. The methods of installing a connector into an air tool or onto an airline are common and are shared by many manufacturers of connectors.

    Compressed Air Plug Shape Item 4 in the photo below is an issue to be considered. Compressed Air Connectors The right side shape and size of the connector shown in the photo above could be proprietary. This is the part of the connector that has to match the size and shape of the inside of the mating coupler. If it does not, you may not be able to insert the connector into the coupler at all.

    Or, if you can insert the connector and it is the wrong design, at best the connection will leak, and at worst, the connector could blow off from the coupler, usually at the worst possible time. There are many different styles and sizes of connector configurations available in North America, and around the world, and, as noted, not all are interchangeable. As a result, you have a decision to make when it comes to selecting connectors, and the mating couplers.

    Your compressor may have come bundled with a fitting kit of some sort, similar to the one shown below. You could simply use the kit that came with your compressor, but no others, and be able to use your compressor and air tools but perhaps with a bit of difficulty, as you may not have enough connectors to go around to all the air using devices you may have.

    If it were me getting my new compressor, I would pick up at least a dozen connectors and half a dozen complementary couplers so that I had extras when I needed them. And yes, I expect you will need them. We compressor users like our air tools and as mentioned, it is a whole lot faster to change tools when you have a connector already threaded into the air tool intact port and one or two extra, ready to thread into the next air-using toy you acquire!

    Compressed Air Couplers Compressed air couplers are part of the compressed airline connection tag team, the couplers, and connectors. This typically female fitting type attaches directly to the airline or compressor. The coupler connects to the hose while the plug will attach to the pneumatic tools its powering.

    If you have threaded an airline connector into the supply port of each of your air tools, which is what you want to do to be able to connect a compressed air supply to each quickly and as needed, those connectors allow the quick connection of any air tool or any other air component, for that matter to a mating coupler on an air hose.

    In the photo below all of the couplers are from the same manufacturer though each has a different method of being connected to an air hose or air appliance. Item 4 in the photo above is the critical concern when acquiring couplers.

    When buying couplers you need to make sure that the internal configuration of the new coupler the inside of item 4 shown in the image matches the external shape of the mating connector. In order for the coupler to connect properly to the connector, it must be a compatible design.


    Air fitting type chart