Unitel bolivia


  • Bolivia’s Historic Moment: CPJ Special Report
  • Polls close in Bolivia’s high-stakes presidential election
  • Results are expected to be slower than usual as the Electoral Tribunal suspended the customary rapid count, arguing that it was unable to guarantee the accuracy. Despite a tense and polarised campaign, the election took place peacefully. Some polling stations had to remain open beyond their 5pm GMT closing time because there were queues of people still waiting to vote. At least 36 people were killed in that violence. Council President Salvador Romero promised a safe and transparent official count, which could take five days.

    To win in the first round, a candidate needs more than 50 percent of the vote or 40 percent with a lead of at least 10 percentage points over the second-place candidate. A runoff vote, if necessary, would be held on November Bolivians are also electing a new member Legislative Assembly. The election was postponed twice because of the coronavirus pandemic.

    On a per-capita basis, few countries have been hit harder than Bolivia: Nearly 8, of its Morales, now exiled in Argentina, was barred from running for the presidency or even the Senate by electoral authorities following his removal.

    But support was eroding due to his reluctance to leave power, increasingly authoritarian impulses and a series of corruption scandals. He shrugged aside a public vote that had set term limits and competed in the October presidential vote, which he claimed to have narrowly won outright.

    But a lengthy pause in reporting results fed suspicions of fraud and nationwide protests broke out. When police and military leaders suggested he leave, Morales resigned and fled the country. Her administration, despite lacking a majority in congress, set about trying to prosecute Morales and key aides while undoing his policies, helping prompt more unrest and polarisation. Source: News Agencies.

    Class and ethnic tensions stir antagonism between the Morales administration and the press. As a new constitution is being written, fears emerge that the media could face new restrictions. Morales blasted the reports as part of a campaign to damage the reputation of his government.

    Though top government officials have asserted that they want to promote free expression, Bolivian journalists and free-press advocates are concerned about several constitutional proposals that would restrict the work of the press. The conflict reflects growing ethnic and class tensions in Bolivian society. Economic power is concentrated in the lowland city of Santa Cruz de la Sierra, which is dominated by a European-descended, Spanish-speaking elite.

    With a conservative, pro-business outlook, they control much of the national media. The Bolivian media have made themselves vulnerable to such charges, many journalists acknowledge, by allowing lapses in ethics and standards. Since he took office in January , Morales and his administration have accused private media of being aligned with antigovernment forces.

    In particular, they said, journalists covering street protests and other public gatherings have found themselves vulnerable to harassment and attack by pro-government forces. In January, 11 journalists, photographers, and camera operators were assaulted by pro-Morales demonstrators in the central city of Cochabamba. Thousands of demonstrators—including indigenous groups and members of the ruling leftist party Movimiento al Socialismo MAS —had taken to the streets to seek the ouster of provincial Gov.

    Manfred Reyes Villa after he announced that he would seek a referendum granting greater autonomy to Cochabamba province. Protesters accused the journalists of being biased against Morales.

    In December , for example, unidentified assailants tried to toss homemade bombs into the offices of state-owned Canal 7 in Santa Cruz. As a result, various media outlets limited coverage of coca leaders. I think Morales is still resentful for being discriminated against. About 55 percent of the Bolivian population is indigenous, according to the U.

    State Department. Another 30 percent is mestizo—of mixed indigenous and European ancestry—and 15 percent have white European ancestry. The indigenous population relies predominantly on farming as a means of survival—but it is a bare one, and it contributes only a tiny fraction to the national economic output.

    And for the press, this volatile mix of ethnicity, class, and political power has potentially vast implications. Proposals need two-thirds approval by the assembly for inclusion in the new constitution. Lack of consensus on several key issues, such as indigenous representation in the legislature and indefinite presidential re-election, have slowed the process. The assembly is aiming for completion of the draft in December, although that date could be moved back.

    The new constitution would then go to a referendum for voter approval. La Paz and Santa Cruz de la Sierra have the largest concentrations. Television: About channels across the country. National networks are based primarily in Santa Cruz. Newspapers: About 50 are in circulation. Half are based in the capital, La Paz, and eight are based in Santa Cruz.

    Most have limited circulation. In interviews with CPJ, journalists and advocates said that the Printing Law is a sound piece of legislation but should be updated; the constitution, they said, should be strengthened. For now, though, journalists and press groups are more concerned about losing ground. MAS delegates and other government supporters have rolled out a series of proposals that would restrict the media.

    That suggestion, while warmly received by officials, has yet to be made into a formal proposal. Not so, say top officials. Until recently, the state media had been composed of three main outlets: television station Canal 7, the news agency ABI, and Radio Patria Nueva.

    But the La Paz government—taking a cue from Venezuela, which has begun an ambitious state media-building effort—has also moved to create more state broadcasters. More than two dozen of these stations are already broadcasting to rural and indigenous communities.

    In a country where roughly three-fifths of the population is illiterate, according to the World Bank, radio is a vital medium. Local journalists scoff.

    The Morales administration has said much the same about the handful of privately owned television networks that dominate the market. A May study done by Unir, a democracy-building foundation, found that television networks provided little balance in their coverage. In particular, the study cited Unitel. The network disputed the notion that Unitel is biased against the Morales administration, saying that its journalists are fulfilling their traditional duties as critical watchdogs.

    But without widespread professional support, the council has proved unproductive thus far. But the larger concern for members of the media is the constituent assembly and its plans in regard to press freedom. Share this:.

    Results are expected to be slower than usual as the Electoral Tribunal suspended the customary rapid count, arguing that it was unable to guarantee the accuracy. Despite a tense and polarised campaign, the election took place peacefully. Some polling stations had to remain open beyond their 5pm GMT closing time because there were queues of people still waiting to vote.

    At least 36 people were killed in that violence.

    Bolivia’s Historic Moment: CPJ Special Report

    Council President Salvador Romero promised a safe and transparent official count, which could take five days. To win in the first round, a candidate needs more than 50 percent of the vote or 40 percent with a lead of at least 10 percentage points over the second-place candidate. A runoff vote, if necessary, would be held on November Bolivians are also electing a new member Legislative Assembly. The assembly is aiming for completion of the draft in December, although that date could be moved back.

    The new constitution would then go to a referendum for voter approval. La Paz and Santa Cruz de la Sierra have the largest concentrations.

    Polls close in Bolivia’s high-stakes presidential election

    Television: About channels across the country. National networks are based primarily in Santa Cruz. Newspapers: About 50 are in circulation. Half are based in the capital, La Paz, and eight are based in Santa Cruz.

    Most have limited circulation. In interviews with CPJ, journalists and advocates said that the Printing Law is a sound piece of legislation but should be updated; the constitution, they said, should be strengthened.

    For now, though, journalists and press groups are more concerned about losing ground. MAS delegates and other government supporters have rolled out a series of proposals that would restrict the media. That suggestion, while warmly received by officials, has yet to be made into a formal proposal. Not so, say top officials.

    Until recently, the state media had been composed of three main outlets: television station Canal 7, the news agency ABI, and Radio Patria Nueva. But the La Paz government—taking a cue from Venezuela, which has begun an ambitious state media-building effort—has also moved to create more state broadcasters. More than two dozen of these stations are already broadcasting to rural and indigenous communities.

    In a country where roughly three-fifths of the population is illiterate, according to the World Bank, radio is a vital medium. Local journalists scoff. The Morales administration has said much the same about the handful of privately owned television networks that dominate the market.

    A May study done by Unir, a democracy-building foundation, found that television networks provided little balance in their coverage. In particular, the study cited Unitel. The network disputed the notion that Unitel is biased against the Morales administration, saying that its journalists are fulfilling their traditional duties as critical watchdogs.

    But without widespread professional support, the council has proved unproductive thus far. But the larger concern for members of the media is the constituent assembly and its plans in regard to press freedom.


    Unitel bolivia