National donor deferral registry contact number


  • LGBTQ+ Frequently Asked Questions
  • A “false” positive hepatitis test leaves no answers for local plasma donor
  • COVID-19 and Blood Establishments
  • What is a Plasma Donation Deferral
  • What You Need to Know
  • LGBTQ+ Frequently Asked Questions

    She arrived at Plasma Biological Services to donate — business as usual for the past eight years. However, after she checked in, staff members called her back to tell her she could never donate plasma again. Rosenbaum said staff told her that Hepatitis B showed up in her blood screening. She signed an acknowledgment waiver and made an immediate appointment with her doctor.

    Her doctor told her that her Hepatitis B test came back negative. Rosenbaum said staff members at Plasma Biological Services refused to give her any paperwork stating that her screening tested positive for Hepatitis B. A postive test plus a negative test equals. For Hepatitis C, Mullins said a sample will first be tested for antibodies to the virus. A presence of Hepatitis C antibodies, she explained, means that the body was exposed to the virus in the past. The next step is to test for the presence of the virus by searching for its genetic material in the blood.

    The outcome of the second test determines whether the patient has an active Hepatitis C infection. Sometimes, Mullins said, the first test will be positive and the second test will be negative.

    Things are a little bit different for Hepatitis B, which is what Rosenbaum thought she had. Mullins said there are about five different indicators that would trigger a positive result on an initial test.

    While there is no vaccine for Hepatitis C, vaccines for Hepatitis A and B could potentially trigger a positive result on the antibody test, she said. Rigid regulations Dr. Mark Fowler, medical director for Interstate Blood Bank the parent company of Plasma Biological Services , said that cases like this happen about two or three times a year across 34 collection centers and tens of thousands of specimens. Plasma centers across the nation adhere to strict Food and Drug Administration guidelines when it comes to giving potential donors the greenlight.

    Those guidelines include barring anyone with a history of hepatitis from ever donating again. Testing positive on the initial screening will place a donor on a national list that permanently bars them from donating plasma, even if there is no genetic material of the virus detected. Still no answers Rosenbaum said when she got tested at her doctor, her tests came back negative for both the virus and antibodies. Copyright Nexstar Media Inc.

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    A “false” positive hepatitis test leaves no answers for local plasma donor

    You can be deferred which means you are not eligible to donate at that point in time. This is put in place as a safety measure to make sure that only qualified people are donating to keep the donors and potential patients safe. There are different levels of a deferral that impact if and when you can try again: Permanent deferral Temporary deferral What is a permanent deferral If you are permanently deferred, you will never be allowed to donate plasma at any location.

    This is an industry-wide database where every donor is checked to ensure they are eligible. What is an indefinite deferral If you are given an indefinite deferral, you will not be allowed to donate again until something is cleared up. This can be confused with a permanent deferral, but it is slightly different. With an indefinite deferral, there is the potential for you to donate in the future.

    With a permanent deferral, you will never be allowed to donate. That will need to be cleared up before they can move forward to become a donor. What is a temporary deferral A temporary deferral is where there was something during the process that disqualified you from donating for a specific period of time.

    You are able to donate in the future once that deferral expires and you meet all other eligibility requirements. Typical reasons why you may be temporarily deferred is usually one of your vital checks was out of range. Usually, you can try again after a few days as those deferrals are short term.

    However, some temporary deferrals can last up to 12 months depending on the issue. Why am I deferred from donating plasma Donor and patient safety is a primary concern for plasma companies. There are specific requirements and regulations in place to make sure only eligible people can donate.

    During the process, you will answer a number of questions and go through a number of tests. This is to make sure you are healthy enough to donate and your plasma is suitable for patients.

    There are a number of issues that will probably only come up for that first visit. Refer to this article to help you prepare for your first donation. What are the most common deferral reasons Vitals: One of your vital checks was not in the specified range. The most frequent issues are High blood pressure High pulse or heart rate Fever Low Iron levels Low Protein levels Difficult veins: If your veins are small or not visible, it may be difficult for the phlebotomist to insert the needle into your arm.

    You may be told you need to hydrate or that you are not a good candidate for donation. Medication: Certain types of medication can disqualify you from donating for a period of time depending on your last dose.

    Illness: Specific illnesses or conditions may not allow you to donate. Pregnancy: You cannot donate if you are currently pregnant or delivered within 6 months.

    Your blood establishment will also ask you for data on transfusion and clinical outcome. They will take care of entering them into the registry. The association collects, monitors and shares all information provided by its Blood Establishments members on treatments initiatives and in particular on Convalescent Plasma CCP. Blood Services that wish to participate in the EU donation and outcome monitoring programme should contact EBA by the 20th of April, info at europeanbloodalliance.

    Update 28 March European Blood Establishments have all adapted their process and operations in view of the COVID pandemic to ensure the best security measures for donors, blood products, their personnel and patients. They have implemented physical distance in donation centres, both between donors and donors and staff, several are requesting donors to make an appointment for their donation, to avoid lines in the donation centres, personnel often wear masks and are donors thoroughly questioned about their health and often, travel history to avoid any risk of contamination.

    Donating blood is safe, there is no evidence that the Sars-CoV-2 virus may be transmitted through blood and patients on treatment based on blood and its components must rest assured that there is no disruption in blood provision in Europe and in its quality. Update 20 March EBA strives to map the different actions put in place in European blood establishments facing the COVID19 pandemic, to pursue protecting donors, blood establishments personnel, patients, and to ensure the on-going safety and quality of blood products.

    COVID-19 and Blood Establishments

    European blood establishments have not reported any disruption in the provision of blood products to EBA, despite a decrease in blood collection in most European countries. Less demand in blood products from hospitals as they chose to postpone elective surgery partially explains this. Measures such as offering a larger number of mobile collections to avoid the hospital donation centres, asking donors to wear masks or implementing 3-day shifts for laboratory staff have been implemented by several blood establishments.

    Others activated an emergency plan that do not allow healthcare professionals to take holidays or to leave the country during this pandemic. Deferrals depending on exposure to COVID19, or in relation with travel abroad vary across Europe as well as the questions asked in the donation centre for deferrals.

    What is a Plasma Donation Deferral

    A weekly updated survey allows EBA to collect information from members on organisational and donor selection matters. Several European countries, members of EBA have initiated protocols to start collecting convalescent plasma and EBA is mapping the current initiatives on convalescent plasma for COVID in a view to developing common approaches to donor selection criteria and collection and processing, wherever possible.

    This call is a fast track one for this emergency and the deadline for applications for funding is the end of March. The potential for treatment with convalescent plasma or hyperimmune PDMPs would seem to fall very well into the first category of topics for which applications are invited.

    What You Need to Know

    Preventive vaccines are specifically excluded from the scope of the Call. For full details of the topic, including the budget breakdown and the General Conditions for the Call for proposals, click on the links above which take you directly to the relevant page of the Participant Portal or read the IMI2 — Call 21 Text.

    IMI is facilitating collaboration between the key players involved in health research, including universities, research centres, the pharmaceutical and other industries, small and medium-sized enterprises SMEspatient organisations, and medicines regulators. IMI objectives The goal of IMI, particularly in its second phase IMI2, is to develop next generation vaccines, medicines and treatments, such as new antibiotics. The projects will provide Europeans, including the increasing numbers of older people, with more efficient and effective medicines and treatments.

    Greater coordination across industry sectors will result in more reliable and faster clinical trials, and better regulation.

    You can be deferred which means you are not eligible to donate at that point in time. This is put in place as a safety measure to make sure that only qualified people are donating to keep the donors and potential patients safe. There are different levels of a deferral that impact if and when you can try again: Permanent deferral Temporary deferral What is a permanent deferral If you are permanently deferred, you will never be allowed to donate plasma at any location.

    This is an industry-wide database where every donor is checked to ensure they are eligible. What is an indefinite deferral If you are given an indefinite deferral, you will not be allowed to donate again until something is cleared up. This can be confused with a permanent deferral, but it is slightly different.

    With an indefinite deferral, there is the potential for you to donate in the future. With a permanent deferral, you will never be allowed to donate. That will need to be cleared up before they can move forward to become a donor. What is a temporary deferral A temporary deferral is where there was something during the process that disqualified you from donating for a specific period of time.

    You are able to donate in the future once that deferral expires and you meet all other eligibility requirements. Typical reasons why you may be temporarily deferred is usually one of your vital checks was out of range. Usually, you can try again after a few days as those deferrals are short term.


    National donor deferral registry contact number