How many decks does the enterprise a have


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  • New STAR TREK: LOWER DECKS Images: “First First Contact”
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  • Star Trek: Lower Decks creator reveals the stories he avoids joking about
  • Jeffrey Combs’ return to Star Trek in Lower Decks as an evil computer seems right
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    Taking place only a year after the events of Star Trek: Nemesis, Star Trek: Lower Decks has not shied away from making references to the beloved Next Generation series.

    But the latest episode of the animated series went the extra parsec in creating its own version of a recurring TNG character, with disastrous results. The main plot of "Terminal Provocation," the latest Lower Decks episode , involves a newly introduced character named Fletcher. Voiced by Tim Robinson, the tall and broad-chested ensign seems like the perfect Starfleet officer, a confident yet approachable diplomat.

    But when Fletcher's left on his own to cover for fellow ensigns Boimler and Mariner, his facade cracks. He turns out to be equal parts anxious and inept, continually making things worse and lashing out angrily and desperately. According to series creator Mike McMahan, that's by design. Like Fletcher, he was commonly portrayed with social issues, walking around with tense anxiety and committing many emotional and conversational faux pas. The similarities between the characters stop there, though.

    While Barclay certainly struggled to acclimate to the Enterprise crew, his different way of thinking allowed him to come up with many innovative solutions to save the day. Fletcher, one the other hand, had no flashes of brilliance.

    To McMahan notes, the ensign is not an outlier because of his social behaviors, but rather because he's a "jackass. The two men separately have connected themselves into the ship's computer. For Barclay, the episode "The Nth Degree" made him a super-genius via an alien energy pulse. While the plot allowed us to see a new side of Reg, things turn more dangerous, when he wires himself into the Enterprise, warping the ship into the center of the Milky Way galaxy.

    There, the crew is greeted by a group of aliens called the Cytherians, who imbued Barclay with his intelligence so they could exchange knowledge. Fletcher's experience is different. Frustrated at not being able to do his work, he decides to connect himself to an isolinear core to "become smarter.

    The core takes on Fletcher's lack of brains, becoming similarly aggressive and short-sighted. It gains sentience and tries to grab anything with intelligence to integrate with itself, turning into a behemoth. Mariner and Boimler are able to get it out an airlock--with no help from Fletcher--where it ends up destroying a group of alien scavengers that were attacking the Cerritos.

    It turns out that Mariner purposely played up his role to get him promoted and transferred off the Cerritos to get him out of their hair. And his tenure as lieutenant doesn't last long, as six days later he gets fired for dumping trash in the warp core.

    And let's be honest, though Reg Barclay possesses some out-of-the-box thinking, a transfer off the Enterprise would have probably been the best thing for him too.

    New STAR TREK: LOWER DECKS Images: “First First Contact”

    Captain James T. Because of their bickering, Mariner couldn't even lead the Cerritos out of space dock. Kirk and his loyal crew knew their gambit was a perilous act that warranted a court-martial which came in the next film, Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home. But when Kirk learned that Spock had entrusted his Vulcan soul - his katra - to Dr.

    Leonard McCoy DeForest Kelley , the Captain had no choice but to steal his starship and break multiple regulations to reunite Spock with his katra. Kirk stealing the Enterprise is even more impressive considering his crew only numbered six.

    Scotty had to automate most of the Enterprise's systems so it could operate with a skeleton crew. Further, the threat of the USS Excelsior, which was the fastest and most powerful ship in Starfleet at the time, loomed since it was docked in the same space dock as the Enterprise.

    Scotty also had to sabotage the Excelsior and its transwarp drive so that it couldn't give chase as the Enterprise made its escape. Contrasted to what the Enterprise crew accomplished in Star Trek III, the crew of the Cerritos bungling the Spock rescue mission from the get-go only made Kirk and his friends seem more heroic. Yet mother and daughter allowed their rivalry to completely distract them, which caused the Cerritos to crash into the hangar bay doors.

    Naturally, they failed the simulation and the resurrected Spock would have died again on the exploding Genesis Planet if Mariner and Freeman led his rescue. Butit also shows how dynamic Kirk's rescue operation to save Spock really was since Starfleet now includes their illegal theft of the Starship Enterprise as a holodeck training exercise in the 24th century even though it was illegal.

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    Scotty had to automate most of the Enterprise's systems so it could operate with a skeleton crew. Further, the threat of the USS Excelsior, which was the fastest and most powerful ship in Starfleet at the time, loomed since it was docked in the same space dock as the Enterprise.

    Scotty also had to sabotage the Excelsior and its transwarp drive so that it couldn't give chase as the Enterprise made its escape. Contrasted to what the Enterprise crew accomplished in Star Trek III, the crew of the Cerritos bungling the Spock rescue mission from the get-go only made Kirk and his friends seem more heroic.

    Yet mother and daughter allowed their rivalry to completely distract them, which caused the Cerritos to crash into the hangar bay doors. Naturally, they failed the simulation and the resurrected Spock would have died again on the exploding Genesis Planet if Mariner and Freeman led his rescue.

    Yet, the episode is played off to be nostalgic and not the waking terror that it is. He spends 20 VR years in jail, loses his daughter, gets kidnapped and put on trial by Cardassians. That's better than pretending nothing happened.

    Star Trek: Lower Decks creator reveals the stories he avoids joking about

    But, in the end, let's just hope O'Brien got lots of off-screen treatment for all the messed-up sci-fi shenanigans that broke his brain in two. The average therapist sees patients a week. And how many people are on that ship? To put that in perspective, if Counselor Troi was seeing 45 patients a week and doing monthly check-ins with the entire person crew, it would take roughly 3 weeks to accomplish that.

    If anyone needed to be seen more often or was working through a tough time, that would easily overload her schedule. If Captain Picard is any example, it seems even deeply traumatized people might be avoiding the counseling they need.

    Throughout the series, the only people we see Troi regularly counseling or advising are Lieutenant Barclay, Beverly Crusher, one-off characters of the week, and Worf and Alexander to build their father-son relationship.

    Jeffrey Combs’ return to Star Trek in Lower Decks as an evil computer seems right

    While all those sessions that fans do see are proactive, they pale in comparison to the number of people who should be coming to her office. While that was a positive interaction, she rarely deals with the war trauma that DS9 Starfleet members must face. Trek With Therapy Image Via CBS Therapy and mental health care have shown to be very important parts of maintaining a healthy human being, especially as people become more and more cerebral.

    So, if it helps modern folks, it definitely should be an absolute necessity for the dynamic officers of the future. Maybe Worf and Alexander would have a functioning family relationship. Theoretically, Shaxs might have been able to come back without his entire existence turning into an uncomfortable taboo.


    How many decks does the enterprise a have