6 steps of mentoring process


  • 6 Steps to an Effective, Influential Mentoring Program
  • The 5 most important steps in the mentoring process
  • How to start a mentoring program
  • How to Start A Mentoring Program
  • Mentoring (CSO Version) – Global
  • 11 Steps to Implementing a DSP Peer Mentoring Program
  • 6 Steps to an Effective, Influential Mentoring Program

    Love0 Successful companies are always looking for new, impactful ways to invest in their employees. A mentoring program is a great way to address these needs.

    The benefits of starting a mentoring program Mentoring is a development-focused relationship involving a mentor who passes on relevant skills and experience to a mentee. A mentoring program adds structure to this relationship by making it goal-oriented and time-bound. A program also creates built-in accountability to raise the likelihood of getting measurable outcomes in a short amount of time. Mentoring programs come with many benefits. To help, we outlined six steps that address the most important components of designing, building, and launching a successful mentoring program.

    Determine your goals Even before starting the design process, the first step is to identify the goals for your mentoring program. You can develop goals by asking yourself questions like: What do we want to achieve with this mentoring program?

    What problems are we hoping to address? What does success look like for participants and the company? What metrics do we want to measure or achieve? Being clear about exactly what you want to achieve will help you determine your approach.

    For example: if your goal is to reduce turnover — particularly among junior team members and new managers — you may want to focus on building a mentoring program that increases engagement. You can do this by encouraging frequent touchpoints between the mentors and mentees and making the program more accessible to employees in that demographic.

    When it comes to selecting mentors and mentees, there are a few factors to take into consideration: Seniority This depends on your organization. Diversity Mentoring programs are especially important to women and people in underrepresented groups.

    Make sure these groups have equal opportunities to be part of the mentoring program. When it comes to mentors, you also have to decide whether to use internal or external leaders. There are pros and cons to both sides. While you want to create enough room for flexibility, there are a few areas where you might want to offer guidance, such as: Frequency of meeting between mentors and mentees How to track progress Expectations of both mentors and mentees How to navigate potential challenges e.

    Be thoughtful about the matching process Matching mentors and mentees is always a tricky process. In general, you have three options to choose from: Let employees self-select their mentors Have the program admin make those decisions Use a matching survey that takes an algorithmic approach For cohorts of 30 or more, we recommend the third option. Also, keep in mind that effective matching is about more than just skills, interests, and job descriptions.

    The key is to develop a rounded picture of each mentor and mentee, and make a match based on the goals of the mentee. Launch the program To increase adoption of your program, we recommend building an internal brand that makes participation a special benefit rather than a requirement. For example, consider introducing a process where managers nominate high-performing employees and leaders to be part of the program. This not only publicly acknowledges the value of nominees, but also positions leadership coaching and mentoring as a vital step in their development.

    Measure and scale Make sure you have technologies in place to help your employees track their goals and collect feedback over time. Having the right platform can help visualize progress, demonstrate the ROI of the mentoring program, and provide a big picture of the capabilities of your employees. Also, keep in mind that scaling a mentoring program may be more easily accomplished with a platform like Torch, which offers on-demand mentoring that grows with your organization Mentoring programs are an effective and meaningful way to invest in your employees.

    Use these recommended steps as guidelines to design, implement, and launch one at your own organization.

    The 5 most important steps in the mentoring process

    Twitter You only get out what you put in. The right mentoring process input is integral to the results you take away from a mentoring the output. Mentoring is sneaky in the sense that it seems relatively soft; it appears that people would be able to figure it out on the fly or wing it, and that building an effective mentoring programs is pretty self-explanatory.

    But this is not the case. Good mentoring requires great mentoring process; process which dictates direction, cadence, and guides the mentorship to success. Only interested in your own process? Promoting your mentoring program can take many forms including via your intranet, email, or an event. This part of the process involves creating a survey questionnaire which your potential mentors and mentees will fill out.

    The answers to this questionnaire become their profiles; and their profiles are how you match them. Step 3 — Match The most talked about part of the mentoring process: matching. Matching is quite clearly a critical component in the mentoring process and requires a bit of strategy and a bit of execution. The strategy component involves deciding on the why of your mentoring program — which is derived from the outcomes you want to achieve e.

    Step 4 — Guide Many program coordinators let their mentoring programs down by thinking that matching is the final part of the process. You need to supply them with the resources and content required to make their mentorship work. This can include agreements, checklists, and subject suggestion at the start and during the mentorship.

    Make sure part of your process is equipping mentors and mentees with their process. Step 5 — Measure The final component of the mentoring coordination process is closing the loop on the program and measuring or reporting on success. This involves surveying mentors and mentees, reporting on engagement statistics, and reporting back on initial goals — which dictate whether or not your program — and current process was successful.

    The mentee is the stakeholder who is set to gain most, and hence should be the stakeholder who drives the process forward. Step 1 — Say thanks, agree on expectations, and set up a first meeting The first job as a mentee is to appreciate the fact your mentor is volunteering his or her time, thanking them for it, and respecting their time and your own by setting early expectations.

    This can be done in a simple message or email, or in the first meeting or in-person interaction. Make sure you set a first meeting straight away, so that neither the mentee or mentor is left in the dark or in an awkward spot of having to rekindle a mentorship that never really began.

    Step 2 — Meet in-person or digitally and set goals and direction The first meeting really is the crux of the mentoring process for mentees. Depending on how you are set to be mentored, set a few different types of goals: habit forming goals, reach goals and stretch goals.

    During the mentorship, these goals will guide your discussions and the rest of the process. Step 3 — Track against your goals Between months 1 and 6, the success of the mentorship will be based on the mentee coming back to the mentor with progress updates, successes, and new obstacles. Step 4 — Receive feedback and iterate Listening and receiving feedback is a more proactive part of the process than most people realise.

    This helps create forward momentum, and helps give the mentor the satisfaction of helping and not just wasting their time. Step 5 — Find the right conclusion Most mentorships especially in the workplace, university etc. Part of the mentee process is to ensure you close this mentoring chapter effectively, and open as many new ones as possible.

    This involves maintaining a good relationship and ensuring that your valued mentor becomes a part of your personal advisory board most mentors are happy to be reached out to during decisive moments of careers etc.

    Can your mentor recommended another mentor to connect you to? The mentor process Lastly, we will address the 5 key steps in the mentoring process for mentors. Much has been made of the role the mentor should play in the process. Should he or she be charged with initiating communication at any point during the mentorship? Should the mentor be responsible for any meeting prep?

    The answer to this really does come down to the mentor. My best mentors have chosen to guide the mentee process; by sitting down on day 1 and helping me set goals for the next few months.

    Then they have actively held me accountable and tracked my goals — and setup follow-up meetings. I have a new mentor based out of San Francisco and we were matched relatively informally. He agreed to mentor me; now we connect when I run into an obstacle and he provides me with his insight and experience.

    This mentorship works best when I drive the engagement and bring my problems to him. Factoring these thoughts into the equation, there are some fundamental steps to the mentor process which help both mentors and mentees get more from their time together. Understanding this stems from getting a clear articulation from the mentee as to what their goals and objectives are — and then finding the gaps with which the mentor can help. Step 2 — Help your mentee shape their goals Mentors bring experience to the table; that experience can be in years, or in applicable experience.

    The mentor can look at their own experience in retrospect and understand where they could have been better, smarter, or faster. Step 3 — Keep your mentee accountable Many mentors differ in their opinions of this element of the process: Should a mentor be charged with holding the mentee accountable? The answer in my mind is yes, to an extent. After all, that and context is what separates a mentor from plain information.

    Step 4 — Provide feedback and suggestions for progress At every stage of the mentorship, the mentor should be looking to provide feedback and suggestions. This is the part of the process that makes the mentee take stock and shift their goals and agenda, which is what creates better results than what the mentee could have achieved alone. Step 5 — Conclude Saying goodbye to a mentee can be hard or easy depending on the mentee , but their life changes as does yours.

    Their comes a time in a mentorship when your experience, chat, and advice is mostly exhausted, for now. When this time comes, offer to be there when you are needed; think about if there is another mentor who you could pass your mentee onto for even more progress; and make the mentee feel good about their efforts by saying how much they have grown and changed.

    None of these steps are rocket science; in fact, most of them are pretty simple. Mentoring process is the key to mentoring success — for mentoring program coordinators, for mentors, and for mentees. Share the post "The 5 most important steps in the mentoring process".

    This is also a great time to help them clarify their personal values. Discuss Accountability and Responsibility You definitely want to discuss accountability and responsibility during your mentoring sessions. Make sure there is an understanding that when they make a mistake, they need to take responsibility for it. Think about key scenarios that the employee may face that provides opportunities for learning.

    Examples could be team conflict resolution or working with an upset client. Role-playing exercises help create a higher level of responsibility in your organization, not to mention reinforcing the right way to handle tough situations. Develop a Career Plan Ask your employee: Where do you want to go? Where do you want to be five years from now?

    What are your career goals? The committee may want to require the mentor and mentee to set up a regular meeting time. If you decide that they should meet in one of your offices or facilities, make sure they have privacy so the mentee can speak freely about any concerns. What training are you going to provide to the mentors? In addition to training on the program itself, they may need training on leadership or communication topicslike coaching, constructive criticism, or conflict resolution.

    The committee may decide to mandate some trainings and leave others up to the discretion of the DSP peer mentoring program facilitator. How will you support the mentors? Ongoing support is critical for the success of the program. The facilitator should touch base with the mentor every week to see how the mentor-mentee relationship is developing and to discuss any potential problems. It is also a good idea to have all the mentors get together once a month to talk about how things are going and troubleshoot challenges.

    Who will be eligible to be a mentee?

    How to start a mentoring program

    What will be the size and scope of your program? If you have a large organization, you might want to begin with a pilot program at one location to iron out any kinks before launching the program organization-wide. You also need to decide whether to include all new hires or only selected individuals. In addition, the committee should develop a mentor-mentee agreement.

    How to Start A Mentoring Program

    This conveys the commitment by both parties to participate in the program and outlines their roles and responsibilities. The agreement should also include the frequency and schedule of interactions. Step 5: Develop mentor training Begin your training by clearly outlining the goals for the DSP peer mentoring program and the outcomes you are seeking to achieve.

    Drive home the point that a positive attitude can make or break the program.

    Mentoring (CSO Version) – Global

    Focus your training on leadership, communication, interpersonal, and problem-solving skills. Teaching interpersonal skills will give your mentors the techniques they need to develop relationships. These skills come naturally to some people, but those who struggle may still make great mentors; they may just need a little more coaching.

    Communication skills training can help mentors identify communication blockers and communication enablers. Another great method for training is to simulate mentor-mentee sessions.

    Make sure your mentors can identify when they need to get additional guidance from supervisors or administrators. They need to know when a conversation should remain confidential and when an issue needs to be shared with others in the organization. Step 6: Develop a budget There are four components to the budget of your DSP peer mentoring program: Mentor wages and benefits — Are you going to give mentors an increase in their hourly wages or an annual bonus?

    Certainly, an increase in their hourly wage is the most effective way to drive home the message that your organization values the peer mentorship program and the experience of your mentors.

    11 Steps to Implementing a DSP Peer Mentoring Program

    You also need to consider the amount of time you expect the mentor and mentee to spend together. Finally, account for the wages of the members of your peer mentorship committee and the time they will put into development and oversight of the program. Program facilitation — Will you have a meet-and-greet session for your new mentors and mentees?

    Will you provide food or refreshments during committee meetings? What other supplies will you need? Step 5 — Find the right conclusion Most mentorships especially in the workplace, university etc. Part of the mentee process is to ensure you close this mentoring chapter effectively, and open as many new ones as possible.

    This involves maintaining a good relationship and ensuring that your valued mentor becomes a part of your personal advisory board most mentors are happy to be reached out to during decisive moments of careers etc. Can your mentor recommended another mentor to connect you to? The mentor process Lastly, we will address the 5 key steps in the mentoring process for mentors. Much has been made of the role the mentor should play in the process.

    Should he or she be charged with initiating communication at any point during the mentorship? Should the mentor be responsible for any meeting prep? The answer to this really does come down to the mentor. My best mentors have chosen to guide the mentee process; by sitting down on day 1 and helping me set goals for the next few months. Then they have actively held me accountable and tracked my goals — and setup follow-up meetings.

    I have a new mentor based out of San Francisco and we were matched relatively informally. He agreed to mentor me; now we connect when I run into an obstacle and he provides me with his insight and experience.

    This mentorship works best when I drive the engagement and bring my problems to him. Factoring these thoughts into the equation, there are some fundamental steps to the mentor process which help both mentors and mentees get more from their time together. Understanding this stems from getting a clear articulation from the mentee as to what their goals and objectives are — and then finding the gaps with which the mentor can help. Step 2 — Help your mentee shape their goals Mentors bring experience to the table; that experience can be in years, or in applicable experience.

    The mentor can look at their own experience in retrospect and understand where they could have been better, smarter, or faster. Step 3 — Keep your mentee accountable Many mentors differ in their opinions of this element of the process: Should a mentor be charged with holding the mentee accountable?


    6 steps of mentoring process