Bageshri raga carnatic


  • Indian Ragas: Introduction to Raag Bageshri
  • Bageshri and Pink Floyd
  • Film Songs Based on Classical Ragas (14) – The Melodious Trio: Bageshri, Rageshri and Malgunji
  • Short Takes: Bageshree
  • Parrikar near Badami, Karnataka Namashkar. In this edition of Short Takes, we shine the spotlight on Raga Bageshree and its allies. Almost all versions of Bageshree can be grouped under three main jatis: a Audav-Shadava: R and P are varjit in arohi, P in avarohi prayogas.

    Of these, the first — Audav-Shadava — is sufficient to define the raga-lakshanas. Most of the performed versions, however, adopt the second — Audav-Sampoorna — scheme which involves a peculiar avarohi pancham-laden tonal cluster. Let us now examine the structure through a set of characteristic phrases. In the avarohi mode, a modest pause on g is prescribed it helps prevent a spillover into Kafi.

    Also notice the kan of S imparted to R. Of particular interest are the nyasa bahutva role of D and the D-M sangati. The touch of P occasions moments of delicious frisson. When the audio clips roll out there will be opportunities aplenty to sample a variety of procedures involving pancham. A thoughtless or cavalier approach here can lead to an inadvertant run-in with Abhogi — recall the uccharana bheda that separates Bageshree and Abhogi in this region of the poorvanga — and run afoul of the Bageshree spirit.

    This completes our preamble. A bountiful plate of samplers awaits us. Ramchandra: Radha na bole na bole. Not many today appreciate the extent of sway K. Saigal held over the Indian musical imagination in the first half of the 20th century. Even if all Saigal-sahab did was snore, it would still have musical value. Alu I wonder why he reminds me of a potato and joined with the immaculate voice of Amir Khan: kaise kate rajani. The next item features Shubha Mudgal in a dual role of composer and singer.

    I have composed other verses from the same category in Gaud Malhar, Miyan Malhar etc but I did not feel like singing this one in a Malhar and for some inexplicable reason composed it in Bageshree. Parrikar The terrain of Marathi natyageeta is studded with Bageshree gems. We now slip into our classical robes. The kernel of Bageshree runs through all these recordings. The ancillary details, in particular the treatment accorded pancham, may be of interest to the more discerning reader.

    Moinuddin Dagar. His alap culminates in the Chautala-based prathama nada. The composition, binati suno mori, tuned by Vishnu Digambar Paluskar is standard issue for Gwalior performers. His pupils Vinayakrao Patwardhan and Narayanrao Vyas.

    He picks up a traditional vilambit composition, bahu guna ka mana, and tops it off with a tarana. In his day, Rajab Ali Khan was known as much for his tremendous musical acumen as for his picaresque ways.

    Several musicians of high standing learnt from him, among them his nephew Amanat Khan, Nivruttibuwa Sarnaik, Ganpatrao Dewaskar and others.

    He sings the traditional composition, kaun karata tori binati. This may have some curio or flutter value, but not much else. Shaila Datar : eri piharva ghara aavo. The careful listener will also sense a special sanchari or two: reeta na mori. Ginde A couple of instrumental selections follow. The Chicago-based bansuri artiste Shri Lyon Leifer plays khayal in this commercial release. Narayanaswamy sings a composition of the renowned Carnatic vocal master, M.

    The raga-lakshanas come aglow in this beautiful rendition: sagara shayana vibho. The Bageshree suite concludes with a display of Atrauli-Jaipur power. Kishori Amonkar matches Amir Khan swara-for-swara. The final item is a two-part snapshot of Kesarbai Kerkar in a riveting unpublished mehfil. The presentation is not pure Bageshree for freely interspersed are tidbits of Bahar and Kafi.

    Film Songs Based on Classical Ragas 14 — The Melodious Trio: Bageshri, Rageshri and Malgunji 26th January Greeting the readers on the 71st anniversary of our Republic Day with guest article by Subodh Agrawal Subodh Agrawal last wrote his guest article in the series on film songs based on classical music about a year ago. That was on Bhimpalasi and her sisters Dhani, Multani and Patdeep. He again writes on a set of sister ragas Bageshri, Rageshri and Malgunji.

    Most of us do not know and, therefore, do not care. But we are all familiar with film songs in Bageshri. Subodh acquaints us with songs in Rageshri and Malgunji too, which are our great favourites without knowing their ragas. As usual he also presents some exquisite classical pieces. All in all a great way to celebrate our Republic Day. Looking at how the US democracy crumbled and was about to be overrun at the instance of an unhinged leader on January 6, we realise democracy hangs with a slender thread, and we have to constantly work to preserve it.

    I thank Subodh and greet all the readers on the 71st anniversary of our Republic. I had finalized the list of songs to be included more than a year back. But as it happens, of the seven deadly sins, I happen to be guilty of sloth more than any other.

    What shook me out of sloth was chancing upon a beautiful composition in Bageshri accompanied by a wonderful dance performance. So, let me share that first: There is detailed information about the artists in the YouTube description. Bageshri was one of the first ragas I learnt to recognize and appreciate, thanks to my friend Pankaj Sharan. It took me quite some time to learn to distinguish it from Rageshri. The similarity between the two ragas is a little hard to understand because there are several important differences between the two: Rageshri completely omits the fifth note Pancham and it uses shudh gandhar instead of the komal gandhar of Bageshri.

    I became aware of Malgunji much later. Bageshri can also be confused at times with Bhimpalasi. This information is freely available on the net for those who are interested. The best reference, as always, is www. All three ragas are very sweet and pleasant — ideal for shringar rasa.

    Malgunji is perhaps the sweetest, while Rageshri has a touch of gravity. So, let us begin with the songs in Bageshri. Naushad uses it to express regret and sadness and Saigal gives life to it in his inimitable style: 2. Shringar is very much there, but with more than a touch of pathos. I am intrigued by the choice of Hemant Kumar as a singer for this classically complex song, but I am glad CR went for him. It is hard to imagine the song having the same impact in the voice of Manna Dey or Mohammad Rafi — the two most gifted male singers for classical songs: 3.

    The mood is teasing, romantic and delightful — the key mood of Bageshri: 4. I forget the classification AK had done of nayikas in his article. Eventually the population stabilizes with a large majority of dads and a fair sprinkling of cads.

    If film songs are to be believed, women seem to have a special fondness for cads even when they know they would be left holding the baby — literally. It is an interesting topic to explore. Meanwhile let us enjoy this song from an aptly titled film: 6.

    Like number 5 this one also demonstrates the effectiveness of a false beard as a disguise: I now come to Rageshri. I have a problem here. I had no difficulty placing the raga for the Bageshri songs, but except for the Mughal-e Azam song I did not easily recognise the raga in the Rageshri list. This was puzzling because I have no difficulty in recognising Rageshri in proper classical pieces.

    Trying out the sargam of the songs on my flute, despite my limited ability, helped decipher the mystery — the songs at number 9, 10 and 11 have many departures from the standard movement of Rageshri. This one uses pa and komal ga quite freely — two notes not permitted in Rageshri.

    Good to see Rajshri. We talk of brain drain, but what about beauty drain from India! I now come to Malgunji. Pardon me if I have included a song not quite in this raga. All the songs, however, have a beauty that is both sensuous and serene. Then I heard it in a radio program that used to do what I try to do through this series of articles — introduce listeners to classical ragas through film songs — and I became aware of Malgunji.

    The remainder of the list followed: This song marked the arrival of young RD Burman a. Pancham: Before I present the classical pieces, I would share this folk song by Surinder Kaur. Bageshri is not a raga associated with folk music, but this song combines the earthiness of folk with the sophistication of classical.

    Our heroine is calling to her beloved to cross over the pattan ford of Jhanaan Chenab. The obvious reference is to the legend of Sohni Mahiwal. An instrumental version of the sthayee of this song used to be the signature tune of one of the programs on All India Radio — I forget which one.

    A friend of mine who comes from a long lineage of classical and devotional singers was not convinced about this song being in Bageshri. The composer is credited as K Pannalal:.

    All three ragas are very sweet and pleasant — ideal for shringar rasa. Malgunji is perhaps the sweetest, while Rageshri has a touch of gravity.

    So, let us begin with the songs in Bageshri. Naushad uses it to express regret and sadness and Saigal gives life to it in his inimitable style: 2. Shringar is very much there, but with more than a touch of pathos. I am intrigued by the choice of Hemant Kumar as a singer for this classically complex song, but I am glad CR went for him.

    It is hard to imagine the song having the same impact in the voice of Manna Dey or Mohammad Rafi — the two most gifted male singers for classical songs: 3.

    The mood is teasing, romantic and delightful — the key mood of Bageshri: 4. I forget the classification AK had done of nayikas in his article.

    Indian Ragas: Introduction to Raag Bageshri

    Eventually the population stabilizes with a large majority of dads and a fair sprinkling of cads. If film songs are to be believed, women seem to have a special fondness for cads even when they know they would be left holding the baby — literally. It is an interesting topic to explore. Meanwhile let us enjoy this song from an aptly titled film: 6.

    Bageshri and Pink Floyd

    Like number 5 this one also demonstrates the effectiveness of a false beard as a disguise: I now come to Rageshri. I have a problem here. I had no difficulty placing the raga for the Bageshri songs, but except for the Mughal-e Azam song I did not easily recognise the raga in the Rageshri list. This was puzzling because I have no difficulty in recognising Rageshri in proper classical pieces.

    Trying out the sargam of the songs on my flute, despite my limited ability, helped decipher the mystery — the songs at number 9, 10 and 11 have many departures from the standard movement of Rageshri.

    This one uses pa and komal ga quite freely — two notes not permitted in Rageshri. Good to see Rajshri. We talk of brain drain, but what about beauty drain from India! I now come to Malgunji.

    Film Songs Based on Classical Ragas (14) – The Melodious Trio: Bageshri, Rageshri and Malgunji

    Pardon me if I have included a song not quite in this raga. All the songs, however, have a beauty that is both sensuous and serene. Then I heard it in a radio program that used to do what I try to do through this series of articles — introduce listeners to classical ragas through film songs — and I became aware of Malgunji.

    The remainder of the list followed: This song marked the arrival of young RD Burman a. Pancham: He can take a very uncommon raga and make a composition out of it which will be brilliantly melodious, with not even the slightest hint of a classical relic underneath. This is what puzzled me. It is a dreamy, psychedelic and ecstatic composition which showcases a lot of signature Pink Floyd sounds and Gilmour bends.

    Short Takes: Bageshree

    I gave it a listen again, just to see if the claims had any strong roots or were it just another display of half-baked musical knowledge. Most of the rock bands in the so-called golden age of rock music mainly based their music on the most popular scale in the world. The minor pentatonic. You can hear this scale in many songs, around the world. Also, this is a very guitar friendly scale. Minor pentatonic is the first scale I learned in guitar. All the microtonal bends, fast runs, and rockified blues licks made the scale a necessary and sufficient ingredient for a guitar solo.

    But there were some bands who explored other scales as well, on a regular basis. Pink Floyd is also known for its usage of the Dorian Mode in songs. This is the important part. Bear with me, if you feel the jargons are suffocating you, please look them up on Google. The Dorian mode is only different from its more popular cousin, Aeolian mode, or the natural minor scale by one note. Instead of the b6 in Aeolian, we have the natural 6 in Dorian.

    But this small change can bring about a drastic impact on the mood created by the scale. Now, the i-IV chord change is all you need to get that Dorian feel.


    Bageshri raga carnatic