Tarry poop


  • Gastrointestinal Bleeding
  • Black or tarry stools
  • Colon Cancer Symptoms
  • Why is My Child’s Poop Black (or Red, Green, Yellow…)?
  • Blood in Stool: What it Means for Your Dog
  • Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    Hi everyone, Nurse Kim here. Everybody poops. Some poop looks abnormal, but can be totally fine. Have you ever seen a poop that looks wormy? Think banana bread. Now stop endlessly googling worm poop! So when should we worry about poop? In kids, we really care most about white poop, red poop or black poop.

    Black Stools in Children Now black poop has to be black. Dark poop means that there can be bleeding in your digestive tract. The darker it is, the higher up the in the GI tract the bleeding was likely to occur. If you ate blueberries as a snack or black beans for dinner, then take a deep breath and look again the next time they poop. You can put the sample in a small tupperware or keep it in the diaper—most providers just need a small smear to check for blood.

    If specific tests are needed, you may be sent home with specific instructions and containers. Dairy food can cause constipation , especially if you eat or drink excessive amounts. Lots of hard, large poops that are tough to push out can cause kids to get little tears around their bum. These are called anal fissures and are common in constipated preschool and toddler aged children. When a child has an anal fissure we can sometimes see little streaks of blood in their poop.

    Blood in the poop can be very scary. Take a deep breath and take a look around. If you see a little crack on their bum hole and you know their poops have been hard, this is likely the source of blood. Changing their diet by introducing more fruits and fiber, while giving them less dairy, can help immensely to soften up poops. A little Aquaphor or Vaseline applied topically can help soften up the skin, too.

    If you see a lot of blood like blood filling the toilet bowl or diaper, or dripping blood , or your child also develops a fever or vomiting , you should be seen by your medical provider right away. Did you drop a glob of raspberry jelly on the diaper? Then relax! Poop that looks like jelly can indicate that your baby has intussusception , which is basically one part of your intestine telescoping into another and causing a blockage. The pain usually comes and goes. If this is what you are seeing, then get that cranky kid looked at.

    Your sweet smelling little human is spitting up and now smells like Swiss cheese? You can always put that babe down in her crib while you take a few deep cleansing breaths or a quick break, even if she is crying. Remember, never shake a baby. Call a friend! Friends love holding babies! Ok, back to poop!!! Your newborn baby has red specks in her poop.

    Your baby might have a milk protein allergy or sensitivity to whatever they are drinking. Formula or breastmilk should be the only drinks you give your newborn. Fed is best. Bring a poop sample, or simply wait five minutes—you know that newborn is about to poop again! The liver makes a dark-colored digestive aid called bile, which helps give poop its brownish color. Problems with the liver, small intestine and gallbladder can cause the poop to look white and needs to be addressed by a medical provider right away.

    Is the poop really white? Or just light brown or yellow? Could it be the new antibiotic she is on or the antacid he just started? If it really looks white think white crayon , call your provider and be sure to save that poop. Ask a nurse first— just snap a pic and show us! You can instantly chat with a nurse from your smartphone or computer. Seriously, our average response time is under 8 seconds. You know your child best. You are the parent after all.

    You are doing a great job. One day you will miss talking about their poop! Other than information received directly by you from your personal provider, the health center blog should not be considered medical advice. Read more. Recent Posts Drive patient outcomes with the Nurse EMR The first patient-centered, nurse powered EMR for telemedicine Digital health programs require a patient experience that proactively engages patients and helps them navigate through the healthcare process.

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    Men and women have some of the same preventative health needs but also some distinct tests and screenings. Some providers suggest that if you are under the age of 49 […] General health screenings all women should know about As a young female or one that might be in the midst of childbearing, doctors visits are plenty. But what happens in our middle age years? There are important health screenings that every woman should be getting.

    Men and women […] Middle-aged checkups and preventative health As you age, it may seem like you can skip regular checkups and just visit the doctor when you have concerns or are sick. However, it is important to have regular visits with a primary care provider or general physician for preventative health reasons.

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    Stools - floating Stools — bloody; Melena; Stools — black or tarry; Upper gastrointestinal bleeding Black or tarry stools with a foul smell are a sign of a problem in the upper digestive tract. The term melena is used to describe this finding. Considerations Eating black licorice, blueberries, blood sausage, or taking iron pills, activated charcoal, or bismuth medicines like Pepto-Bismol, can also cause black stools.

    Beets and foods with red coloring can sometimes make stools appear reddish. In all these cases, your doctor can test the stool with a chemical to rule out the presence of blood. Bleeding in the esophagus or stomach such as with peptic ulcer disease can also cause you to vomit blood.

    Causes The color of the blood in the stools can indicate the source of bleeding. Black or tarry stools may be due to bleeding in the upper part of the GI gastrointestinal tract, such as the esophagus, stomach, or the first part of the small intestine. In this case, blood is darker because it gets digested on its way through the GI tract. Red or fresh blood in the stools rectal bleeding , is a sign of bleeding from the lower GI tract rectum and anus.

    Peptic ulcers are the most common cause of acute upper GI bleeding. Black and tarry stools may also occur due to: Abnormal blood vessels A tear in the esophagus from violent vomiting Mallory-Weiss tear Blood supply being cut off to part of the intestines Inflammation of the stomach lining gastritis Trauma or foreign body Widened, overgrown veins called varices in the esophagus and stomach, commonly caused by liver cirrhosis Cancer of the esophagus, stomach, or duodenum or ampulla When to Contact a Medical Professional Call your health care provider right away if: You notice blood or changes in the color of your stool You vomit blood You feel dizziness or lightheadedness In children, a small amount of blood in the stool is most often not serious.

    The most common cause is constipation. What to Expect at Your Office Visit Your provider will take a medical history and perform a physical exam.

    The exam will focus on your abdomen. You may be asked the following questions: Are you taking blood thinners, such as aspirin, warfarin or clopidogrel, or similar medicines? Have you had any trauma or swallowed a foreign object accidentally?

    Have you eaten black licorice, lead, Pepto-Bismol, or blueberries? Have you had more than one episode of blood in your stool? Is every stool this way? Have you lost any weight recently? Is there blood on the toilet paper only? What color is the stool?

    When did the problem develop? What other symptoms are present abdominal pain , vomiting blood, bloating , excessive gas , diarrhea , or fever? You may need to have one or more tests to look for the cause:.

    A black, tarry stool melena often indicates an upper GI source of bleeding although it could originate from the small intestine or right colon.

    Black or tarry stools

    Other causes of a black stool might include iron or ingestion of bismuth Pepto-Bismol. Hematochezia, or bright red blood can be mixed in with the stool or after the bowel movement and usually signifies a bleeding source close to the rectal opening.

    This is frequently due to hemorrhoids; however, you should never assume rectal bleeding is due to hemorrhoids. Conditions like rectal cancer, polypsulcerations, proctitis or infections can also cause this type of bright red blood. How is it diagnosed? If it is suspected that the bleeding is in the upper gastrointestinal tract, then an upper GI endoscopy is usually the first step.

    This is a flexible video endoscope that is passed through the mouth and into the stomach while the patient is sedated. It allows the doctor to examine the esophagus, stomach and duodenum for any potential bleeding sites. If a site is detected, therapeutic measures can be used to control the bleeding. For example, a bleeding ulcer may be controlled with use of cautery, laser photo therapy, injection therapy or tamponade.

    If the bleeding is suspected to be in the lower GI tract or colon, then a colonoscopy is usually performed. In a colonoscopy, a video colonoscope is passed through the rectum and across the entire colon, while the patient is sedated. Other diagnostic methods for detecting a bleeding source might include a nuclear bleeding scan, angiography, or barium GI studies. In the case of chronic low-grade or occult bleeding which may result in anemia, the work-up to discover the source of the bleeding is usually done on an outpatient basis.

    Once the cause for the blood loss is determined, appropriate treatment and management recommendations can be made. How is GI bleeding treated? If GI bleeding is very active or severe in nature, it may require hospitalization. Shock can occur when blood loss approaches approximately 40 percent of blood volume. If there is evidence of hypotension low blood pressure or a fast heart rate, dizziness, or light-headedness, then treatment would include IV fluids and monitoring of the blood count, with blood transfusions given, if necessary.

    While in the hospital, the patient will continue to be monitored closely and certain medications will be employed in an attempt to stop the bleeding. In addition, diagnostic tests are performed.

    In some cases, GI bleeding will stop spontaneously. If the bleeding persists, despite all of the above-mentioned therapeutic techniques, then surgery might be required as a last resort. Call a friend! Friends love holding babies! Ok, back to poop!!! Your newborn baby has red specks in her poop. Your baby might have a milk protein allergy or sensitivity to whatever they are drinking.

    Formula or breastmilk should be the only drinks you give your newborn. Fed is best. Bring a poop sample, or simply wait five minutes—you know that newborn is about to poop again!

    The liver makes a dark-colored digestive aid called bile, which helps give poop its brownish color. Problems with the liver, small intestine and gallbladder can cause the poop to look white and needs to be addressed by a medical provider right away. Is the poop really white? Or just light brown or yellow? Could it be the new antibiotic she is on or the antacid he just started?

    Colon Cancer Symptoms

    If it really looks white think white crayoncall your provider and be sure to save that poop. Ask a nurse first— just snap a pic and show us! You can instantly chat with a nurse from your smartphone or computer. Seriously, our average response time is under 8 seconds. You know your child best. You are the parent after all. You are doing a great job. One day you will miss talking about their poop!

    Other than information received directly by you from your personal provider, the health center blog should not be considered medical advice. Read more. Recent Posts Drive patient outcomes with the Nurse EMR The first patient-centered, nurse powered EMR for telemedicine Digital health programs require a patient experience that proactively engages patients and helps them navigate through the healthcare process.

    Why is My Child’s Poop Black (or Red, Green, Yellow…)?

    This is why Nurse is launching a new kind of EMR. One that is powered by our network of over 2, nationwide nurses and advanced […] Preventing and treating earwax blockage For many, remote working has brought on new issues. For one, many have noticed that wearing earbuds all day has highlighted the amount of earwax they have. Have you noticed your earwax more than usual?

    What is earwax anyway? Knowing what to expect and when will help keep you on track to know when you need to make that next in-person appointment.

    Blood in Stool: What it Means for Your Dog

    Men and women have some of the same preventative health needs but also some distinct tests and screenings. Some providers suggest that if you are under the age of 49 […] General health screenings all women should know about As a young female or one that might be in the midst of childbearing, doctors visits are plenty. But what happens in our middle age years? There are important health screenings that every woman should be getting.


    Tarry poop