Jtl violin labels


  • Jérôme Thibouville-Lamy – JTL
  • Thibouville Lamy Violin 1890
  • J.R. Judd Violins
  • JTL French 1931 Violin – H. Emile Blondelet (Label)
  • In Praise of the Humble Medio Fino
  • Jérôme Thibouville-Lamy – JTL

    The JTL company seems to still exist in the present day. They may be a shell of their former selves but they do have a website. Anyways, onto the violin! Catalogs from other years list a Compagnon but without the III appended to it. We can guess that this violin is somewhere around years old, give or take a few years. Compagnon translates to companion, partner, colleague, sidekick, etc depending on the context of the sentence.

    So this violin is meant to be your friend in your journey of playing music. I bought this violin from a Canadian eBay seller. The package arrived in less than a week via Air Mail service.

    There was no indication of rough handling or damage to the box. I was impressed with the sheer number of stamps on the front. I opened the box and a gaggle of newspaper, packing peanuts, and bubble wrap greeted me.

    Shipping a violin without a case makes me a bit shifty but I have to remember that for as fragile as violins are they are also extremely tough instruments. My biggest fear is that the package handlers will crush this package under a large load.

    The idea of insurance sounds good until you think about the time and money you will spend sending everything back, filing claims, waiting, etc. You might as well take on some risk and just get the package delivered as quickly as possible. Sometimes expedited shipping is better because there could be less days of handling and less chances of damage.

    I removed the packing material and unwrapped the bubble wrap. It was like stripping a mummy. Underneath all that was my violin. It was relieving to see it whole. Nothing rattled, shook, or made a funny noise when I picked it up.

    So far, so good! Time for an examination. I sort of knew it ahead of time when I placed my bid. All of us have some missing teeth in our gears that causes thing to slip. The first thing I noticed is the filth. It must be a mixture of dirt, rosin, and dust. Did the violin sit out in the open gathering this yuck or was it from years of being played and never cleaned?

    Whatever the case, I want to clean it off but I know I have to be careful not to remove the finish with the soot. There are plenty of threads on various violin forums about this.

    People have used alcohol, spit, water, polish, dish soap, etc. I will probably start with a gentle polisher and rosin cleaner first.

    The strings here are old and need to be replaced. Does anyone have any suggestions on replacements? The body has some damage to it.

    First, it has a small chip in it. Thankfully nothing extra is coming off. The body has some splits and cracks to it in various places.

    One of the less noticeable places is on the ribs. The back has two major splits forming. The first one is in between the two halves of the back and it is only by the neck. The neck, scroll, and fingerboard are just fine. The tailpiece has a missing chip that you can see in one of the pictures above. I wish the tailpiece had some fine tuners on it but I can get the instrument in tune just fine without them too.

    The action on the high E string is a bit high but that can fixed easily enough. Last, I would like to highlight the label inside the violin. I know that many people say the label inside is not important. What really matters is the tone, form, and fit of the instrument. Would you buy a Ford Mustang without its signature galloping horse on the grille? Some would and some would not.

    I guess you know which camp I am in! The Compagnon III label is in decent shape with what looks like some sort of glue dropping down its height. For something that was printed close to years ago, I am happy to see it surviving as well as it is. I would be curious to know what kind of printing process was used to create this label. What kind of paper is this too? The JTL logo, at least this instance, is of a lyre with a violin in front of it.

    Rays emanate from the assembly. I like the fact that the length of the rays alternate between short and long almost all the way around the entire assembly. Did special models for export have their labels in English? So how did I do with this violin against my requirements? They look like they can be easily repaired but not by me. Where the Stainer rings, this one sings.

    It sounds like an odd way to think of tone but it works. If the Stainer is a crisp sweet apple then the Compagnon is a smooth nectarine or maybe a peach. Play lots and play loud!

    Thibouville Lamy Violin 1890

    Although found in catalogs from Laberte and Couesnon as Demi-Fin, in reality, the affixed labels were the same as the Thibouville Company. The Medio-Fino instruments produced in the 19th century by Thibouville, with lemon yellow or burgundy varnish, have an exceptional sound. They have sometimes been revarnished, purfled, and have had Italian labels placed in them by unscrupulous dealers.

    Increasingly rare are those that have retained their little labels of origin. These products are sometimes very basic and contrary to the honor of Mirecourt violin making. Please do not put all Medio-Finos in the same bag, otherwise we would be deprived of excellent violins! The inside of the top with a respectable bassbar, not carved from the back. Very cleanly graduated and finished. In this photo we can see a decent corner with the etched purfling.

    The back is a single piece of relatively plain poplar. However, some figure can be seen in the lower right bout. I have heard many stories that these backs were not carved, but somehow thinned and pressed to final arching. No idea. And here is a somewhat primitive, but not horrible scroll. As quoted from www. Some are very primitive and poorly made, while older examples are actually very nice and finished cleanly with full blocking and correctly installed linings.

    However, even these show evidence of fast production, such as interior tooth-plane marks on the ribs and rasp imprints on the table platforms, which is part of their charm. It is also true that the best examples have a wonderful sound. I know many folks in the business who have a fondness for Medio-Finos and its easy to see why.

    A nice example should be pretty inexpensive and a great alternative to new Chinese violins. Share this:.

    Like many other luthiers and archetiers of the time, each had spent time training at the famous Parisian workshop of Jean-Baptiste Vuilaume. Charles and Charles-Claude merged their businesses in The merger was also attractive for the luthiers as it would provide opportunities for their business to extend outside of the borders of France.

    The Husson-Buthod-Thibouville company thus came to be in Marguerite Hyacinthe Lamy was a cousin of Buthod and Husson.

    J.R. Judd Violins

    We can guess that this violin is somewhere around years old, give or take a few years. Compagnon translates to companion, partner, colleague, sidekick, etc depending on the context of the sentence. So this violin is meant to be your friend in your journey of playing music. I bought this violin from a Canadian eBay seller. The package arrived in less than a week via Air Mail service.

    There was no indication of rough handling or damage to the box.

    JTL French 1931 Violin – H. Emile Blondelet (Label)

    I was impressed with the sheer number of stamps on the front. I opened the box and a gaggle of newspaper, packing peanuts, and bubble wrap greeted me. Shipping a violin without a case makes me a bit shifty but I have to remember that for as fragile as violins are they are also extremely tough instruments. My biggest fear is that the package handlers will crush this package under a large load.

    The idea of insurance sounds good until you think about the time and money you will spend sending everything back, filing claims, waiting, etc. You might as well take on some risk and just get the package delivered as quickly as possible. Sometimes expedited shipping is better because there could be less days of handling and less chances of damage. I removed the packing material and unwrapped the bubble wrap.

    It was like stripping a mummy. Underneath all that was my violin.

    In Praise of the Humble Medio Fino

    It was relieving to see it whole. Nothing rattled, shook, or made a funny noise when I picked it up. So far, so good! Time for an examination. I sort of knew it ahead of time when I placed my bid. All of us have some missing teeth in our gears that causes thing to slip. The Medio-Fino instruments produced in the 19th century by Thibouville, with lemon yellow or burgundy varnish, have an exceptional sound. They have sometimes been revarnished, purfled, and have had Italian labels placed in them by unscrupulous dealers.

    Increasingly rare are those that have retained their little labels of qgd. These products are sometimes very basic and contrary to the honor of Mirecourt violin making.

    Please do not put all Medio-Finos in the same bag, otherwise we would be deprived of excellent violins! The inside of the top with a respectable bassbar, not carved from the back.

    Very cleanly graduated and finished.


    Jtl violin labels