Browning bar upgrades


  • Browning Upgrades the BAR Line
  • M848/848S Browning BAR, Silver
  • Aluminum black Scope Mount for Browning BAR accessories. Hunting Scopes, Optics & Lasers
  • The Best Roasting Pan
  • Gun Review: The Browning BAR Mark II Safari in .300 Win Mag
  • Browning BAR LongTrac Review
  • Browning Upgrades the BAR Line

    Over the course of my long culinary career, I prepared and roasted countless turkeys for magazine Thanksgiving spreads, hotel buffets, and family holidays. A good roaster is very handy year-round for more than just meat. You can roast hearty vegetables like winter squash, parsnips, and onions, then toss with cooked pasta for an easy Meatless Monday meal. Got a bumper crop of homegrown tomatoes? A large roasting pan is an ideal receptacle to slow-roast a big batch of tomato confit for winter soups and pasta sauces.

    And when a custard or cheesecake recipe calls for baking in a water bath, a roasting pan with high sides and sturdy handles makes the process easier. A good, fully clad tri-ply roaster that can perform well over direct heat and in the oven is surprisingly affordable and useful year-round.

    But if you cook a lot of roasts, or are inclined to make one-pan dinners during the week, we suggest spending extra money for better searing and roasting performance. How we picked Comparing one-pan chicken dinners in the Anolon, Cuisinart, and KitchenAid roasting pans. For this update, we tested three new pans against our top pick and runner-up.

    The best roasting pans are great for stovetop and oven cooking, versatile for year-round use, and sturdy enough to hold the bulkiest roasts. To meet those requirements, we focused on a few factors: Material The material of the roasting pan was our primary concern. Tri-ply is simply aluminum sandwiched between stainless steel.

    Layering an aluminum core with stainless offers the best of both worlds. A tri-ply roasting pan is effective on the stovetop for gravy-making and searing because the aluminum core ensures that heat is evenly dispersed, preventing buckling or warping. We immediately dismissed roasting pans with dark interiors, like anodized aluminum and nonstick. Heat circulation Proper heat circulation in the pan ensures your roast is evenly browned and cooked throughout. We think 3-inch walls are an ideal height.

    A pan with uneven heat distribution, like one made from thin sheet metal or with an encapsulated bottom, will warp and develop burned spots over direct heat. A fully clad pan with some weight to it is sturdier and more consistent on the stovetop. Roasting pans with a flat bottom are best for easy searing and for whisking roux and gravy. Some pans have a trough around the inside perimeter that makes it difficult to mix a smooth gravy or get even oil coverage when searing because liquids run to the sides of the pan.

    This leaves the middle of the pan dry and susceptible to scorching. The Cuisinart fits over two burners, and the flat bottom makes stovetop tasks simple.

    Nick Anderer, the executive chef at Maialino in New York City, thinks a roasting pan should fit a full eight-rib standing beef roast, which can run up to 16 inches long. Roasters that measure at least 16 by 12 inches are in the sweet spot. Shape You want a roasting pan that can consistently sear, deglaze, and cook gravy on the stovetop. Rectangular roasting pans are more versatile than oval roasters. Both of the chefs that we spoke with said that though oval pans are attractive, the rectangular shape is more practical because it gives you more cooking area.

    Handles Handle comfort and strength are important because you need a good grip when pulling a hot, heavy pan filled with boiling juices out of the oven. Rigid, upright stainless steel handles that are riveted into the sides are best, and they should be big enough to allow a good grip with bulky oven mitts on.

    Thin folding handles that are welded into the sides are difficult to grab and feel flimsy—not an ideal situation when carrying a bubbling pan of fat. V racks vs. The most common is a V-shaped rack that elevates the roast 1 to 2 inches off the bottom of the pan. Some roasters have a flat rack, our upgrade pick included. Flat racks offer more surface area to accommodate larger roasts. A flat rack, on the other hand, spans the bottom of the roaster, giving you more room for vegetables and aromatics.

    Food stylist Judy Haubert prefers to place her turkey atop carrots, celery, and onions so that they caramelize and add complexity to the gravy.

    We prefer stainless steel racks without nonstick coating. How we tested The All-Clad Flared Roaster has a versatile flat rack that can fit large roasts or smaller cuts. We tested each pan on a home range, using the same oven temperature and same burner settings on a gas stove. We looked for even browning, radiant heat circulation, and consistent fond color across the bottom of the pan. We then transferred the pans to the stovetop to make gravy, making sure to straddle each pan across two burners.

    Were there weird indentations in the bottom of the pan that made scraping fond or whisking gravy difficult? To test the versatility of a roasting pan, we made a one-pan meal in each, searing chicken pieces and then finishing in the oven with vegetables. With this test, we could see how well each pan distributed heat on the stovetop and in the oven. We looked at the color of the chicken skin after searing and the color of the vegetables after roasting.

    M848/848S Browning BAR, Silver

    Pulled your bolt action rifle from your shoulder, racked the action so hard the empty case was sent into the next county, pulled up on your game, and saw it bouncing off into the distance?

    A semi-automatic greatly reduces the time needed to take a follow up shot and helps with follow up shots on mis-hits or missed entirely. Previously limited to and derivatives, the new-ish LongTrac model and other new models offer more power chambered in long action cartridges like , , 7mm rem mag, and win mag. The rifle is also available in multiple trims: the Stalker version with synthetic stock and blackened parts, camo dipped, desert tan, traditional safari, as well as the oil finished wood model with satin nickle receiver as shown here.

    The Benelli R1 is a lot more angular and. The rifle does come with a bolt release lever, which is somewhat inconveniently located beyond the reach of your right hand, but is perfectly serviceable to use to lock the bolt back.

    Browning should upgrade the BAR to use the much better X-bolt magazine system. Secondly, the cross bolt safety on the trigger is just so-so. The sling stud on the forend juts out the front, ruling out bipods. There are many more moving parts and more variables that can change between shots. The Benelli R1 is supposed to be more accurate, but your mileage may vary depending on your rifle.

    The Browning is not very easy to clean compared with most military semi-auto rifles. Many hunting semi-automatics get an undeserved reputation for poor reliability because some hunters never clean or oil their rifles. The does not come with magnum cartridge options, though it does come in a carbine barrel length Weight is comparable between the two rifles, though the BAR ShortTrac loses some weight where the stays mostly the same when it goes from long to short action. Most users report better accuracy from the R1 and the magazine is a standard detachable.

    It also has a nice soft buttpad and optional 10 round magazine. This semi-automatic Browning BAR is a favorite hunting rifle Tags topheader By Adriel Adriel has been hunting all his life, enjoys shooting 3 gun, is a trainer for Project Mapleseed and tries to apply a practical point of views to his reviews. Find the Hunting Gear guy on YouTube.

    Aluminum black Scope Mount for Browning BAR accessories. Hunting Scopes, Optics & Lasers

    Roasting pans with a flat bottom are best for easy searing and for whisking roux and gravy. Some pans have a trough around the inside perimeter that makes it difficult to mix a smooth gravy or get even oil coverage when searing because liquids run to the sides of the pan. This leaves the middle of the pan dry and susceptible to scorching. The Cuisinart fits over two burners, and the flat bottom makes stovetop tasks simple. Nick Anderer, the executive chef at Maialino in New York City, thinks a roasting pan should fit a full eight-rib standing beef roast, which can run up to 16 inches long.

    Roasters that measure at least 16 by 12 inches are in the sweet spot. Shape You want a roasting pan that can consistently sear, deglaze, and cook gravy on the stovetop. Rectangular roasting pans are more versatile than oval roasters.

    Both of the chefs that we spoke with said that though oval pans are attractive, the rectangular shape is more practical because it gives you more cooking area. Handles Handle comfort and strength are important because you need a good grip when pulling a hot, heavy pan filled with boiling juices out of the oven.

    The Best Roasting Pan

    Rigid, upright stainless steel handles that are riveted into the sides are best, and they should be big enough to allow a good grip with bulky oven mitts on. Thin folding handles that are welded into the sides are difficult to grab and feel flimsy—not an ideal situation when carrying a bubbling pan of fat. V racks vs. The most common is a V-shaped rack that elevates the roast 1 to 2 inches off the bottom of the pan.

    Some roasters have a flat rack, our upgrade pick included. Flat racks offer more surface area to accommodate larger roasts. A flat rack, on the other hand, spans the bottom of the roaster, giving you more room for vegetables and aromatics.

    Food stylist Judy Haubert prefers to place her turkey atop carrots, celery, and onions so that they caramelize and add complexity to the gravy. We prefer stainless steel racks without nonstick coating. How we tested The All-Clad Flared Roaster has a versatile flat rack that can fit large roasts or smaller cuts. We tested each pan on a home range, using the same oven temperature and same burner settings on a gas stove. We looked for even browning, radiant heat circulation, and consistent fond color across the bottom of the pan.

    Gun Review: The Browning BAR Mark II Safari in .300 Win Mag

    We then transferred the pans to the stovetop to make gravy, making sure to straddle each pan across two burners. Grunts would frequently strip down their BARs by removing the bipod and buttstock monopod in an effort at saving weight. He also drew up plans for something radically fresh and new. He called this invention the Browning Machine Rifle. The Browning Machine Rifle was based upon a thoroughly discredited concept.

    In this hypothetical world, soldiers armed with repeating weapons would stand erect and stride purposefully toward enemy positions firing a round from the hip every time a certain foot hit the ground. Naturally, this idea arose with the French. It turned out that in the real world actual flesh and blood soldiers were none too keen to put this dubious tactic into practice. It did nonetheless still birth a most remarkable firearm. While large and heavy, the BAR was a fearsome weapon in the hands of American troops.

    At Cycling at around rpm on full auto and firing from the open bolt, the BAR offered a quantum improvement over the bolt-action rifles of the day as well as such abominable light machinegun designs like the French Chauchat. The fully automatic BAR fires from the open bolt position. Subsequent WWII-vintage web gear just had six double-magazine pouches and eschewed the cup. The BAR, shown here in Korea, proved itself to be a capable warrior. Of those, 17, were issued to the American Expeditionary Forces, and 4, actually saw action.

    These were the variants that were later stolen by Clyde Barrow from National Guard armories and used on his reign of terror across the American heartland during the gangster era.

    Browning BAR LongTrac Review

    A great many earlier guns were arsenal rebuilt into the more modern configuration. A2 upgrades included a bulky folding bipod, a redesigned flash hider, reimagined furniture and fresh entrails. The new three-position selector offered safe, slow and fast options. The cyclic rate on slow was around rpm, while the fast rate was about rpm.

    These early composite buttstocks were molded from a fabric-reinforced plastic that rendered fine service. Most wartime BARs sported this sort of furniture.

    The MA2 ultimately weighed 20 lbs. As a result, a great many BAR men in WWII removed their bipods, monopods and sometimes flash suppressors in an effort at cutting down weight.


    Browning bar upgrades