Somali gay sheeko


  • A very queer Somali life
  • Gay Somali refugees face death threats
  • Oodweynenews.com
  • Newmodel Porn Hub Live Sex Cam
  • Pangea World Theater finds its stage on Lake Street
  • First Gay Somali Website Launched
  • A very queer Somali life

    Naftada been ha usheegen!! Maxa yeelay waxay runtu ku sahlaysa xalinta dhibatoyiin-kaaga gar ahaaneed iyo kuwa aad bulshada la wadaagto. Qirashada dhib jirta waa xal-ka badhkiis, lakiin haddi anaad qirsanaynba in ay dhib jirto, xalna ka hadalkii waa mid aan jiriinba.

    Dhalinyar badan oo khanisiin ah oo inaga mid ah waxay naftooda kula nool yihiin been, taas oo aad ugu adkaysay noolasha. Dhawaan waxan booqday Magalada Oslo ee caasimada dal-ka Norway, halkaas oo u degan yahay wiil aan hadeer hasaawe noo socdo. Wiilkaas waxay asxaab yihiin wiil Falastiini ah oo khaniis ah, waligii wiil mooye, gabadh ma arkin, xata xubinta dumar-ka looga tago meel ay ku taal iyo sida ay u eeg tahay film mooye ma arag.

    Noolashiisa intu oga oodhan khaniis ayuu ahaa. Hadeer waa 30 jir. Waxan aad uga naxay oo runtii aad ii damaqday wiilkaasi wuxu amiinsan yahay in Khaniis la noqda in ay tahay nacdal iyo xumaan, sidaas oo ay tahay habeen iyo maalin-ba gus iyo futo ayuu ka hadlaya. Waxa u ii waydiiyay ka waran haddii walaal-ka ama walaasha ay ku sheegan in ay khaniis yihiin waxad dareemi lahayd, waxan ku dhahay waan ku farxi laha, maxa yeelay, sida ay sariirtooda u seexdan aniga waxba ma yeelayso kalgacayl-ka walaal-tinimo ee aan u hayo.

    Waxan hadal-kiisa ka akhristay laba ariimood. Beentu kaliya maaha tan mararka qaar qofku naftiisa kula nool yahay oo iyadu aad u daran, hase yeshe waxa jirta mid qofku bulshada kula dhaqmo taas oo marka ta hore loo eego samaynteedu ka weyn tahay.

    Maxa yeelay tan aad naftaada kula nooshahay adiga uun bay wax ku yeesha lakiin tan aad bulshada kula nooshahay, waxay wax yeelaysa adiga iyo bulshada kugu ag xeeranba. Wiil Soomaliyeed ayaan mar is jeclaanay, been ayuu igu bartay, beentaasi aad ayay u dhawacday xidhiidhkayagii, taas oo markii danbe sabaabtay in u burburo. Waxan amiinsanahay been yar oo daqiiqad sheegta in ay aad u waxyeelayn karto amiinada iyo kalsooni-da aad qofka kale ka haysatay. Waxan aniguna ka baqay in aan u sheego qayb kale oo noolol maalmeed-kayga ka mid ahayd, si anaan mar kale kalsooni-diisa u waayin.

    Waxay iga qadatay hal sanno in aan noolol maalmeed-kayga ku badalo si aan u rumeeyo waxan u sheegay oo anaan mar kale kalsooni-diisa u waayin. Marka waxan uga jeeda ma qiyaasi kartid inta aad qof benu adam ah isla gaadhaysan barasho maalin-ta aad kulmaysan, Marka uma baahnid in aad been u sheegto. Hadaanad rabin in aad wax walba u sheegto, waxad odhan karta ma rabo in hada ku sheego.

    Waxan dareema mararka qaar khaniisiinta Soomaali-da in hadal badnidoodu la marto in ay been sheeko kaga dhigan si ay been iskaga ka gadan. Mararka qaar waxad arkaysa qof ku sheegaya waxanad waydiinin oo been ku salaysan.

    Miyayna ka ficnayn in u kala hadlo wax run ah isagana aan ka waramayn inta u been kugu daldali laha.

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    I celebrate on the 20th. My father was a driver for the US embassy. When the war came , that made our migration from East Africa simpler than others. We spent a couple months in Kenya—not ten years like many people. I was three years old when we left.

    We ended up in Kansas City, Missouri. I went to preschool there. In , my two older brothers heard about job opportunities in Minnesota. One brother got into immigration trouble. He was arrested and deported. He lives in Mogadishu. The rest of us took a bus to San Diego. We were in California from My dad worked as a security guard.

    We had Somali and Latinx neighbors. I attended a very diverse elementary school. Every couple days the entire student body would go outside and sing Lean on Me. It sounds corny, but I think it helped us kids build with each other in the long run. Eventually my parents decided to move us to Minnesota. We had a section 8 housing voucher. The agency placed us in Mankato. That was a huge cultural shock. We were one of the first few Black immigrant families in Mankato.

    The first week our house got TPed. My brother caught the kids who did it and made them take it down. Other than a few of these instances, however, Mankato was good to us. The White folks that cared, were welcoming and intrigued. They had a lot of questions. We lived next to a cemetery, up the street from a KFC, which I loved. I hung out at the library a lot, opened my first email account there. I was in ELL classes. Other immigrant classmates were fun and very kind.

    We navigated rural White Minnesota together. My dad worked at a factory in Mankato. One of my brothers also got a job there. We had a car — an old Mitsubishi. I got jealous about other kids having birthday parties.

    I asked my parents to throw me a party and they did. I got my first bike as a gift. I tried to convince them to let me play a band instrument. I think that is a misinterpretation. My family comes from a Sufi tradition, in which chants and drums are part of the spiritual practice. You may ask yourself how immigrants, refugees, low income people of color, and poor White people, came to live in Eden Prairie, one of the richest cities in America.

    Some housing and public policy leaders thought it was a good idea to move poor folks from the urban areas into rich suburbs because, in their eyes, our proximity to rich White people would increase our chances of upward mobility. We were the desegregators, living on West Wind Drive, in Prairie Meadows apartments, in a development filled with Somali, Asian and Russian immigrants. I enjoyed being around more Somalis and other people of color. It was a perfect community for me.

    The city today is struggling with how to understand and support the growing Somali and African American populations, especially in the school system. In a few schools the majority of students are on free and reduced lunch. That, to me, is segregation. Recently, there was an effort to desegregate the schools. White parents created a coalition and hired lawyers to fight it.

    The Superintendent was fired, given a nice severance package. I had challenges at Eden Prairie High school. I was discriminated against by staff and security. I left school for a month, got into an alternative school, and then took it upon myself to petition Edina Public Schools to let me in.

    People who are 1. I experienced that. As an immigrant child you have to know these systems school, health care, housing, college process , and navigate them yourself.

    You help your parents navigate all of this, often times translating for them. You grow up fast in some ways. Edina let me in. My Dad would drop me off at school in the morning. I would ride my bike during warmer months. My senior year, my mom decided we should move to Edina. My last six months of high school I was in-district. It was different in Edina. All these white saviors. It was great for me. They would give me gift cards on holidays because in their eyes I was the poorest person they knew.

    If I wanted to do a summer program or enroll in a Community College program, they would pay for it. That attitude changed with open enrollment policy.

    Minneapolis students began to come. When there were just a few of us, white people embraced us. Overall, it was a wonderful experience. At the same time it was mind-fuck in terms of discrimination and systemic racism. I did a lot of organizing around those racist crime alerts. I served on Somali Student Association board. We supported each other. We also had huge political differences. We challenged each other. I enjoyed the debates. Sometimes they were really heated. I remember there was a conversation about doing a Somali cultural event that would include a dantu dance.

    Some argued that men and women should not dance together. I said I would leave the association if that was imposed. A woman stood up and pointed at me and told my I was going to hell.

    I saw her recently at the Somali Independence event and reminded her. We laughed about it. Some in the Somali Student Association were anti-gay. My process of coming out is ongoing. People want to know. I was not ready. I was deeply depressed. I hung out and partied, but not much. I focused on school and organizing, and trying to figure out who I was. I became more and more supportive of LGBT rights — which was a way of acknowledging myself. I became really good friends with a queer Black hip hop artist from Chicago named Verse.

    I think I came out to her, in a kind of subtle way.

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    I was raised in the U. After that experience, I started to focus on my own work as a Congressional Staffer. I discovered I enjoyed and was good at working on public policy. I focused on East African community issues, immigration, foreign affairs, public safety, arts, civil rights, civil liberties, and juridical matters. I worked with my colleague Carol Wayman, on the right of immigrants to send remittances to their families in fragile nations like Somalia.

    I worked on an event where Somali actor, Brakad Abdijoined us to talk about the need for the US Federal Government to not make it hard for Somalis to send remittances. It created paranoia. I was on a conference call with the White House as we tried to understand and push back against this program. In Minnesota, U. I was that staffer raising the red flag about this program.

    In Minneapolis, the family members of those who were being killed, requested meetings with me and asked Rep. Ellison to pressure the United States Government to pressure Ethiopia to stop the killing of protestors and activists. I did some research and found out about a group called the Oakland Institute who were working with the Anuak community in Ethiopia because their land was being unlawfully taken and sold to multinational corporations.

    They also campaigned to release Anuak leader, Okello Ochalla. He had gotten asylum in a Scandinavian country, had gone to a meeting, and was extradited and imprisoned by the Ethiopian government.

    I joined their campaign to petition the Obama administration for his release and to uplift Ethiopian particular Oromo human rights issues. In Minneapolis, I was meeting with Ethiopian constituents whose family members were being killed in Ethiopia.

    It was brilliant working with the experts themselves— those impacted — on a bill stripping non-humanitarian aid from Ethiopia, and a Congressional resolution advocating for human rights in Ethiopia.

    The resolution was passed last year by Congress. I believe it was the largest gathering of Ethiopians advocating for human rights in Ethiopia at the U. I coached the Oromo community on how to engage members of Congress. The exposure empowered the Ethiopians. They told their stories in a packed room and then of them marched to the White House, shutting down the street.

    Of course that was a red flag for Capital police. It was beautiful to see people chanting in their languages for their rights. In the end the Capital police sent them a thank you note, saying how well the demonstration was carried out. Last year Ochella was released and I cried tears of joyI am so happy for him and his family. He had returned to spend the rest of his life in his homeland. That experience was a major shift in my life.

    When I got back, Minneapolis was in deep turmoil. I worked on judicial matters for the office, though not as much as I wanted to. It was really hard to watch how our leaders in Minneapolis and Minnesota responded to the Jamar Clark murder and the youth occupying the Minneapolis Police 5th precinct. That summer people were getting killed, literally a few blocks from our office in North Minneapolis.

    I remember this grandmother driving and being hit with a bullet not far from our office. I wanted to do more on local police issues than I was allowed to do within the confines of a Congressional office, but we did more than other offices did. The experience of being with my father in Somalia and his passing really moved me.

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    I felt like there was no reason for me to walk around the world without sharing my truth. I was deeply in love with someone and I could not share it. That was when I decided to come out. It is also when I left congressional work. My family did not understand why I would leave without having a job lined up.

    But I knew it was the right time to transition into a different phase in my life. I went to a week-long meditation retreat. Becoming a Progressive Policy Consultant. I have moved on from the Minnesota DFL. I have no faith in their politics. I watch young people jumping into the work. I give them a heads up, let them know what to expect, give them advice on how to protect their hearts. I realized that, while I was done with electoral politics, I saw value in working with people affected by policy to navigate changes.

    I had the connections and knowledge to help folks push progressive policy. With a friend, I opened a lobbying business called Khyre Solutions. Hanging out with elders, learning how they weave the social fabric of the community, was cool.

    Empowering Somali Women and Children I got a lobbying contract to work with Minnesota Minority Childcare Alliance, empowering Somali women and children on health, equity and consent. I also worked with Isuroon. They hired me to navigate how to deal with a female genital cutting bill before the Minnesota Senate. While I was there, someone in Minnesota took their child to Illinois and had the procedure done.

    A doctor did it. The school found out. The person was Indian, not Somali, but in Minnesota when people think of Muslims, they think Somalis. They wanted to add a rider to the law that already outlawed FGC. It was one of those messaging bills that add nothing and go nowhere but serve as racist propaganda.

    We had a delicate dance, fighting against this bill. My boss was passionate about the issue, but this was a hate bill that demonized Somalis. Provide money for reconstructive surgery for those impacted. This bill just demonizes people. The committee hearing on the bill was intense. Ultimately, they decided not to bring it up in the full Senate for a vote.

    We started connecting with national groups. BAJI is 13 years old. They engage, on a national level, in economic justice, labor rights, immigration and foreign policy. Locally, a group of us formed the Black Immigrant Collective. The other organizers are Liberian and East African Women. I am the only male.

    The organization is led by women. White progressives showed up strong. We had a harder time getting Black immigrants involved. Some people had their own Somali gathering at Brian Coyle Icerbox downloader. In an effort to get Black immigrants involved, we met at Intermedia Arts and had a planning session.

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    Our first meeting was big. A smaller group has continued. Liberians have been working on this for two decades. Originally they were on TPS. Bush ended the program and created DED — the same benefits, only less rights. Now there was no automatic extension. He made the change by executive order. It was a political move. Every year there has to be a campaign to get another year. This work is hard on your capacity and your heart. The goals are not immediate. Black immigration work is on the ten-year plan, but the policies directly impact people today.

    And we have changed the talking points of the Democratic caucus this political season. We are going through a strategic planning process. We are discussing how to balance local and national work.

    I think we need both. We can more easily affect change at the local level, taking on the local enforcement of the Muslim ban and labor rights—issues that impact Black migrants.

    These issues are easier to influence than federal immigration policy.

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    UndocuBlack helped us work on DED. We have been running from one issue to another without a dollar, doing this work for two years. Just now we are starting to think about funding. Now we have some help nationally. Of course there is some drama over turf, but we are getting work done.

    There is tension over creating a restorative justice process while people are being deported and raided. It is emotionalizing exhausting. That is why I went to South Africa. I burned some political bridges advocating, I did some stupid stuff, like cussing out politicians on line, which is career-suicide for someone like myself. I was in this hotel room in DC breaking down crying, reading stories of people who will become undocumented if their status expires.

    I was so pissed at Minnesota Representatives. I had to backtrack and apologize. But it did get us to the table with our elected officials. Our second DED fight was a bit easier, given our experience. But instead of praise, it earned him many enemies. But UNHCR officials at the Dadaab camp denied the number of people faced by such threats was either alarming or significant.

    A field officer working on a relocation programme that seeks to move at least one million Somalis said, likewise on condition of anonymity, that alleged threats presented by some of the refugees were merely a ploy used by refugees to seek resettlement in Europe or the US.

    Noolashiisa intu oga oodhan khaniis ayuu ahaa. Hadeer waa 30 jir. Waxan aad uga naxay oo runtii aad ii damaqday wiilkaasi wuxu amiinsan yahay in Khaniis la noqda in ay tahay nacdal iyo xumaan, sidaas oo ay tahay habeen iyo maalin-ba gus iyo futo ayuu ka hadlaya.

    Waxa u ii waydiiyay ka waran haddii walaal-ka ama walaasha ay ku sheegan in ay khaniis yihiin waxad dareemi lahayd, waxan ku dhahay waan ku farxi laha, maxa yeelay, sida ay sariirtooda u seexdan aniga waxba ma yeelayso kalgacayl-ka walaal-tinimo ee aan u hayo. Waxan hadal-kiisa ka akhristay laba ariimood.

    Beentu kaliya maaha tan mararka qaar qofku naftiisa kula nool yahay oo iyadu aad u daran, hase yeshe waxa jirta mid qofku bulshada kula dhaqmo taas oo marka ta hore loo eego samaynteedu ka weyn tahay.

    Maxa yeelay tan aad naftaada kula nooshahay adiga uun bay wax ku yeesha lakiin tan aad bulshada kula nooshahay, waxay wax yeelaysa adiga iyo bulshada kugu ag xeeranba.


    Somali gay sheeko