Nepali puti chekai 15 uears


  • In Nepal, Sex Trade Thrives in Transport Hubs
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  • The project mission is to help Nepali girls from Sindhupalchok District become educated, empowered, and equal through a process that emphasizes team building, sisterhood, inclusion, and consensus. Life Challenges of the Women Served Women and girls in Nepal face many challenges: limited access to education, health care services, and other resources; child marriage; violence; sexual abuse. Nepali society is incredibly diverse culturally, socially, religiously, and linguistically.

    How women and girls are viewed varies across ethnic groups. Different ethnic groups and castes have cultural practices and traditions concerning issues that directly affect girls and women, like marriage, childbirth, and menstruation. For example: Hindu communities often practice chhaupadi — where a menstruating girl or woman is isolated in a separate room or out-hut for a period of days.

    For girls, this may constitute a health risk if hygiene and sanitation cannot be maintained. It may also mean missing school every month, affecting their attendance and performance. Women and girls in Nepal face many forms of inequality, but among the most significant challenges are child marriage and human trafficking. Child marriage has serious social and health consequences, and on a national level contributes to limited access to resources and power, which is confirmed by low number of female politicians and leaders.

    Nepal is 8th on the list of countries in which child marriage is most prevalent. The victims end up as bonded domestic workers or sex workers in Nepal and India. The traffickers, who are often known to the girls and their families, promise them good jobs in the city, or marriage opportunity. An estimated 10, to 12, girls and women are trafficked from Nepal every year.

    Some of the trafficked girls become domestic servants in Nepal or India, often unpaid — domestic work also means higher vulnerability to violence and sexual abuse. Girls have the lowest social status. Not only are they female, but they are also children — both factors placing them low on a social ladder. Traditionally, they are not encouraged to speak up, to work in teams to address their issues, or to participate in decisions. Their opinions are not valued. There are not many female leaders who could serve as role models for Nepali girls and illustrate to them who they can be when they grow up.

    The Project Dining for Women will fund twenty groups of twenty girls to complete the four-week workshops of the Girls Education and Empowerment Project. Week Two: Safety — Girls learn how to deal with bullying, domestic violence, sexual abuse, early marriage, and human trafficking.

    Week Three: Leadership — The girls talk about empowerment and their strengths, plan their futures, and participate in a series of confidence building and team building activities. They also meet a female leader from their village or from Kathmandu and have a chance to discuss with her the advantages and challenges of leadership.

    Week Four: Community Project — Through consensus the girls decide upon and implement a community project that demonstrates their leadership and ability to transform their communities and schools.

    Whether decisions are taken individually, by small working groups or by the class as a whole, the emphasis is on the girls voicing their opinions and deciding what should be done.

    When working as a group, participants have to agree on certain decisions while trainers help facilitate group discussions and make sure everyone is heard. The program is designed to be comprehensive, locally sensitive and culturally appropriate for girls.

    The curriculum, however, is not fixed. The trainer answers the anonymous questions during following session. Consequently, the participating girls have direct influence on the curriculum. The member girls and a female teacher are elected by the rest of the group. The Committee is provided with a resource sheet where contact information to various local organizations is listed.

    The creation of the Girl Support Committee is an exercise in democracy. All the details, such as the name of the Committee, the members, and their positions are decided by voting and the process is facilitated by one of the trainers.

    Thanks to the voting process, the elected Committee members reflect the trust and sympathies of the whole group.

    Community Engagement — Over the course of four weeks, girls host community ceremonies where they invite school staff, their families, and local leaders. Female teachers are selected by students to observe the workshops and promote institutional sensitivity and support for girl-specific issues in the school. During the workshops, various cultural beliefs and practices and how they change over time is discussed. Questions for Discussion Popular culture in the US and Europe promotes certain body image, and reinforces certain social norms, values and relations in reference to girls.

    What are they? Did you have a role model when you were growing up? What was their influence on you? What are the most serious challenges that girls face in your community? How do they differ from community to community? What are the prevention and response mechanisms? Each year, workshops for girls will be conducted by five local female trainers each conducting 4 workshops over the course of four months.

    Over two years, girls and 25 teachers will participate in Her Turn workshops. The grant will cover the cost of trainers, supplies, meals, training the trainers, and organizing community ceremonies. Out of total program cost, 6. The remaining One of the highest budget lines is for the meals for participants.

    Every day of the 4-week-long workshops, the girls, their trainers and observer female teachers will receive a full meal. This adds up to 5, meals each year. While this is such a significant part of the budget, Her Turn provides participants with a full meal every day of the workshops for three reasons: Since the girls often come from poor households, feeding them takes the burden off their families and encourages families to send the girls to workshops.

    Meals provide an opportunity to use the experiential education model: washing their hands before meals is practicing the hygiene information they receive, and the meals illustrate the nutrition information.

    Cultural practices in these communities often prevent girls from low caste from sharing meals with others. Dining together combats these caste divisions which often prevent girls from mobilizing and addressing their issues as a team in a culturally appropriate manner.

    Her lips are a bright shade of orange. Meya, 21, a sex worker, is preparing to meet a client in Itahari, a city about 5 kilometres 3. Itahari, host to a highway that connects Nepal and India, which share an open border, is a boom town for the sex trade. The town is a popular destination for Indian traders who want to hire prostitutes.

    Read the blog. She stopped working when, in , she married a man she met at the hotel where she worked. The man was not a client of her or any other sex worker. But he left when Swastika, his daughter, was three months old.

    She meets customers during the day, when a neighbour looks after Swastika, because she tends to the toddler at night. With just an eighth grade education, Meya, who lives with her daughter in a rented room, says she has few options. Meya is a sex worker, but she only works during the day so she can care for her daughter at night. The sex trade is globally denounced for its ties to sex trafficking and forced prostitution, but in Itahari, a major transport hub in Nepal, the trade is booming because young girls with little education and few job options choose to work in it.

    Another survey conducted by Swiss relief agency Terre des hommes in estimated that between 11, and 13, girls and young women were working in the entertainment industry in the Kathmandu Valley. The sex trade generally pays well. The number of sex workers will keep increasing. Two years after she arrived in Kathmandu, a friend told her that she could earn more money by working in a factory. But when Meya agreed to the plan, the friend took her not to a factory, but to the hotel in Itahari, and left her there.

    After two weeks, she agreed to become a sex worker. Meya was 14 years old. The young teenager was popular with customers. Many men waited for spots in her schedule. There were five other sex workers in the hotel, but they were all between 20 and 25 years old. In some cases, Thakuri says, the girls are even younger than Nepalese girls are popular with Indian clients, Thakuri says.

    Some of the girls are barely literate, she says. I have to eat and I have to pay rent. They should be considered as trafficked. Sunita Danuwar, founder and executive director of Shakti Samuha, an organization that fights sex trafficking Kaphle, the joint secretary of the Ministry of Women, Children and Social Welfare says education is the key to curtailing the sex trade, especially for young girls.

    The government provides free education up to grade 10, he says. But Danuwar says free education is not enough. Access is a problem, she says. There are child marriages and domestic violence at home.

    She wants to connect her daughter with an organization that can support her. Related Stories.

    A decade-long Maoist insurgency from to sought, in part, to end entrenched feudal practices. After the conflict ended, political parties committed to reform and an end to discrimination, but years passed without agreement on a new constitution. Following devastating earthquakes inon April 25 and May 12, the four main ruling political parties announced that they had broken through a more than six-year deadlock on the formation of a new constitution.

    The new constitution does, however, provide for quotas to assist Dalit and marginalized groups. Implementing policies to end discrimination, and ensuring that those most in need benefit, still remains a challenge. International Context Globally, there has been increasing attention in recent years to the need to end child marriage. The growing attention to child marriage has been accompanied by greater donor support for work to end child marriage, and a mobilization of aid and civil society organizations working to support this effort.

    A number of countries with high rates of child marriage, including Nepal, have made commitments to reform. Many people in Nepal draw a distinction between arranged marriages and love marriages, based on whether the spouse is chosen by the parents or by the child or children.

    When it comes to the effect on the child, however, as well as the factors driving the marriage, this distinction is often irrelevant. Many of the factors that trigger love marriages also encourage children to agree to or ask for an arranged child marriage.

    Across dozens of interviews Human Rights Watch conducted with children who had had love marriages, the picture that changa pipe was one where the impetus to marry was often abuse, poverty, or coercion. Most importantly, children who choose their own spouses typically experience the same harms as children who have arranged or forced marriages. Love Marriages Human Rights Watch asked many interviewees for their views on the causes of the increased number of love marriages of children.

    Many blamed modern technology—including mobile phones and Facebook—saying that technology encouraged romantic relationships between children that would not have happened previously. Some saw increased school attendance as giving children more ways to meet potential romantic partners, with love marriages a result. Before they were obedient to what their parents said. These children said, while they may prefer the spouse they chose to one chosen by their parents, their first preference would have been to delay marriage entirely.

    She married at age 16 to a man who was 19 or 20 who she had met over the phone a year earlier when he dialed a wrong number and reached her by accident. Sunita did not tell her family that she was getting married. My parents wanted me to marry someone they had chosen.

    There were two or three proposals. We had difficulty finding two meals every day. I was made to work when it was my age to study. It was not forced marriage. There was no income, only expenditures in the form of four kids. I would work for 12 and a half rupees US 12 cents per day. When I fell sick they would all go hungry. Everyone saw what I went through. For some girls, marriage did mean they were more likely to have enough to eat.

    She is 15 or 16 years old, has been married for five years and has two children. We were very poor. Here we have some land to cultivate so at least we can eat.

    Khushbu Kumari married at the age of She is the oldest of six girls. Her father is a rickshaw puller and was struggling to support the family. He came to this village and looked for a wife by himself.

    We had no food and no proper clothes to wear. He and his parents are abusive to her. But there was no education. My father had a lot of goats and those goats were our only education. The government says that 44 percent of women and 23 percent of men never attended school. The most common reason for not attending school was that poverty had forced them to work instead. Other reasons that interviewees gave for girls not going to school included discrimination against girls within both families and schools, poor quality education in government schools, corporal punishment in schools, costs associated with education, and lack of water and sanitation facilities in schools.

    Poor Quality Education and the Impact of Gender Discrimination Many parents cited what they saw as poor quality of education in government schools as a reason that they—or their children—had not attended. The perception that government schools do not deliver adequate education drove some parents to make great efforts to try to pay for their children to attend private school instead, particularly in favor of boys.

    Parvati Satar said she went to school for only two or three days. My family was poor so I had to look after the home. He explained, however, that this should not been seen as a mark of progress for girls, but actually the opposite.

    There was some optimism that these disparities are declining over time. The principal of a private primary school in Sunsari district said that in the ten years that his school had operated, the number of girls attending had increased over time from zero to currently 40 percent of the student body.

    She said she asked her father not to get her married and offered to stay at home and work if she could not go to school, but he refused.

    She married at age One reason for this may be stigma attached to menstruation, and a lack of water and sanitation facilities at schools that would make it easier for girls manage their hygiene during menstruation without missing school days. Research suggests that in some areas up to thirty percent of girls in Nepal do not attend school during their menstrual periods, creating major and repeated gaps in their attendance and making them more likely to leave school entirely.

    If there are proper toilets, girls will feel better when they are on their periods and have to change their pads. Many girls stay home during their periods. Some of them left school because of this. Some got married then, some did not. Traditionally, girls and women during menstruation are considered unclean and are forbidden from touching or mingling with other people. In some communities in the far- and mid-western regions of the country, a more extreme version of this exclusionary tradition is practiced.

    As many as 95 percent of families in these regions practice chaupadi, where women and girls are confined to a shed during menstruation. In addition to often being banned from the home entirely, women and girls in families that practice chaupadi face many other restrictions during menstruation, sometimes including being barred from school. Even when not barred, girls often face social and family pressures to stay home during menstruation.

    In Nepal, Sex Trade Thrives in Transport Hubs

    She married at age 15 or 16, and left school at age I started working at age I had the responsibility of the house. Some were only paid in crops. I looked after a baby. But when I got there they never sent me.

    Women and girls often bear all or most of the responsibility for domestic labor in the household, including cooking, cleaning, caregiving, fetching water, washing clothes, and other work that is typically time-consuming, unpaid, and undervalued. Domestic work can be particularly backbreaking in rural areas with few facilities, such as running water. In many Nepali families, the brunt of domestic work customarily falls to young daughters-in-law. I eloped and he brought me to his house.

    I was in class five, but I left because I got married—I had to work in the house. Rojina Chamar said she started helping to weave baskets when she was three or four years old. She grew up as one of eight children in a family of basket weavers. They tossed me this bamboo weaving and we were poor, so I learned this rather than going to school. Nikita B. I took my brothers wherever I worked.

    When she was 13, her maternal aunt arranged a marriage for her to a man about ten years older than her. Her parents forced her to leave school and work as a domestic worker at age At age 13 she eloped. If parents are educated and girls are also educated, it will help in this matter.

    Discriminatory gender roles and social pressures drive child marriage and are an obstacle to ending it. This tradition encourages families to prioritize education, support, even food, for sons over daughters, and even to try to avoid having daughters. Marriage Immediately or Soon After Puberty As soon as a girl grows up, she has to be married off—as soon as she has her period. Sometimes the choice of a child bride is explicitly about ensuring virginity of the bride.

    So he wanted a younger girl. In this environment, unmarried girls and boys have great difficulty obtaining the information and contraception they need to prevent pregnancy, and when girls become pregnant, they often feel they have no choice but to marry immediately. Ritu Malik had a love marriage with a classmate when she was 15 years old and three months pregnant.

    I had studied a unit in school on family planning, but I had no idea how to do it. If I could have avoided getting pregnant, I would still be studying. Purushottam N. So we had to run away. Naveen A. I was the only son and my parents were getting old. She thought she would die [soon]. My grandmother really forced my parents to get me married.

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    The right age of marriage is 20 for boys and 15 for girls. They meant to warn me not to like other boys. These marriages may be motivated by a desire to avoid dowry, a fear that it may be difficult to find a husband for a daughter later on, or by social pressures in communities where this practice is common.

    She is 15 or 16 years old now, and married at age three or four. She came to live with her husband after a gauna when she was nine or ten years old, and has two children and was seven months pregnant with a third at the time of the interview. Narendra said he was ten years old before he understood he was married. When he was 16, his bride filme vox to live with him and they met for the first time since the wedding.

    You have to come back. In some communities, families believe that there are spiritual benefits to marrying girls before they reach puberty. There are not many female leaders who could serve as role models for Nepali girls and illustrate to them who they can be when they grow up. The Project Dining for Women will fund twenty groups of twenty girls to complete the four-week workshops of the Girls Education and Empowerment Project.

    Week Two: Safety — Girls learn how to deal with bullying, domestic violence, sexual abuse, early marriage, and human trafficking. Week Three: Leadership — The girls talk about empowerment and their strengths, plan their futures, and participate in a series of confidence building and team building activities. They also meet a female leader from their village or from Kathmandu and have a chance to discuss with her the advantages and challenges of leadership.

    Week Four: Community Project — Through consensus the girls decide upon and implement a community project that demonstrates their leadership and ability to transform their communities and schools. Whether decisions are taken individually, by small working groups or by the class as a whole, the emphasis is on the girls voicing their opinions and deciding what should be done. When working as a group, participants have to agree on certain decisions while trainers help facilitate group discussions and make sure everyone is heard.

    The program is designed to be comprehensive, locally sensitive and culturally appropriate for girls. The curriculum, however, is not fixed. The trainer answers the anonymous questions during following session.

    Consequently, the participating girls have direct influence on the curriculum. The member girls and a female teacher are elected by the rest of the group. The Committee is provided with a resource sheet where contact information to various local organizations is listed. The creation of the Girl Support Committee is an exercise in democracy. All the details, such as the name of the Committee, the members, and their positions are decided by voting and the process is facilitated by one of the trainers.

    Thanks to the voting process, the elected Committee members reflect the trust and sympathies of the whole group. Community Engagement — Over the course of four weeks, girls host community ceremonies where they invite school staff, their families, and local leaders. Female teachers are selected by students to observe the workshops and promote institutional sensitivity and support for girl-specific issues in the school.

    With just an eighth grade education, Meya, who lives with her daughter in a rented room, says she has few options. Meya is a sex worker, but she only works during the day so she can care for her daughter at night. The sex trade is globally denounced for its ties to sex trafficking and forced prostitution, but in Itahari, a major transport hub in Nepal, the trade is booming because young girls with little education and few job options choose to work in it.

    Another survey conducted by Swiss relief agency Terre des hommes in estimated that between 11, and 13, girls and young women were working in the entertainment industry in the Kathmandu Valley. The sex trade generally pays well. The number of sex workers will keep increasing. Two years after she arrived in Kathmandu, a friend told her that she could earn more money by working in a factory. But when Meya agreed to the plan, the friend took her not to a factory, but to the hotel in Itahari, and left her there.

    After two weeks, she agreed to become a sex worker. Meya was 14 years old. The young teenager was popular with customers.


    Nepali puti chekai 15 uears