Flecktarn vs multicam


  • Weapon Light – Camo Pattern
  • German Flecktarn Camo: A Difference of Dithering
  • Understanding Camo: The 13 Patterns to Know
  • CONCAMO Comparison Photoshooting
  • AOR2 Vs. Multicam: Which One To Choose [Know Differences]
  • German Troops go Multicam.
  • Weapon Light – Camo Pattern

    German Flecktarn Camo: A Difference of Dithering Share this post on social media: March 4, Flecktarn is a bold, cutting-edge camo seen across German military surplus as well as many other European countries. But where did it come from? Test patterns used many different elements from nature: shaped dots, ragged-edged leaves, thin pine needles and more.

    But when the trials were concluded, the final chosen pattern had no identifiable natural elements. But there is a rule to this randomness. The arrangement of Flecktarn uses a technique called dithering to replace hard natural edges with a soft, hard-to-detect transition from one color to another.

    In the same way, Flecktarn breaks up human-shaped fields into a blended background with no definitive shape or color. The same process is behind the modern digital camo in use by many armed forces, including the United States. But Flecktarn sets itself apart by replacing the pixelated squares with rounded dots.

    Which is better, squares or dots? Today Flecktarn is one of the hottest camo patterns in fashion, while still staying right to the top for reliable concealment during temperate-climate hunting and other civilian activities.

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    German Flecktarn Camo: A Difference of Dithering

    Some existing military camouflage and analysis of digital camouflage The new German Multitarn. Some existing military camouflage examples. Some examples and analysis of existing military camouflage patterns, plus a discussion about digital camouflage and camouflage in nature, and camouflage testing. Thanks very much to British camouflage expert Allan Osment for all his helpful comments. His knowledge of existing camouflage designs is exceptional and contribution to this page is invaluable.

    Digital patterns also usually have significantly more micro pattern, which in most cases is a definite plus in concealment in feature rich terrains, particularly at close quarters but the square look is unnatural looking.

    At a distance digital patterns may blend from top to bottom to form an easy to recognise human shape. The finger print dots influence can still be seen in more modern German Flecktarn camouflage. The square or rectangular pixel shapes or edges generally do not add any special advantage to a camouflage design, and are not discernible at a distance. In fact, rounding off corners and curving the straight lines produce a less noticeable and much more natural look, as in the superior Italian Vegetato digital fractal pattern below: Italian Vegetato Special Forces.

    Photo: Eric H. Larson, Camopedia. Disruption and optical division on a larger scale e. US woodland, US 3 colour desert, Flecktarn helps to break up the shape of the human body, making it look like separate, unrelated things.

    Depth makes something flat look like it is three dimensional e. Either of these, and especially a combination of these, deceive and confuse the brain, and make it harder to identify what you are seeing. Ornate Horned Frog. Very light and very dark on the edges accentuates the edges and produces the illusion of three dimensional depth.

    Photo: media. Camouflage David Clode. The detailed amoeba shapes provide a micro pattern which helps to conceal the wearer at close quarters. Camouflage design by David Clode. The curvy shapes in the camouflage design above look more natural and therefore are more effective than the squares and rectangles seen in pixelated digital camouflage. Simply because something is designed using a computer does not necessarily make it better, and many people are taken in by the idea that if something is designed on or by a computer it must by definition be better.

    One person, or perhaps two or three if they work together synergistically, will usually produce a better result than a committee. For these reasons, digital camouflage is not necessarily better simply because it appears pixelated, and was designed using a computer, and by many people.

    Of course, camouflage in nature is already proven to work. Timor python. The camouflage of this snake also employs optical division, where the front half of the snake has a sharp contrasting micro pattern, and the rear half is a plainer, duller brown. This can also be seen in the African Bush snake, Philothamnus semivariegatus, for example. Photo: hopezookingston. Has the overall edgey appearance of digital camouflage, with dithering of dark markings in the light areas but not vice versa.

    The dark areas also have a slightly darker edge which adds to the illusion of depth. Juvenile Eastern Water Dragon. Photo: David Clode. Close up, this works as a micro pattern, and at a distance, the red and green would mix optically like in pointillist paintings to form an effective dirty brownish colour. Photo: Snakebuddies. Photo: Eric Larson, Camopedia. After all, the original design would have presumably been crafted about 75 years ago by someone with creative genius and armed only with a paint brush!

    It is not actually essential to have a computer program to produce a digital camouflage design. For example, a tree fern frond is an example of a design in nature which is based on fractals three scales in this case, see Julia sets , but in the same way that an artist can draw or paint a tree fern frond, an artist can also design a fractal based camouflage design using human creativity.

    My general conclusion is that computer technology has brought about some major advances in camouflage, but for the very best designs, human creativity should dominate the design process, from start to finish, and perhaps especially at the start and at the finish.

    Some of my digital or at least pixelated designs are shown below to demonstrate that I am not by any means totally against digital or pixelated designs! I am able to improve most digital camouflage designs on request.

    Camouflage David Clode, render Glavis Loh. Camouflage design by David Clode, conversion to digital camouflage by Glavis Loh. Camouflage pattern designed by David Clode. A design which should work reasonably well in grasslands, grassy woodlands and woodlands. In a scientific test, it is usually best practice to isolate and test just one variable at a time if possible.

    If this is not possible, it is best to isolate and test as few variables as possible. Generally this will provide results which are clearer and easier to assess and interpret.

    Informed and appropriate modifications and improvements to the camouflage design can then be made. In both cases the colours are not quite right for this terrain but seeing he photo in black and white helps one to see that the tonal pattern and scale of the elements is excellent in both cases.

    Salisbury Plains, England. Photo: Allan Osment. The following picture taken in Gaza shows a typical urban design on the left, and traditional olive drab on the right. Neither is much good in urban terrain. Camouflage which is effective in urban terrain is a challenge to design.

    In this photo, neither camouflage pattern, tone or colour is much good. Designing good camouflage for urban terrain is a real challenge. If someone was standing in front of the red postbox, and they were wearing any colour other than red, they would be noticed.

    If they were wearing the exact same red, the moment they stepped away from the red postbox, they would stand out. Urban camouflage can really only hope to be dull and boring, and therefore not particularly noticeable. My designs attempt to simulate common construction materials such as concrete, aggregate, roads. They are wearing an over garment of port hole mesh, mostly brown, camouflage.

    This is extremely good, due primarily to the skill of the operators hugging the rocks, so that they look like part of the rocks , however, I believe it could still be better with more suitable camouflage. In addition, less skilled operators would be as difficult to spot if they were in more appropriate camouflage.

    Photo: IDF. A classic, and probably what most people think of when they think of camouflage. In the woodland terrain camouflage tests I have carried out US Woodland of summer weight NYCO colourway was always most effective at distances greater than 40 metres, but can work as close as 25 metres. US Woodland. US marines on recon exercise. Photo: Duffman-wiki. US Woodland — excellent in this dark woodland terrain. Photo: Allan Osment, New forest, England. Viewed sideways. So-called urban camouflage, This would not work well anywhere and has more to do with Andy Warhol pop art than serious camouflage.

    The stark contrasts means it would stand out nearly everywhere, which is fine if it is worn only for fashion purposes. The genuine US urban camouflage was changed, they transposed the white and light grey, the new version is also more effective in snow due to there being much more white on the pattern.

    Test and photo: David Clode. Photo: Military. Photo: Tridentmilitary.

    Understanding Camo: The 13 Patterns to Know

    As will tagging my name. I have learned on these online forums, that nobody proofreads anymore. Truly a lost art. Throwing a comma after every three or four words is not correct.

    Makes your post hard to read. They have different meanings.

    CONCAMO Comparison Photoshooting

    With very little pressure of wild life being hunted most anyone can harvest game for a limited time. The more you miss the more cautious the game becomes and the more important effective Camo, then again a poor shot usually can't harvest game with Camo.

    Sooner or later game will be hunted to the extreme to the point that more energy is used than is harvested in game. A point often missed by your "I can Live off the land" amateur that mainly lives in the cities and think they can have no BOB, no food and no water and with only a rifle they can survive in the country. Those types will be the main danger as time progresses. Coyotes, hawks, cougars, bob cats and of course me. The camouflage of this snake also employs optical division, where the front half of the snake has a sharp contrasting micro pattern, and the rear half is a plainer, duller brown.

    This can also be seen in the African Bush snake, Philothamnus semivariegatus, for example. Photo: hopezookingston. Has the overall edgey appearance of digital camouflage, with dithering of dark markings in the light areas but not vice versa.

    The dark areas also have a slightly darker edge which adds to the illusion of depth. Juvenile Eastern Water Dragon. Photo: David Clode. Close up, this works as a micro pattern, and at a distance, the red and green would mix optically like in pointillist paintings to form an effective dirty brownish colour. Photo: Snakebuddies. Photo: Eric Larson, Camopedia. After all, the original design would have presumably been crafted about 75 years ago by someone with creative genius and armed only with a paint brush!

    It is not actually essential to have a computer program to produce a digital camouflage design. For example, a tree fern frond is an example of a design in nature which is based on fractals three scales in this case, see Julia setsbut in the same way that an artist can draw or paint a tree fern frond, an artist can also design a fractal based camouflage design using human creativity.

    My general conclusion is that computer technology has brought about some major advances in camouflage, but for the very best designs, human creativity should dominate the design process, from start to finish, and perhaps especially at the start and at the finish. Some of my digital or at least pixelated designs are shown below to demonstrate that I am not by any means totally against digital or pixelated designs!

    I am able to improve most digital camouflage designs on request. Camouflage David Clode, render Glavis Loh. Camouflage design by David Clode, conversion to digital camouflage by Glavis Loh. Camouflage pattern designed by David Clode.

    AOR2 Vs. Multicam: Which One To Choose [Know Differences]

    A design which should work reasonably well in grasslands, grassy woodlands and woodlands. In a scientific test, it is usually best practice to isolate and test just one variable at a time if possible. If this is not possible, it is best to isolate and test as few variables as possible.

    Generally this will provide results which are clearer and easier to assess and interpret. Informed and appropriate modifications and improvements to the camouflage design can then be made.

    German Troops go Multicam.

    In both cases the colours are not quite right for this terrain but seeing he photo in black and white helps one to see that the tonal pattern and scale of the elements is excellent in both cases.

    Salisbury Plains, England. Photo: Allan Osment. The following picture taken in Gaza shows a typical urban design on the left, and traditional olive drab on the right.

    Neither is much good in urban terrain. Camouflage which is effective in urban terrain is a challenge to design. In this photo, neither camouflage pattern, tone or colour is much good. Designing good camouflage for urban terrain is a real challenge. If someone was standing in front of the red postbox, and they were wearing any colour other than red, they would be noticed.

    If they were wearing the exact same red, the moment they stepped away from the red postbox, they would stand out. Urban camouflage can really only hope to be dull and boring, and therefore not particularly noticeable. My designs attempt to simulate common construction materials such as concrete, aggregate, roads. They are wearing an over garment of port hole mesh, mostly brown, camouflage.

    This is extremely good, due primarily to the skill of the operators hugging the rocks, so that they look like part of the rockshowever, I believe it could still be better with more suitable camouflage. In addition, less skilled operators would be as difficult to spot if they were in more appropriate camouflage. Photo: IDF. A classic, and probably what most people think of when they think of camouflage.


    Flecktarn vs multicam