4 year old still wearing pull ups at night


  • How long should my toddler wear diapers or pull-ups?
  • Pull Ups and Potty Training
  • How I finally got my five-year-old to stop wetting the bed
  • Q&A: Solutions to Your Child’s Biggest Potty Training Problems
  • How to Help Your Child Stop Wetting the Bed
  • The Night-Time Potty Training Trick You Need to Try
  • How My Child Stopped Using Night Time Pull Ups
  • How long should my toddler wear diapers or pull-ups?

    Staring at that angelic little face can give you the utmost joy, especially since your home is now filled with the sweet sound of quiet! Here are some expert tips on ways to help your little one stay accident-free through the night. Decide if your child is ready As your child progresses from one developmental stage to the next, daytime potty accidents will become less and less frequent and your child will start to give you cues that they are ready to begin the process of potty training at night.

    If your child is beginning to wake up dry on occasion, you may be ready to take the next step. This is an exciting time for you both, but it can be challenging, too.

    This is simply because young children do not as yet have control of their bodily functions during sleep, and will not be jarred awake by their need to urinate during the night. Do not give them anything to drink after dinnertime, or before heading off to bed.

    Make sure your child uses the potty right before lights out. Take a few minutes to read to them, or keep them occupied in some other way while they sit on the potty, allowing for ample time to go, suggests Berk. Right before your own bedtime at around 10 or 11 p. Let them maintain control, but give them a way to follow through with your request. And remember to maintain patience at all times.

    Never force your child, but rather use gentle words they can understand. Make sure your nanny or babysitter follows the same procedure if they will be caring for your child during nighttime hours. Many children make it through the night dry, but need to urinate early in the morning before their household is up and running. Stay calm Easier said than done! Many parents get frustrated with their children for having nighttime accidents, but keep in mind that these are truly accidents, not willful acts.

    Haddock is a strong believer in using pull-ups or bedwetting alarms as tools to support kids in developing nighttime training awareness skills. Know that accidents happen All children will continue to occasionally wet the bed, sometimes for a year or longer, as they continue to master control over their bladders and bodies.

    Remember, your child is more upset by this than you are. Never use shame as a training technique, or react as if there is a big problem. Many girls will be fully nighttime trained at around 6 years old, with most boys following at around age 7. Appreciate this life stage As your child grows, so will their motivation to wake up dry every day. As frustrating as it might be at times, try to enjoy this slice of time you and your child have together.

    It goes by very fast.

    Pull Ups and Potty Training

    We're potty training our son, and he hardly ever makes it to the potty on time. Any suggestions? Put the potty wherever he is, even if that means leaving it in his bedroom while he plays, in the family room when he watches TV, or out in the backyard. Over time, you can gradually increase the distance he has to travel. Even if your child uses the potty during the day, it could take up to a year before she's dry at night.

    By kindergarten, most kids can wear undies around the clock. The two determining factors are how long your child can hold her pee and how deeply she sleeps. Here's the best strategy for giving it a try: Cut way back on drinks after 6 pm.

    Lay a few towels or a mattress protector over your child's fitted sheet before bedtime. Tell your child what's going on by saying, "You know what? We're going to see if your body is ready to wear underwear at night. Your body isn't quite ready yet. I am having trouble potty training my daughter who will be 3 in April. I've done everything that I know to do. My goal is to have her potty trained by her 3rd birthday. What should, or can I do? By three or three and a half most children should be able to be toilet trained.

    If she is successful at school I would talk to them about how they get her to go. Do all the children go at certain set times? Is there some sort of a reward for success or staying dry? Then try to replicate that at home. Setting a schedule can be helpful for some children i. Buy a few small toys the hang them one at a time from the shower curtain and tell her that when she is dry for the whole day she can have it at bedtime.

    Once she is successful a few days, make it two days for the toy and then three. If you can be consistent and not make it a negative experience she will likely succeed by your April goal. Carrie M. Brown My 2-year-old daughter knows what a potty is and what to do, but I can't get her to stay on the potty long enough for her to go. What should I do? Your 2-year-old is not ready to potty train. The definition of potty training is understanding the urge to go and the desire to be clean She should not have to stay there for very long to have success; most toddlers do not need time to read the sports page to poop.

    When they need to go, they go. Wait until she has mastered the developmental skills necessary to go to the potty and try again. Most parents have a few false starts before success.

    Ari Brown My two year old girl who will soon will be three does not like potty training. She has done pee pee a few times but after that just won't anymore. She cries when we try and put her on the potty and I've also taken her to the bathroom with me so that she can watch me do it. We've also tried bribes and its just not working. We don't know what else to do! At this point, I'd suggest you back off a bit as best you can! You don't want your daughter's potty training to turn into a power struggle; as she resists you up the ante of the conflict.

    I'd stop offering reminders about the potty. You want to follow your daughter's cues and lead. You want her to think that potty training was all her idea. But support her and set her up for success. Have a potty she can get to all on her own that she doesn't need help or a stool to reach. Keep up the conversations and great modeling talk about going pee and let her observe.

    But don't force or push her into the bathroom or place her on the toilet if it is isn't her idea. Eventually really—sometime before college, I promise she will explore potty training all on her own. When it's her idea and her time, and the right day for her, she will start down the road. As hard as it is, the most important thing you can do is let her lead the way. Good luck! I take her to her potty to try to get her to go but she sits there and does nothing but she will take her diaper off and gross I know try to play in it, wet or dirty.

    She usually doesn't get far before I catch her but she goes in her room to do this. Please help! Your toddler clearly is not ready to potty train, so don't make it easy for her to take her diapers off. One solution: duct tape. Not kidding. If you affix the diapers with duct tape, she won't be able to strip. Or, you can have her wear overalls, or some other equally challenging clothing item to remove. Bottom line: until she is ready to toilet train, keep her from being able to take her bottoms off.

    Ari Brown Why won't my son go to the potty at home? At school he pees for his teacher but at home, he just sits there. Usually, potty training also progresses more slowly in one setting than another. Encourage your son's potty training by letting him know you're interested in his progress at school. But let him decide his own pace, which is the best way to ensure that potty training goes more smoothly.

    It's the fate of all parents that our children show their true selves to us. This means they work harder outside the home and "perform" best for their teachers and babysitters, but they "let it all hang out" with their parents.

    Heather Wittenberg How can I get my 2 yr old to tell me she has to go potty before she does it? At the age of 2 she may or may not be aware before she goes that she needs to go to the bathroom. The first step in helping her to know when she needs to go or has gone is to get rid of the Pull Ups and let her wear underwear. Pull Ups eliminate the wet feeling that can be helpful in becoming aware that you should have gone to the bathroom. Scheduled potty times can also be helpful in establishing the habit of using the toilet.

    Start as soon as she wakes up in the am or from a nap and sit on the toilet for a few minutes every 2 hours. Celebrate the successes and be prepared to wash a lot of wet underwear until she figures it out. Brown My daughter is a very heavy sleeper and usually does not wake up to use the bathroom during the night. Do you have any suggestions on how to get her to use the bathroom during the night?

    The ability for the brain to "wake up" when the bladder is full is a developmental milestone that happens at different ages. Some kids will figure it out around the same time they potty train during the day, but it is normal not to be dry at night up until age 7.

    Unfortunately, you can't "teach" her to wake up by putting her in underwear and hoping she will wake up because she'll feel wet.

    You will only end up with a frustrated child and a wet bed every morning. If your daughter is school aged, start by limiting fluid intake or stopping fluids entirely after dinner so there is less urine produced overnight. For kids around 7, there are some behavioral training techniques and bedwetting alarms that can be effective, but they don't really work on younger children.

    Ari Brown My month old daughter has been pooping off and on on the potty when she feels like it since about months old. She has never peed on the potty and now refuses to try at all and will tell me she has to go but goes in her diaper instead.

    I have tried all rewards but nothing works. Does anyone know how to get passed this stubbornness? A child of 34 months is likely to be very sensitive to feeling pushed around, so cajoling, arguing, and focusing on a particular behavior has a low yield of success.

    You are right, I am sure, that the problem is not that she does not understand the idea of the grown-up toilet but that she is "stubborn. You can count on it! Your best strategy is to step away from the power struggle. You did not struggle to get your daughter to walk or to use words to speak or to eat with a spoon. These things came naturally, because her capacity to understand was growing and her observations of how the grown-ups do things led—naturally—to her wanting to do things the same way.

    Small children can see that babies use a diaper and that grown-ups use the toilet. Most small children will want to use the toilet and to use it successfully, especially if the parent helps them a bit with friendly suggestions about how it can be accomplished.

    When this process becomes a power struggle, the child's natural need to resist feeling pushed around becomes much more powerful than the child's need to imitate what the grown-ups do.

    Then the child is dead set on resisting the grown-up, even if it means continuing the babyish behavior. This struggle then can become a pattern which is hard to change. The best way to get beyond the battle of wills is to set the battle aside for a while.

    How I finally got my five-year-old to stop wetting the bed

    Risky, but I am sleep deprived and desperate.

    Q&A: Solutions to Your Child’s Biggest Potty Training Problems

    Results: took her to the bathroom 2 hours after bedtime dry! No self-initiated trips to the bathroom. Morning thoughts: My daughter is exhausted! The interrupted sleep is catching up with her. I am feeling discouraged and suggest that maybe it is too soon and we go back to pull ups. She adamantly refuses and states she wants to keep trying. Night 4 Results: took her to the bathroom 2 hours after bedtime; leaked 5am. Morning thoughts: We are both excited that she stayed dry up until 5am she usually is awake by 6 or Night 5 Results: took her to the bathroom 3 hours after bedtime trying to stretch out the morning hours ; leaked 5 am.

    Morning thoughts: She is a tired puppy, but stubborn! Morning thoughts: My daughter was ecstatic! I was incredulous and happy, but skeptical. Surely this was a fluke. Oh well, she loved getting her treat. Night 7, 8, 9, 10, and 11 Results: 6 straight nights of no leaking!

    I assumed she would have to start going to the bathroom at night. Somehow, she retrained her bladder. The definition of potty training is understanding the urge to go and the desire to be clean She should not have to stay there for very long to have success; most toddlers do not need time to read the sports page to poop. When they need to go, they go. Wait until she has mastered the developmental skills necessary to go to the potty and try again.

    Most parents have a few false starts before success. Ari Brown My two year old girl who will soon will be three does not like potty training. She has done pee pee a few times but after that just won't anymore.

    She cries when we try and put her on the potty and I've also taken her to the bathroom with me so that she can watch me do it. We've also tried bribes and its just not working.

    We don't know what else to do! At this point, I'd suggest you back off a bit as best you can! You don't want your daughter's potty training to turn into a power struggle; as she resists you up the ante of the conflict.

    I'd stop offering reminders about the potty. You want to follow your daughter's cues and lead. You want her to think that potty training was all her idea.

    But support her and set her up for success. Have a potty she can get to all on her own that she doesn't need help or a stool to reach. Keep up the conversations and great modeling talk about going pee and let her observe.

    How to Help Your Child Stop Wetting the Bed

    But don't force or push her into the bathroom or place her on the toilet if it is isn't her idea. Eventually really—sometime before college, I promise she will explore potty training all on her own. When it's her idea and her time, and the right day for her, she will start down the road. As hard as it is, the most important thing you can do is let her lead the way. Good luck!

    I take her to her potty to try to get her to go but she sits there and does nothing but she will take her diaper off and gross I know try to play in it, wet or dirty.

    She usually doesn't get far before I catch her but she goes in her room to do this. Please help! Your toddler clearly is not ready to potty train, so don't make it easy for her to take her diapers off. One solution: duct tape.

    The Night-Time Potty Training Trick You Need to Try

    Not kidding. If you affix the diapers with duct tape, she won't be able to strip. Or, you can have her wear overalls, or some other equally challenging clothing item to remove.

    Bottom line: until she is ready to toilet train, keep her from being able to take her bottoms off. Ari Brown Why won't my son go to the potty at home? At school he pees for his teacher but at home, he just sits there. Usually, potty training also progresses more slowly in one setting than another. Encourage your son's potty training by letting him know you're interested in his progress at school. But let him decide his own pace, which is the best way to ensure that potty training goes more smoothly.

    It's the fate of all parents that our children show their true selves to us. This means they work harder outside the home and "perform" best for their teachers and babysitters, but they "let it all hang out" with their parents. Heather Wittenberg How can I get my 2 yr old to tell me she has to go potty before she does it? At the age of 2 she may or may not be aware before she goes that she needs to go to the bathroom. The first step in helping her to know when she needs to go or has gone is to get rid of the Pull Ups and let her wear underwear.

    How My Child Stopped Using Night Time Pull Ups

    Pull Ups eliminate the wet feeling that can be helpful in becoming aware that you should have gone to the bathroom. Scheduled potty times can also be helpful in establishing the habit of using the toilet. Start as soon as she wakes up in the am or from a nap and sit on the toilet for a few minutes every 2 hours. Celebrate the successes and be prepared to wash a lot of wet underwear until she figures it out.

    Brown My daughter is a very heavy sleeper and usually does not wake up to use the bathroom during the night. Do you have any suggestions on how to get her to use the bathroom during the night? The ability for the brain to "wake up" when the bladder is full is a developmental milestone that happens at different ages. Some kids will figure it out around the same time they potty train during the day, but it is normal not to be dry at night up until age 7.

    Unfortunately, you can't "teach" her to wake up by putting her in underwear and hoping she will wake up because she'll feel wet. You will only end up with a frustrated child and a wet bed every morning. If your daughter is school aged, start by limiting fluid intake or stopping fluids entirely after dinner so there is less urine produced overnight. For kids around 7, there are some behavioral training techniques and bedwetting alarms that can be effective, but they don't really work on younger children.

    Ari Brown My month old daughter has been pooping off and on on the potty when she feels like it since about months old. She has never peed on the potty and now refuses to try at all and will tell me she has to go but goes in her diaper instead. I have tried all rewards but nothing works. Does anyone know how to get passed this stubbornness? A child of 34 months is likely to be very sensitive to feeling pushed around, so cajoling, arguing, and focusing on a particular behavior has a low yield of success.

    You are right, I am sure, that the problem is not that she does not understand the idea of the grown-up toilet but that she is "stubborn. You can count on it!

    Your best strategy is to step away from the power struggle. You did not struggle to get your daughter to walk or to use words to speak or to eat with a spoon. These things came naturally, because her capacity to understand was growing and her observations of how the grown-ups do things led—naturally—to her wanting to do things the same way.

    Small children can see that babies use a diaper and that grown-ups use the toilet. Most small children will want to use the toilet and to use it successfully, especially if the parent helps them a bit with friendly suggestions about how it can be accomplished.

    When this process becomes a power struggle, the child's natural need to resist feeling pushed around becomes much more powerful than the child's need to imitate what the grown-ups do. Here are some expert tips on ways to help your little one stay accident-free through the night. Decide if your child is ready As your child progresses from one developmental stage to the next, daytime potty accidents will become less and less frequent and your child will start to give you cues that they are ready to begin the process of potty training at night.

    If your child is beginning to wake up dry on occasion, you may be ready to take the next step. This is an exciting time for you both, but it can be challenging, too. This is simply because young children do not as yet have control of their bodily functions during sleep, and will not be jarred awake by their need to urinate during the night.

    Do not give them anything to drink after dinnertime, or before heading off to bed. Make sure your child uses the potty right before lights out.

    Take a few minutes to read to them, or keep them occupied in some other way while they sit on the potty, allowing for ample time to go, suggests Berk.


    4 year old still wearing pull ups at night