Pet speaking part 2


  • Top Tips for Preparing for the Cambridge PET Speaking Exam
  • pet speaking part 2
  • Speaking B1 Preliminary (PET): Guía Completa con Ejemplos [Actualizado 2020]
  • Useful expressions for your PET Speaking Exam
  • Cambridge PET Speaking Part 2 (online)
  • PET Speaking Part 2
  • |EE-031b| B1: Preliminary – Speaking Exam [Part 2: Extended Turn]
  • Top Tips for Preparing for the Cambridge PET Speaking Exam

    Candidates take it together with another candidate — sometimes there might be a third candidate taking it at the same time. So it usually takes from minutes. There are two examiners: one, who talks to the candidates — the interlocutor — and the other who listens at the back — the assessor. This second part, expects candidates to describe one colored photograph by themselves.

    This part is not done in pairs or trios. After this minute is up, the interlocutor is going to ask the other candidate to do the same about another picture. Candidates should keep their descriptions simple, and should not speculate about the context or talk about any wider issues raised by the photographs.

    They should use this part of the test to show their range of vocabulary, and also show their ability to organize their language using simple connectives. Candidates should describe the people and activities in the photographs as fully as possible. This may include naming all the objects, describing colors, clothing, time of day, weather, etc. Although, there might be a fourth person since there is a hand holding a green pen on the side. I think they are students because they are all holding a pen in the library, writing something on their notebooks or copybooks.

    What I am sure of is that they are quiet and concentrated in their notes. I think they are in the library because there are many shelves around them with books of different sizes and different colors. They might be preparing for a test or doing their homework together because on the table I can see not only their books but also a couple of tablets. As you can see, I tried using everything I could from the picture, I described: the room; the items on the table and on their hand.

    I just described what I could see with much detail as possible. There are cases, however, that the picture offers too many details, then you try to describe it as a whole and describe what is the main focus, for example: Cambridge English B1 Preliminary PET Speaking Exam — Part 2 — Extended Turn In this picture, I can see five people.

    They look like a family of five: the grandfather in the middle, sitting at the table between a younger man and woman, and two people standing up next to the table who seem to be even younger than the three sitting down.

    It may be a special day because on the table I can see many breakfast items like orange juice, jam, water, a fruit or a bread basket and some plates. Also, the two people standing up are holding objects on their back to prevent the person — probably the grandfather — from seeing the items. The young girl is holding a bouquet of flowers and the young man is holding a present. The people in the picture are smiling and cheerful. You could, if you need some more to fill in your minute, describe the garden and the house behind them.

    But remember that for this part of the exam, all criteria are assessed: Global Achievement, Grammar and Vocabulary, Discourse Management, Pronunciation, and Interactive Communication.

    Look at the pictures above and try to write down what you would answer!

    pet speaking part 2

    You will get top marks if you show you can speak for extended periods of time and also if you use more complex structures e. Here at Atlas, we encourage our students to understand and use this range of language in our A2 and B1 classes. There is also a focus on developing the techniques that will help you get the marks you need to pass the PET and move on to preparing for the higher level exams. Let us describe a few of the best tips that we give our students in classes that are preparing for the PET Speaking test.

    Get familiar with what you have to do. It is extremely important that you know what each part of the Speaking exam asks you to do and what it is you should pay particular attention to doing well in each part. Preparation is key to passing the exam. Part 1 You will be asked questions individually by the examiner. The questions will be about your life and you may be asked questions about the present, past and future.

    Focus on good pronunciation, and extending your answers just a little. Part 2 You will be given some images and will be asked to interact with your partner. You will need to discuss, make and respond to suggestions, and come to an agreement at the end. Listen to what your partner says and develop a conversation. Part 3 You will be given a colour photograph and, individually, will need to be able to describe and speculate about what you see for up to 1 minute.

    See below for more details. Part 4 This is a general conversation based on the topic of the photographs in part 3. Again, try to develop a conversation. You can find more information on how to do each part on pp. In part 1, you will be asked questions about your past, present and future. Make sure you answer in full sentences and not just a few words.

    We have also included some typical answers you could give. So, we strongly advise you to practise the answering the questions — putting your own information into the answers, of course.

    Questions about the past: Where did you go for your last holidays? How long have you been learning English? How did you get here today? Questions about the present: What do you most enjoy doing with your family? How often do you go to the cinema? What do you like or dislike about where you live? Questions about the future: Where do you plan to go for your next holiday?

    Would you like to live in another place? Do you think English will be useful for you in the future? Now, remember that these are just possible questions that you could be asked. Also, when you practise giving these answers make sure you use good intonation in your voice to make them sound more natural before you go into your exam.

    In this part of the test you will have to interact with your partner to build a conversation. Together, you will need to discuss, make and respond to suggestions, and come to an agreement at the end. Here is a list of useful language that you could use to improve this part. Asking your partner.

    Speaking B1 Preliminary (PET): Guía Completa con Ejemplos [Actualizado 2020]

    What I am sure of is that they are quiet and concentrated in their notes. I think they are in the library because there are many shelves around them with books of different sizes and different colors. They might be preparing for a test or doing their homework together because on the table I can see not only their books but also a couple of tablets.

    As you can see, I tried using everything I could from the picture, I described: the room; the items on the table and on their hand. I just described what I could see with much detail as possible. There are cases, however, that the picture offers too many details, then you try to describe it as a whole and describe what is the main focus, for example: Cambridge English B1 Preliminary PET Speaking Exam — Part 2 — Extended Turn In this picture, I can see five people.

    Useful expressions for your PET Speaking Exam

    They look like a family of five: the grandfather in the middle, sitting at the table between a younger man and woman, and two people standing up next to the table who seem to be even younger than the three sitting down. It may be a special day because on the table I can see many breakfast items like orange juice, jam, water, a fruit or a bread basket and some plates.

    Also, the two people standing up are holding objects on their back to prevent the person — probably the grandfather — from seeing the items. The young girl is holding a bouquet of flowers and the young man is holding a present.

    Cambridge PET Speaking Part 2 (online)

    The people in the picture are smiling and cheerful. You could, if you need some more to fill in your minute, describe the garden and the house behind them. But remember that for this part of the exam, all criteria are assessed: Global Achievement, Grammar and Vocabulary, Discourse Management, Pronunciation, and Interactive Communication.

    Part 2 You will be given some images and will be asked to interact with your partner. You will need to discuss, make and respond to suggestions, and come to an agreement at the end.

    PET Speaking Part 2

    Listen to what your partner says and develop a conversation. Part 3 You will be given a colour photograph and, individually, will need to be able to describe and speculate about what you see for up to 1 minute. See below for more details. Part 4 This is a general conversation based on the topic of the photographs in part 3.

    Again, try to develop a conversation. You can find more information on how to do each part on pp. In part 1, you will be asked questions about your past, present and future. Make sure you answer in full sentences and not just a few words. We have also included some typical answers you could give.

    So, we strongly advise you to practise the answering the questions — putting your own information into the answers, of course. Questions about the past: Where did you go for your last holidays? How long have you been learning English?

    |EE-031b| B1: Preliminary – Speaking Exam [Part 2: Extended Turn]

    How did you get here today? Questions about the present: What do you most enjoy doing with your family? How often do you go to the cinema? What do you like or dislike about where you live?


    Pet speaking part 2