Assamese film


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    The ensuing consequences of the War were unbelievably nightmarish for the people of Tezpur, who had to evacuate the town, when the Chinese troops were within striking distance of the oil fields of Assam, following the fall of Bomdila. The subject still whips up lingering memories for many of those surviving residents of Tezpur, who went through immense pain and suffering during that bleak, oppressive atmosphere. There have been a spate of Bollywood movies based on the Indo-Pak wars, but very few films have sincerely dealt with the India-China war of It is, therefore, high time that a movie dealing with the anguish and suffering endured by the citizens of Tezpur be told faithfully, evoking the period and providing a backdrop for the interplay of human emotions.

    The Sino-Indian War and the long series of events that unfolded has long been a vehicle of inspiration for writers and readers. The story focuses on the spirit and determination of a blind child hailing from a poor family of Tezpur and the role of a British journalist. There is also an intriguing love story that unfolds during the oppressive period. The film also depicts the release of the jail convicts and the inmates of the mental asylum and the humanitarian work of the Mission Hospital.

    There was a tremendous upsurge of patriotic fervour among the people, in particular, the youths of Tezpur, who were caught in a quagmire of dismay, fear and anxiety. The story ends with the unilateral ceasefire announced by China, and the retreat of the Chinese forces followed by the return of the evacuees and the happy union of the lovers.

    But despite the passage of so many years, the boundary disputes remain unresolved. Besides looking up the archives, Hiren Bora recorded a number of incidents and anecdotes in his diary, while interacting with the survivors and war veterans.

    The film promises to appeal to the senses and emotions of the audiences and might even rouse them to patriotic fervour. Earlier, the film came in for a lot of appreciation after a special show was held in a makeshift mobile multiplex cinema hall at the Assam Engineering Institute playground in Chandmari, Guwahati.

    Assamese Review

    A few scenes earlier, a child is born amid anxiety and expectancy. It is this child, now grown, who is forced to avert her gaze from her father. In another scene in Deuta Diya Bidai, we see one of the leads lecturing a girl at his college. In a dramatic shift of mood, the hero resorts to singing and dancing to explain to her the importance of Kaziranga National Park, Assam tea, and the Assamese hero Lachit Borphukan.

    A sense of insecurity runs deep in the minds of Assamese filmmakers. Even when they try hard to hide this insecurity under a patriotic garb, Bollywood or its symbols — Mumbai, the big city, money — assume an image of evil in their narratives. Another case in point is Jibon Bator Logori, released in This deals with the loss of traditional values in contemporary Assam.

    The kids of a village school teacher abandon their parents in search of greater goals in Guwahati, later moving on to Mumbai and the United States. It is significant that the son marries a Marathi girl. In the end the father survives on the support of the villagers, who are earnest, independent, and rooted to the earth, unlike his own children.

    The feeling of difference from other parts of India leads Assam in two starkly different directions. In Assam we now make an average of six films per year, an improvement from the earlier figure of 3.

    A state, or a bunch of states, if we consider the whole of the Northeast region, has been continuously running away from its past. The situation seems ironic if one looks back to the beginning of cinema in Assam. This film was the implementation of a radical idea, and even with its apparent technical frailties, challenged the prevalent tradition in Indian filmmaking.

    There were portrayals of stoical womenfolk more concerned with the edification of mythological goddesses than social responsibilities, illustrious instances of the past round divine love or undaunted leadership against antagonism. The movie was also a deviation from the then theatrical school of acting, where the line between theatre and cinema was almost non-existent.

    As a year-old, Handique was duped by her uncle into auditioning for the film. She paid a high price for acting in the movie at a time when women were not allowed even to watch theatre. Being Indian Rabindranath Tagore holds pride of place in our household. To my young mind it was difficult to figure out why only his picture deserved a place amid the pictures of a few close relatives and deities.

    Tagore acts as the common denominator of Bengali-ness across Bengalis from different caste, regional and linguistic backgrounds. Growing up as a non-Assamese in Guwahati meant that I was spared the burden of having to comply with any particular cultural norms — the Bengali language, at a rudimentary level, was part of the school curriculum, but beyond that, nothing related to Bengali-ness was given much importance.

    Partly, I should bear the blame; partly, the times should. Identifying myself as Assamese outside Assam has been much easier than doing so within. The immediate history of violence that preceded us meant that Bengali-ness felt like something shoved down my throat, something to rebel against.

    So I chose to be an Indian. As vague as that might sound now, the idea was romantic then. The first movie I saw in a theatre, at a very young age, must have been Khuda Gawah or Kishen Kanhaiya. To be an Indian, perhaps you should grow up on a strictly slapstick Bollywood diet. Those were the days when Doordarshan was sullenly but swiftly falling behind the curtains. With the liberalisation following , private broadcasters hijacked the Keltron TV in our drawing room.

    The green grasses, bicycles, gamocha and poverty of Assamese cinema felt unreal against the world of Celeste, Small Wonder and even the bottle which held captive Barbara Eden in I Dream of Jeannie. Standing in the middle, in comparatively progressive Guwahati, the unattainable held more significance than the grave prospect of travelling back in time.

    The difficulty has always been in the past. History, at least the immediate, contains a dreadful period of violence, neglect and impoverishment. To understand the failure of cinema as a commercial venture in Assam, one must take into account much larger factors than those common to the decline of regional cinema in other parts of the country.

    Assamese-speaking people only account for [around] An industry cannot survive on a handful of movie-goers. The India, rather than being the one nation that it is touted to be, often seems like a group of islands, each separated from the other by apparently large voids.

    Language, along with religion, has been responsible for drawing the borders of the nation and the mind. Sometime in September , during the Assam Movement it led to a brilliant spectacle which is a part of family lore. In the midst of simmering discontent, houses in flames and the stench of blood, my father, faced with the dilemma of having to choose between land and identity, life and compassion, chose to mingle with the revolting Assamese and, inactively, went forward with them as they moved towards further destruction.

    It is a pity that our film industry was never deft at handling genres of horror and action. While the Bengali-Assamese discord for us, fortunately, was part of history, the Karbis, the Bodos and Dimasas keep reminding us that Assamese even in the state of Assam is not a unifier. So are Assamese cinema and Cinema of Assam synonymous terms?

    This leads to further questions: how many Assamese, Bengali and Bodo are going to watch a movie in Karbi? And what is its reach beyond the secluded shrines of intellectual cinema? Cinema inspires cinema just as literature evolves from literature, and when the inflow is stopped, intellectual growth stagnates. That ban was followed by a series of bomb blasts in theatres refusing to obey the orders. The plan backfired and after the initial scares, Hindi movies were back in theatres and the life of the moviegoers returned to normal.

    At the receiving end were the Assamese filmmakers who, because of the dearth of screening spaces, resorted to releasing their movies on Video CDs. This trend still continues. Decline Assamese cinema has seen a steady decline from the almost mythical heyday of the s and s. Movie names like Gone with the Wind, Doctor Zhivago and Anna Karenina spill out of his mouth in a breathless string of words.

    He paints an image of a theatre full of twelve hundred people watching films in English, their understanding of the language being of no consequence. The film, although exemplary among critics citing the worst movies of all time, went on to become very popular among the working classes.

    The news travelled to the upper classes who, though maybe reluctant to admit it now, flocked to the theatres. But how have we progressed in the past few years? We have opened up malls with multiplexes, yes. We have made it mandatory for cinema halls to show the five Assamese movies we make for at least days a year, yes. But are these long-term plans aimed at reviving a lost culture? What have we done for the people from the nearby towns and villages, who till the mids, before terror bent their knees, travelled for hours in buses to theatres in Guwahati, just for their dose of entertainment?

    Did we ever sit back to analyse why mobile theatre Bhramyaman is considered a better alternative by rural Assamese than cinema? What have we done to reach the larger audience? Perhaps the way forward would be to go back to basics and begin from where it all started.

    10 stress-busting Assamese movies to stream this summer

    Kokaideu Bindaas Kokaideu Bindaas is a fun ride of romance, bromance, family, future and everything in between. It is a blissfully silly movie where the chemistry between the leads, Gunjan Bhardwaj and Monuj Borkotoky, gives the shred of substance the movie deserves.

    The Rise and Fall of Assamese Film

    A comedy where two brothers go on a road trip to discover life and face their challenges, Kokaideu Bindaas has the persuasive power to cater to the needs of people who do not own a critical eye. Nijanor Gaan Directed by Munna Ahmed of Joon Jole Kopalot fame, Nijanor Gaan depicts the journey of a struggling singer who soon after his rise to fame finds himself entangled in the web of life which includes his family and wife on one side and his passion and career on the other.

    The story of a common individual aspiring to achieve his dream is well captured in the emotions of the actors. Led by Jatin Bora and Amrita Gogoi, the good acting breathes life into the movie and makes Nijanor Gaan a deserving lazy noon watch.

    Award-winning Assamese film bridges understanding about the annual deluge

    The story about a small fictional village, Bokultol, it is about two rival youth clubs of the village, who are leaving no stone unturned to organize the best Rongali Bihu celebration in the village. It is a light-hearted satire, which gently unveils a mildly serious theme without spoiling on the fun mood of the movie.

    And like all stories of Himangshu Prasad Das, the film is also a comment on the Assamese society but with some humor and irony.

    It is a wacky investigation drama which also doubles up as an action thriller where Boro is a rough and tough cop who is certainly not to be messed with. Suspended from duty, he is unofficially handed over the task of leading an investigation into the case of a missing girl which leads the story of the film.

    Therefore, we have come up with this list of 10 Assamese movies in no particular order which makes for a perfect family entertainer. The best thing about this list is that there are no spoilers ahead. The movie tells the story of a father-daughter relationship in which actor Jatin Bora can go to any height to protect his daughter. Boasting of better cinematography and better action sequences, Ratnakar provides for everything that one can expect from a Jatin Bora entertainer.

    It also features an emotionally compelling love story which celebrates the Barasha Rani Bishaya and Jatin Bora duo in full strength. Kokaideu Bindaas Kokaideu Bindaas is a fun ride of romance, bromance, family, future and everything in between. It is a blissfully silly movie where the chemistry between the leads, Gunjan Bhardwaj and Monuj Borkotoky, gives the shred of substance the movie deserves.

    A comedy where two brothers go on a road trip to discover life and face their challenges, Kokaideu Bindaas has the persuasive power to cater to the needs of people who do not own a critical eye. Nijanor Gaan Directed by Munna Ahmed of Joon Jole Kopalot fame, Nijanor Gaan depicts the journey of a struggling singer who soon after his rise to fame finds himself entangled in the web of life which includes his family and wife on one side and his passion and career on the other.

    The story of a common individual aspiring to achieve his dream is well captured in the emotions of the actors. Led by Jatin Bora and Amrita Gogoi, the good acting breathes life into the movie and makes Nijanor Gaan a deserving lazy noon watch. Standing in the middle, in comparatively progressive Guwahati, the unattainable held more significance than the grave prospect of travelling back in time.

    The difficulty has always been in the past.

    Jaicheng Dohutia’s Assamese film Jolsobi invited to 45th São Paulo International Film Festival

    History, at least the immediate, contains a dreadful period of violence, neglect and impoverishment. To understand the failure of cinema as a commercial venture in Assam, one must take into account much larger factors than those common to the decline of regional cinema in other parts of the country.

    Assamese-speaking people only account for [around] An industry cannot survive on a handful of movie-goers. The India, rather than being the one nation that it is touted to be, often seems like a group of islands, each separated from the other by apparently large voids.

    Award-winning docu on female commandos, Veerangana’s TN link

    Language, along with religion, has been responsible for drawing the borders of the nation and the mind. Sometime in Septemberduring the Assam Movement it led to a brilliant spectacle which is a part of family lore. In the midst of simmering discontent, houses in flames and the stench of blood, my father, faced with the dilemma of having to choose between land and identity, life and compassion, chose to mingle with the revolting Assamese and, inactively, went forward with them as they moved towards further destruction.

    It is a pity that our film industry was never deft at handling genres of horror and action. While the Bengali-Assamese discord for us, fortunately, was part of history, the Karbis, the Bodos and Dimasas keep reminding us that Assamese even in the state of Assam is not a unifier. So are Assamese cinema and Cinema of Assam synonymous terms? This leads to further questions: how many Assamese, Bengali and Bodo are going to watch a movie in Karbi?

    And what is its reach beyond the secluded shrines of intellectual cinema? Cinema inspires cinema just as literature evolves from literature, and when the inflow is stopped, intellectual growth stagnates. That ban was followed by a series of bomb blasts in theatres refusing to obey the orders. The plan backfired and after the initial scares, Hindi movies were back in theatres and the life of the moviegoers returned to normal. At the receiving end were the Assamese filmmakers who, because of the dearth of screening spaces, resorted to releasing their movies on Video CDs.

    This trend still continues. Decline Assamese cinema has seen a steady decline from the almost mythical heyday of the s and s.


    Assamese film