Klipper firmware config


  • BTT Octopus: Analysis and Setup Guide with Marlin and Klipper
  • Anycubic Kossel Klipper configuration
  • Voron Design V0.1 Config
  • How to Install Klipper on an Ender-3 3D Printer
  • How to Install Klipper on Ender 6: Config and Setup
  • BTT Octopus: Analysis and Setup Guide with Marlin and Klipper

    This article is also available in following languages: November There are some crazy features packed into the XL like an always-perfect first layer! Nearly every aspect of the machine has been designed completely from scratch and it is truly a beast! You can even consider it to be a bit of a showcase for our future 3D printers. The first one was, obviously, the right size.

    We settled on 36 cm The larger a printer is, the more prone it is to vibrations and other unwanted effects that translate into bad-looking prints. So, building a larger MK3 would have no actual benefits.

    On the contrary, in fact. Using the same design would bring a number of headaches to deal with — a large heavy heatbed moving along the Y-axis, less stability with higher Z-axis values and so on. CoreXY was the way to go. Just an upfront note: we are aiming for print quality, not looking to join the SpeedBoatRace. However, we are considering an unsupported, but official Klipper firmware for those looking to find the limits.

    Either way, no matter how fast the XL will be in the end, huge prints several kilograms will still take days to finish.

    Plus, there are various practical additions like telescopic filament spool holders on the side of the printer, which can hold up to kg spools — they will be needed because the XL can chew through a regular filament spool in no time. New segmented heatbed With the dimensions set, we could also finish developing another one of the cutting-edge features: our new segmented heatbed.

    To explain it a bit: regular heatbeds have a tendency to warp as the temperature increases. However, once you have a large heatbed, the issues become more noticeable. We can do all sorts of things with the segmented heatbed — like alternating heating of individual segments in a checkerboard pattern via PWM , which reduces the load on the PSU.

    One of the obvious benefits is the possibility to heat only some of the 16 heatbed segments in case the printed object is small enough. Needless to say, the segmented heatbed was not developed just for the XL. Instead of an off-the-shelf load cell, we have developed our own system. It is embedded within the solid single-piece heatsink and it allows us to measure the physical load on the heatsink. We use analog data readings, which gives us precise information to work with.

    BTW — years ago, I actually had a load cell in the i2, positioned between the extruder and the hotend to measure force needed for extrusion. If I exaggerate a little bit, theoretically you could stick a plank of wood into the printer and it would still create a perfect first layer. However, the load cell sensor allows us to do more than that.

    We can now recognize a jam in the nozzle and pause the print. In the future, one of the things we want to focus on is the ability to detect a partial jam — so the printer could notify you in time before the actual jam happens. And maybe even detecting if the print has come loose from the bed. Gear up! To further upgrade the print quality, the extruder now features a brand new, internally developed zero-backlash cycloidal gearbox with a large no-slip drive gear. In fact, we implemented a bit of an overkill solution — a gearbox.

    It performs well above the power we see in most other extrusion systems on the market and delivers extremely high pushing force. And it works amazingly well. The Nextruder also features a brand new electronics break-out board with a dedicated CPU and a stepper driver, so basically, everything in the extruder connects directly to this board, which is then connected via a single-cable interface to an easy to swap connector on the edge of the new custom bit motherboard.

    This allows us to adjust the temperature according to the material spec and also detect heat creep. The nozzle, which has been developed in cooperation with E3D, is embedded inside an entirely new assembly that allows you to easily pull the entire hotend with all-metal parts out of the extruder. The nozzle is connected to a metal tube, which prevents various issues arising from insufficiently tightened nozzles.

    Making the nozzle easy to swap was key because we want to give you more options to print with nozzles of different sizes — e. To be clear, while it may sound familiar, this is different than the Revo system. While I could write much more about the Nextruder here, I want to keep some things for later. The right tools for the job Because XL is a CoreXY machine, adding tool-changing capabilities is something that kept coming to our minds.

    The result is that the machine can operate with up to five independent tool heads. The system is extremely precise and features a fully automatic tool alignment calibration ensuring that after every tool change everything is perfectly aligned. The system is also based on the load cell sensor — no more tedious calibration prints, everything is automated. Printheads will just tap a small calibration pin and configure offsets automatically. Check out the video because it shows everything in action!

    There are also sensors ensuring that the tool head has been successfully swapped. Because changer supports up to five tool heads, it means that you can: easily print soluble supports, print with up to five colors, or use vastly different materials because each nozzle can be preheated to a completely different temperature. If you simply need a large-scale printer, then the single-extruder version is the one for you. However, everything is ready for an upgrade, so you can run up to five tool heads.

    Once you install the optional tool changer mechanism, you can easily swap between two tool heads. This way, you can upgrade your XL gradually over time to suit your needs. In other words: if you buy a single-tool XL, you will be able to purchase the toolchanger and individual tool heads separately.

    By default, we will offer three versions of the XL in our e-shop: Single head, dual-head, and the full five-head version. It is very important for us to know the demand now so we can secure the additional components as soon as possible.

    This way, you can secure your place in line which we think will be again pretty long…. The reservation fee will be, of course, deducted from the total price of the order. This way, we can also better scale our production based on the demand. Happy printing!

    The Bigtreetech relay module gives us the shutdown control of our printer in a controlled way, such as after printing is finished.

    BTT Octopus In the same way as the relay module, the UPS module helps us to perform a correct emergency shutdown in the event of a power failure, something that together with the PLR Power Loss Recovery in Marlin will allow us to resume printing in the event of a power failure.

    You will find more detailed information in the next guide. The installation of a controllable led strip, either as lighting of the printing area or the notification of printer events, is a very interesting improvement. You can check our Neopixel guide where you will find more detailed information. The connection to a Raspberry Pi to manage our impressions. We have different connection options. This will provide us with a direct connection to our board without any problem.

    BTT Octopus Firmware Configuration Bigtreetech has once again paid special attention so that its electronics have the greatest compatibility and support with the most popular firmwares on the market, such as Marlin and Klipper.

    You can download them from this same link. For this we can add: In the case that you do not already have a comment, the line Typically most printers use 1.

    Used for Volumetric, Filament Width Sensor, etc. In the case that you do not know which one is exactly yours, we advise you to use type 1, which is usually the most standard. PID, the PID allows us to adjust the parameters that Marlin uses to control the temperature of our heaters without having fluctuations that could compromise the quality of our printing.

    This will allow you to dispense with physical limit switches, freeing your machine of extra components and cables. Drivers, as we have already mentioned, this board has 8 sockets for drivers supporting different types of drivers and their configurations. In this example we will use the ones that an Ender printer carries by default.

    Something very advisable to take into account to ensure that our prints always have a first layer that is as perfect as possible. We will start by indicating where our leveling sensor is connected.

    In this case we will connect it to the Z- limit switch connector. The Offset is the distance between the tip of the nozzle and the tip of the leveling sensor that, depending on where it is, must be positive or negative values.

    You can use the following graph as an example of what value to put in each case. In our case and as an example, our sensor is displaced to the left of the nozzle in X 30mm and 10mm in Y since that distance is towards the bottom of the printer.

    They tend to be a little more susceptible to being marked with blows but they have excellent adhesion, they do not limit the size of the bed and removing the pieces is extremely simple and fast.

    Either staples to fix the glass or the own mismatch of the beginning and end of the heatbed that makes the sensor unable to measure. Easy to identify as the motor will not turn properly and will stumble. That the motor rotates in the wrong direction. In this case again we have two options.

    The first and advisable one is to modify the motor rotation in Marlin. And the second, reverse the wiring of one of the motor coils. In our case we will choose the first one by modifying the following lines in Marlin. In our case, I proceed to invert the Z axis.

    This helps us in two ways. The first is to ensure that the sensor has a surface to detect the limit switch. The second would be to visually verify that our Offsets are correct, since the leveling sensor has to be perfectly positioned in the center of our bed.

    It is highly recommended to activate it and with our BTT Octopus we will not have memory problems. Although we do not have a filament sensor, it is still very advisable to have it active, since it allows us to improve the pause functions. So we will go on to edit the advanced options. Scroll and long file names, it is interesting to activate this function to be able to show the full name of the files to be printed.

    For it to work correctly we have to activate the following option. Not all screens that have SD will work correctly. Before suggesting how to use them, we refer you to the definition of pins in Marlin 2. FAN0, in this case we are not going to make any changes to its role since it is the layer fan and this is managed by the slicer itself to cool the filament.

    FAN1, in our example we are going to assign it to the hotend so that it is dynamically only activated when it is running. This way it will always be available and will show graphical enhancements in the setting to understand the direction of the setting on the screen. Sometimes our leveling sensor may have a specific failure and through this function it will allow us to try again a finite number of times. ARC support, a substantial improvement in the quality of our prints and also when we print through serial devices such as TFT, Octoprint, etc… It allows to simplify the gcodes commands, minimizing the number of movements and making them more fluid, also avoiding a large number of retractions.

    To use it we must configure our slicer to apply these changes or in the case of Octoprint we can use a plugin. Microsteps: Although we can configure from 16 to microsteps, we do not advise you at all to use a value other than With these microsteps, the definition that we could achieve mechanically is practically impossible to achieve with normal printers. In addition to the TMC drivers already perform the interpolation themselves to always offer maximum reliability and precision. Reliability is another important aspect when it comes to microstepping.

    The stepper motors that our printers carry lose torque and steps at high revolutions so increasing this definition of steps will exponentially increase the percentage of reliability and therefore that our parts do not come out correctly. In the following example we can see how we have 16 microsteps for our X axis.

    If this is our case, we will comment on the following line. This has to match the voltage used in our printer, in the case of Ender 3 and normally in all 24V printers. This will prevent more serious problems later. Although we can adjust it to our needs. Certainly very useful to obtain advanced information on the status and configuration of our drivers.

    This article is also available in following languages: November There are some crazy features packed into the XL like an always-perfect first layer! Nearly every aspect of the machine has been designed completely from scratch and it is truly a beast!

    You can even consider it to be a bit of a showcase for our future 3D printers. The first one was, obviously, the right size. We settled on 36 cm The larger a printer is, the more prone it is to vibrations and other unwanted effects that translate into bad-looking prints. So, building a larger MK3 would have no actual benefits.

    On the contrary, in fact. Using the same design would bring a number of headaches to deal with — a large heavy heatbed moving along the Y-axis, less stability with higher Z-axis values and so on.

    CoreXY was the way to go. Just an upfront note: we are aiming for print quality, not looking to join the SpeedBoatRace. However, we are considering an unsupported, but official Klipper firmware for those looking to find the limits. Either way, no matter how fast the XL will be in the end, huge prints several kilograms will still take days to finish.

    Anycubic Kossel Klipper configuration

    Plus, there are various practical additions like telescopic filament spool holders on the side of the printer, which can hold up to kg spools — they will be needed because the XL can chew through a regular filament spool in no time.

    New segmented heatbed With the dimensions set, we could also finish developing another one of the cutting-edge features: our new segmented heatbed. To explain it a bit: regular heatbeds have a tendency to warp as the temperature increases. However, once you have a large heatbed, the issues become more noticeable. We can do all sorts of things with the segmented heatbed — like alternating heating of individual segments in a checkerboard pattern via PWMwhich reduces the load on the PSU.

    One of the obvious benefits is the possibility to heat only some of the 16 heatbed segments in case the printed object is small enough.

    Voron Design V0.1 Config

    Needless to say, the segmented heatbed was not developed just for the XL. Instead of an off-the-shelf load cell, we have developed our own system. It is embedded within the solid single-piece heatsink and it allows us to measure the physical load on the heatsink.

    We use analog data readings, which gives us precise information to work with. BTW — years ago, I actually had a load cell in the i2, positioned between the extruder and the hotend to measure force needed for extrusion. If I exaggerate a little bit, theoretically you could stick a plank of wood into the printer and it would still create a perfect first layer.

    However, the load cell sensor allows us to do more than that. We can now recognize a jam in the nozzle and pause the print.

    How to Install Klipper on an Ender-3 3D Printer

    In the future, one of the things we want to focus on is the ability to detect a partial jam — so the printer could notify you in time before the actual jam happens. And maybe even detecting if the print has come loose from the bed.

    Just continue to the next step. To do this, you need to remove the four hex bolts behind the screen and underneath. Once you removed the face plate, unscrew the remaining four hex bolts which keep the touchscreen in place, in order to insert the Micro SD card into the screen. Power on your printer. This will start the installation process. When you start the printer again, the screen will only show the Klipper logo.

    The main menu will only show up after you connect Klipper to the board. Copy the Ender 6 Klipper config file Now that our Ender 6 is running Klipper firmware, we need to copy the configuration file. You can download my sample configuration to get you started. This is super easy. This action will trigger the connection between the Klipper service running on FluiddPi and the Ender 6 firmware we just installed. If all the steps have been followed, then your printer will connect, and you will be greeted by this interface.

    Feel free to home the printer first, to make sure everything is running correctly.

    How to Install Klipper on Ender 6: Config and Setup

    Heat up the nozzle and heatbed and check if the temperature rises as expected. If everything looks good, then you are ready to start your first print with Klipper. How to revert to Stock Ender 6 Firmware?

    If you decide Klipper is not for you, reverting to the stock firmware is easy. First, download the stock Ender 6 board firmware and the Ender 6 touchscreen firmware. This will trigger the board firmware update and the firmware will be flashed. Finally, connect the MicroSD card to the touchscreen, and start the printer.


    Klipper firmware config