School caning rules


  • Your Guide to Corporal Punishment in Florida Public Schools
  • Kids Keep Getting Hit at School, Even Where Corporal Punishment is Banned
  • Corporal punishment: regulations of individual schools
  • In 19 States, It's Still Legal to Spank Children in Public Schools
  • ‘It’s barbaric’: some US children getting hit at school despite bans
  • Corporal punishment
  • Your Guide to Corporal Punishment in Florida Public Schools

    Donate Now! To state Sen. Annette Taddeo, a Democrat who has worked for several years to ban corporal punishment in Florida schools, the Hendry County video is proof that physical punishment continues under the radar in her state. Department of Education. Both educators were charged with felony aggravated battery. Nationally, educators used corporal punishment on K students nearly , times during the school year, according to the federal Civil Rights Data Collection.

    Mississippi was the national leader, with educators there subjecting students to corporal punishment nearly 28, times in one year. The national numbers are likely a significant undercount, said Miriam Rollin, a director at the National Center for Youth Law.

    The same is likely true with corporal punishment, she said. WSJ Op-Ed Sparks Debate Over Corporal Punishment In Louisiana, where educators are generally allowed to strike students, state and federal data show that children with disabilities continue to be subjected to corporal punishment despite a state law that banned its use on youth with special needs.

    In fact, state data show that Louisiana educators continued to use corporal punishment on children with disabilities as recently as last year. Ted Beasley, the Louisiana Department of Education spokesman, said he was aware that districts continue to subject children with disabilities to corporal punishment despite the ban. He said that parents could file formal complaints with the department if they believe their children were subjected to corporal punishment in violation of federal special education law that affords students with disabilities additional protections, but none have taken that step.

    A few offered explanations. Data show that children with disabilities were subjected to corporal punishment at Caddo Parish Public Schools in Shreveport during both the and school years. She said the district has since banned the use of corporal punishment on all students, including those without disabilities, and has trained educators to use restorative justice and recognize the effects of childhood trauma. The Vernon Parish School District in Leesville reported 21 instances of corporal punishment on children with disabilities during the and school years, according to the state and federal data.

    But Assistant Superintendent Mike Kay denied that any of the instances ran afoul of the state law. But Taddeo, the state senator, suspects the practice persists elsewhere. District policy prohibits corporal punishment in Broward County schools and an education committee found probable cause of alleged battery, yet her only punishment was a letter of reprimand, according to the Miami Herald.

    So it needs to end. And in many parts of the country, it is. New Jersey became the first state to ban the practice in schools — in — and all but 19 have since followed suit, most recently New Mexico in Today, a considerable body of research suggests the practice can lead to significant and lifelong harms. National groups including the American Academy of Pediatrics and the American Psychological Association have urged educators and parents to refrain from relying on corporal punishment, arguing that it does not bring about improvements in student behavior, but instead could cause emotional, behavioral and academic problems.

    Among them is a study in the peer-reviewed Journal of Pediatrics , which found that children who are spanked are far more likely to abuse intimate partners later in life. In the s, about 4 percent of U. During that time, lawmakers have increasingly put limits on its use.

    Even in states where the practice remains legal, school districts have imposed their own bans and in Mississippi, the state which outranks all others in striking students, lawmakers prohibited educators from spanking children with disabilities in In fact, 96 percent of public schools in the U. Among them is Ted Roush, the superintendent of the Suwannee County school district in northern Florida.

    Louisiana state Rep. Danny McCormick, a Republican, offered a similar perspective. The report , published this year in the journal Social Problems, found that in places where lynching was once routine, schools are more likely to rely on corporal punishment today — especially against Black students.

    Franklin Foil, a Republican, recognizes that some in his state continue to support corporal punishment in classrooms. So when he proposed legislation to regulate its use in , he focused on children with disabilities after parents with negative experiences brought the issue to his attention.

    It was a smart political strategy. While his bill passed, legislation to ban the practice outright failed, albeit by a much larger margin, 34 in favor to 61 against , than the same effort earlier this month. Though he supports a complete ban, he acknowledges it faces steep obstacles, including from school administrators who believe that state lawmakers should stay out of their business.

    As research on the deleterious effects of corporal punishment builds, Jackson believes that even more educators will turn away from the practice altogether.

    Kids Keep Getting Hit at School, Even Where Corporal Punishment is Banned

    Summary of necessary legal reform to achieve full prohibition Prohibition is still to be achieved in the home, alternative care settings, day care and schools. The near universal acceptance of a certain degree of violence in childrearing necessitates clarity in law that no degree of corporal punishment is acceptable or lawful. These articles should be repealed and prohibition of all corporal punishment should be enacted in relation to parents and all those with parental authority.

    Alternative care settings — Prohibition should be enacted in legislation applicable to all alternative care settings foster care, institutions, places of safety, emergency care, etc. Schools — All legal provisions authorising the use of corporal punishment in schools should be repealed and prohibition enacted in relation to all education settings, public and private.

    Current legality of corporal punishment Home Corporal punishment is lawful in the home. The Persons with Disability Act is silent on the issue. The review is in part informed by the recommendations of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission, published in The Commission recommended that corporal punishment of children be prohibited in the home and schools see extract below ; it is also building on the previous constitutional review in , which similarly considered the recommendations of the Truth and Reconciliation Committee but did not recommend prohibition of corporal punishment.

    The review was due to take place after the March elections. We have no further information. It should reportedly be inflicted by the principal only or by female teachers on girls, but we have been unable to identify specific legislation or regulations governing how it is administered. Despite the recommendations of the Sierra Leone Truth and Reconciliation Commission to prohibit corporal punishment in schools, the Education Act is silent on the issue.

    Although the apparent aim of the text is to eliminate the use of corporal punishment, no explicit prohibition is included. In addition, the Code of Conduct is policy, not law. As such it is undermined by the above legislative provisions providing legal defences for the use of corporal punishment against children, and does not achieve equal legal protection for children from assault in schools. Sierra Leone endorsed the Safe to Learn call to action in this includes a commitment to prohibit corporal punishment in schools and promote positive discipline.

    Penal institutions Corporal punishment is unlawful under the Correctional Services Act We are seeking to verify reports that it prohibits corporal punishment and repeals article 73 of the Prison Rules and article 57 of the Prison Ordinance , which allow for corporal punishment.

    There is no provision for corporal punishment as a sentence in the Local Courts Act No recommendations were made concerning corporal punishment of children. The Committee recommends that the State party strengthen its awareness-raising programmes, including campaigns among parents and relevant professional groups, on alternative methods of discipline, raise awareness of parents and children on the Code of Conduct and strengthen and enforce sanctions to make teachers and all personnel working with children accountable for violating the Code.

    However, the Committee is concerned that corporal punishment is not prohibited and, in fact, is widely practiced in homes, schools or alternative care contexts and detention centres.

    The Committee is also concerned at the alleged use of corporal punishment and solitary confinement for prisoners, as permitted by the Prison Ordinance Act of and the Prison Rules of , as well as reduction in diet and the use of handcuffs and other means of restraint as a punishment arts.

    The State party should: a ensure that the Correctional Services Bill, aimed at replacing the Prison Ordinance Act of and the Prison Rules of , is promptly adopted and complies with the commitment taken by the State delegation to eliminate corporal punishment and solitary confinement The Committee reminds the State party of the commitment it made during the dialogue with the Committee and recommends that it take the necessary legislative measures to explicitly prohibit corporal punishment in all settings, conduct public awareness-raising campaigns about its harmful effects, and promote positive nonviolent forms of discipline as an alternative to corporal punishment.

    The Committee is particularly concerned about the persistence of customary law and cultural practices that consider the physical chastisement of family members, in particular women, acceptable….

    It urges the State party to raise public awareness through media and education programmes that all forms of violence against women, including domestic violence, are unacceptable The State party should take practical steps, including through legislative measures where appropriate, to put an end to corporal punishment in all settings.

    It should encourage non-violent forms of discipline as alternatives to corporal punishment, and should conduct public information campaigns to raise awareness about its harmful effects. However, sources of the Committee indicate that various forms of violence, including physical, physiological and sexual abuse, are still being perpetrated against children. In particular, the Committee was informed that corporal punishment is prevalent within the home and school settings. During the Constructive dialogue with the State Party, the Committee has also observed that the Child Rights Act tolerates reasonable punishment being perpetrated against children; the Committee recommends the State Party to repeal the relevant clause in the Act with a view to completely prohibit corporal punishment in all settings.

    In particular every child has the right to be protected from maltreatment, neglect, abuse or degradation. Children are still subject to institutional physical abuse through the use of corporal punishment at schools and in homes.

    The government school system that arose in the days of colonial rule adopted nineteenth-century British traditions of school discipline, including that of beating children.

    The use of beatings for purposes of correcting behaviour in schools legitimises violence as a means to control behaviour more generally. This message goes out to both children and adults. The message says that hurting others is acceptable behaviour. The consequence of corporal punishment is to encourage physical aggression throughout society.

    For some children, physical scars and disabilities remain a life-long reminder of the educational system's brutality. Children are entitled to receive education in an environment of freedom and dignity, free from fear. There is no justification for permitting another generation of children to be subjected to brutality, whether this is in the name of education or ideology. The Commission recommends the outlawing of corporal punishment against children, whether this be in schools or the home.

    This is an imperative recommendation. Sixty-five per cent experienced physical punishment, The study found compelling evidence that levels of abuse corporal punishment, bullying and sexual abuse are very high and require immediate and urgent action from all authorities concerned. Bangura, K.

    Corporal punishment: regulations of individual schools

    The same is likely true with corporal punishment, she said. WSJ Op-Ed Sparks Debate Over Corporal Punishment In Louisiana, where educators are generally allowed to strike students, state and federal data show that children with disabilities continue to be subjected to corporal punishment despite a state law that banned its use on youth with special needs.

    In 19 States, It's Still Legal to Spank Children in Public Schools

    In fact, state data show that Louisiana educators continued to use corporal punishment on children with disabilities as recently as last year. Ted Beasley, the Louisiana Department of Education spokesman, said he was aware that districts continue to subject children with disabilities to corporal punishment despite the ban.

    He said that parents could file formal complaints with the department if they believe their children were subjected to corporal punishment in violation of federal special education law that affords students with disabilities additional protections, but none have taken that step.

    A few offered explanations. Data show that children with disabilities were subjected to corporal punishment at Caddo Parish Public Schools in Shreveport during both the and school years.

    She said the district has since banned the use of corporal punishment on all students, including those without disabilities, and has trained educators to use restorative justice and recognize the effects of childhood trauma. The Vernon Parish School District in Leesville reported 21 instances of corporal punishment on children with disabilities during the and school years, according to the state and federal data.

    ‘It’s barbaric’: some US children getting hit at school despite bans

    But Assistant Superintendent Mike Kay denied that any of the instances ran afoul of the state law. But Taddeo, the state senator, suspects the practice persists elsewhere. District policy prohibits corporal punishment in Broward County schools and an education committee found probable cause of alleged battery, yet her only punishment was a letter of reprimand, according to the Miami Herald.

    So it needs to end. And in many parts of the country, it is. New Jersey became the first state to ban the practice in schools — in — and all but 19 have since followed suit, most recently New Mexico in Today, a considerable body of research suggests the practice can lead to significant and lifelong harms.

    Corporal punishment

    National groups including the American Academy of Pediatrics and the American Psychological Association have urged educators and parents to refrain from relying on corporal punishment, arguing that it does not bring about improvements in student behavior, but instead could cause emotional, behavioral and academic problems.

    Among them is a study in the peer-reviewed Journal of Pediatricswhich found that children who are spanked are far more likely to abuse intimate partners later in life. In the s, about 4 percent of U. During that time, lawmakers have increasingly put limits on its use. Read more That the prohibition in her own school district did not protect the Florida first-grader from being hit is just one example of how corporal punishment persists even in places where the practice is explicitly outlawed.

    About a dozen school districts in states where corporal punishment is banned reported using it on students more than times during the school year, according to an analysis by The 74 of the most recent civil rights data from the US Department of Education. And in Louisiana, a state where paddling is permitted except on students with disabilities, data shows that special education students were hit nearly times in Years of data have shown that students of color and those with disabilities are disproportionately subjected to corporal punishment, a practice that goes on despite a substantial body of research showing its harmful effects on youth development.

    To the state senator Annettee Taddeo, a Democrat who has worked for several years to ban corporal punishment in Florida schools, the Hendry county video is proof that physical punishment continues under the radar in her state. Both educators were charged with felony aggravated battery.

    Nationally, educators used corporal punishment on K students nearlytimes during the school year, according to the federal Civil Rights Data Collection. Mississippi was the national leader, with educators there subjecting students to corporal punishment nearly 28, times in one year.

    The national numbers are likely to be a significant undercount, said Miriam Rollin, a director at the National Center for Youth Law.

    Every school district in the country self-reports its data to the federal government and they have long been accused of underreporting data on the use of restraint and seclusion. The same is probably true with corporal punishment, she said. In Louisiana, where educators are generally allowed to strike students, state and federal data shows that children with disabilities continue to be subjected to corporal punishment in more than a dozen districts, despite a state law that banned its use on youth with special needs.

    In one example, data show that children with disabilities were subjected to corporal punishment at Caddo parish public schools in Shreveport during both the and school years.


    School caning rules