Ddo barbarian


  • Which DDO classes are optimal or sub optimal to play as a Half-Orc
  • Dollard-based Barbarians rugby club gearing up for 2021 outdoor season
  • Marten Merriweather, Shifter Barbarian
  • 20+ Best Builder Hall 4 Base Links 2021 (New!) | Anti 2 Stars
  • Post navigation
  • A Pure Barbarian Build.
  • Which DDO classes are optimal or sub optimal to play as a Half-Orc

    Look more closely! Look really closely! Just kidding: they are all the same. A field guide is an illustrated book that one uses to help identify types of wildlife.

    In this case, we will learn how to differentiate between the different types of wild barbarian. Thank you for your purchase! Time to start identifying! A barbarian in the wild! Quickly, look for the traits that we can quickly use to tell one barbarian from the next: Does your subject barbarian hit really hard?

    Does it have a lot of healing amplification? Are there many hit points? Many, many hit points? Does it have a smidgeon of self-healing? If all of these traits are present in your barbarian, then it must be … ummm wait … there must be some mistake … Hmmmm. Apparently all of the barbarians share all of these aspects. And that, sadly, is my main impression of the new changes to Barbarian being previewed on the forums by the Turbine development team.

    They are all the same. To be clear, I am not saying that they are identical; that would be silly. Someone put a lot of thought into making the details of each of the three trees different. This barbarian self-heals every time it hits. This barbarian self-heals all at once with a cooldown timer.

    This barbarian self-heals with a counter that increases over time. Yes, those kinds of differences exist. But those kinds of differences are not really different. Not really, no. Occult Slayer gets more hit points, healing amp, self-healing, some special attacks, and some special defenses against casters. Frenzied Berzerker gets more hit points, healing amp, self-healing, and some special attacks that do melee damage in an AoE.

    To be fair, one has to take into effect the fact that this lack of differentiation is not exclusive to DDO, but in fact exists in the pen and pencil Dungeons and Dragons too.

    A barbarian is a barbarian is a barbarian. I touched on this point yesterday. If you consider the source material, the main differences between one flavor of barbarian and the next are roleplaying. For instance, Ravagers are supposed to be evil , sort of like wild paladins belonging to a death goddess.

    This would be a big impediment to playing a Ravager in most tabletop campaigns; a big, big difference between the Ravager and other barbarians. But DDO is not tabletop, and role-playing differences do not matter in the slightest. Leaving us with three very similar flavors of the same barbarian. Even after the new changes are implemented. How disappointing. To consider this in context, take the recent, generally well-received changes to the Bard. With the three Bard enhancement trees, a person can choose between a melee bard, a spell-casting bard, or a singing bard.

    Each tree represents an entirely different playing style. Very different, one from the other. Take another example: Cleric trees allow a cleric to heal, or melee, or be an offensive caster. Differences that are truly different!

    Now barbarians again: Ravager, Frenzied Berzerker and Occult Slayer all melee, have a lot of hit points, and are being modified to also have a lot of healing amplification and some self-healing.

    All three. The same play style. And there was such potential! Imagine if the three trees had real differences: One type of barbarian could be super-strong, getting all kinds of bonuses based on THF and doing more damage per hit than anything at the cost of defenses of course.

    I expected to be going through each of the new trees in detail today, but in the process, I realized just how disappointed I am. Barbarians are getting a facelift but that is all. It will be possible to build a better barbarian than one can build today, but not by a lot. And certainly not in more than one style. I love playing barbarians. I used to have two but am down to one.

    I still owe you all a detailed discussion. Hopefully tomorrow I will be past my disappointment and able to focus on the specific changes. There is always hope for tomorrow.

    Dollard-based Barbarians rugby club gearing up for 2021 outdoor season

    Which DDO classes are optimal or sub optimal to play as a Half-Orc dungeons-dragons-online I was thinking of playing a half-orc character in DDO but realised that I'm not sure which classes are good or bad to play as a half-orc.

    They have high Strength so melee seems to be favoured, but what about enhancements? Which of the DDO classes are a good choice for a half-orc and which are a bad choice? Artificer - Intelligence affects spellcasting ability, and Strength is of limited use. Bard - Charisma is very important for a Bard's spellcasting. Cleric - Charisma affects a Cleric's ability to Turn Undead.

    Favored Soul - Spell points are increased by having high Charisma. Paladin - While the Strength bonus is very beneficial, losing Charisma hurts their ability to Smite Evil, Lay on Hands, Turn Undead, as well as their passive saving throw bonus. Rogue - Intelligence allows extra skills, which are very important for a Rogue's utility.

    Additionally, a number of Rogue skills use Charisma as their relevant stat. Sorcerer - Charisma is their key stat for spellcasting, and Strength is of limited use. Wizard - Intelligence is their key stat for spellcasting, and Strength is of limited use. Barbarians and Fighters are the most optimal classes for Half-Orcs as they do not use Int and Cha significantly, and benefit the most from the Strength increase.

    The Half-Orc favored class is Barbarian. Monks use Charisma a small amount, but the Strength increase nullifies any downsides. Ranger skills utilize Charisma, but combat abilities are not significantly affected from Int or Cha loss. A melee oriented ranger benefits from the extra Strength. Druids are marginally affected by the ability scores from being a Half-Orc. Their primary statistic is Wisdom.

    Marten Merriweather, Shifter Barbarian

    But those kinds of differences are not really different. Not really, no. Occult Slayer gets more hit points, healing amp, self-healing, some special attacks, and some special defenses against casters.

    20+ Best Builder Hall 4 Base Links 2021 (New!) | Anti 2 Stars

    Frenzied Berzerker gets more hit points, healing amp, self-healing, and some special attacks that do melee damage in an AoE. To be fair, one has to take into effect the fact that this lack of differentiation is not exclusive to DDO, but in fact exists in the pen and pencil Dungeons and Dragons too. A barbarian is a barbarian is a barbarian. I touched on this point yesterday.

    If you consider the source material, the main differences between one flavor of barbarian and the next are roleplaying. For instance, Ravagers are supposed to be evilsort of like wild paladins belonging to a death goddess.

    This would be a big impediment to playing a Ravager in most tabletop campaigns; a big, big difference between the Ravager and other barbarians. But DDO is not tabletop, and role-playing differences do not matter in the slightest. Leaving us with three very similar flavors of the same barbarian. Even after the new changes are implemented. How disappointing. To consider this in context, take the recent, generally well-received changes to the Bard. With the three Bard enhancement trees, a person can choose between a melee bard, a spell-casting bard, or a singing bard.

    Each tree represents an entirely different playing style. Very different, one from the other. Take another example: Cleric trees allow a cleric to heal, or melee, or be an offensive caster.

    Differences that are truly different! Now barbarians again: Ravager, Frenzied Berzerker and Occult Slayer all melee, have a lot of hit points, and are being modified to also have a lot of healing amplification and some self-healing.

    All three.

    Post navigation

    The same play style. And there was such potential! Imagine if the three trees had real differences: One type of barbarian could be super-strong, getting all kinds of bonuses based on THF and doing more damage per hit than anything at the cost of defenses of course. I expected to be going through each of the new trees in detail today, but in the process, I realized just how disappointed I am.

    Barbarians are getting a facelift but that is all. It will be possible to build a better barbarian than one can build today, but not by a lot. But then, one of the acolytes in my new mostly-Monk guild, The Syncletican Monastery on Ghallandaappeared with a Monk of the Shifter race. At first, I admit that the appearance threw me off.

    The Shifter has a very primal, animalistic look, not unlike that of a werewolf which, of course, is where the class is descended from. But then I watched Kemai at work with his Shifter, which has unique movements to any other Monk.

    A Pure Barbarian Build.

    I fell in love with it right away, and worked to clear out a character slot, occupied by a sad inactive Gnome Wizard in my list of characters, to build one of my own. I find myself learning how Barbarians work without actually being one. Meet Floracletica. Right off, you can see how the Shifter race appears in attack mode. The character building for a Shifter shows very different hair and facial features.

    These, of course, change nothing of the gameplay, but did put me off in terms of aesthetics at first I find myself always gravitating to humanoids and less to the blends like Warforged until I was able to find a Shifter face that looked placid and even lovely, as if she were of a regal line of humanoid lions. Shifters, apparently, are always barefooted. Having never played a Barbarian in class or kind, I decided to create Flora at level 1 rather than L4 or higher Veteran options to get a feel for what the class does and does not do from the very start.

    I am not at all disappointed so far. From what I am able to interpret thus far from reviewing the racial enhancement trees and other info from the DDO Wiki, the Shifter specializes in enhancing attack and defense while also providing a stacking bonus via Rage.

    Normally, I steer clear of using Rage through potions as this can negate other Monk attack or defense abilities, like the Combat Expertise feat. I think I am wrong here as only the Barbarian version might prohibit spellcasting or the Combat Expertise to work.

    But these characteristics are innate to the Shifter, so if my Monk was to move forward, I needed to learn to embrace how Rage works.

    So I can drink a Potion of Rage that will stack with the effect. I did test whether the granted feat for all players, Defensive Fighting, a lesser version of Combat Expertise, would disable itself with the use of Shifter raging.


    Ddo barbarian