Walking the labyrinth eastern star


  • BOOK REVIEW: Lisa Goldstein’s Walking The Labyrinth & 2014 Year-end
  • SFU ventures into spirituality with labyrinth
  • Experience the Kingsboro Labyrinth – A Walk to Wish On!
  • Walking a Labyrinth Exposed 03 shamanism, Freemasonry and Catholicism episode 160
  • BOOK REVIEW: Lisa Goldstein’s Walking The Labyrinth & 2014 Year-end

    Collect your free Wish Tag at the Inn, and then stroll through the meadow below to hang your tag on a Wishing Tree before setting out on the meditative path that spirals for eleven circuits to the centre of the Labyrinth. There you can ring the bell to send your thoughts aloft.

    The exit path will return you to the perimeter. Over ft. The distance covered, if you include the two circling paths that surround the Labyrinth, is about one kilometer. The Story of the Kingsboro Labyrinth and Wishing Tree Walk Over ten years ago we plotted out a meditative labyrinth and mowed its circular path in our lower meadow. We named it the Kingsboro Labyrinth. Many of our guests also found the Walk a pleasant place to enjoy nature or to contemplate or pray.

    In we began inviting the public to experience the mystical powers of the Kingsboro Labyrinth Walk in much the same way as civilizations have done over the centuries in labyrinths created in other parts of the world.

    There is a distinction to be made between labyrinths and mazes. The earliest labyrinths, dating from the Bronze Age, or before, were unicursal, meaning having one path with no dead ends. You cannot get lost in a labyrinth. Mazes are multicursal, having many paths and can be traced back to the confusing hedge mazes or puzzles of fifteenth century country castles. So what is the purpose of a Labyrinth?

    In the Middle Ages labyrinths provided you with protection for walking and praying, leading to the modern concept of labyrinths offering a safe journey — peaceful, pensive, reflective or spiritual — along a path leading to a mystical central area or goal where you can make a Wish, or a personal pledge, vow or promise to a companion or to a higher authority.

    In the Kingsboro Labyrinth, to complete the mystical experience, you can Ring the Hummingbird Bell to send your thoughts aloft! Having attained your goal, you return by a shorter continuing exit path, to greet the outside world where your journey began with a feeling of satisfaction or renewal! Much has been written about labyrinths as a Google Search will quickly show! The Worldwide Labyrinth Locator database, jointly created by Veriditas and the Labyrinth Society contains around labyrinths including a few mazes in more than 80 different countries around the world.

    Labyrinths have figured in the folklore of early Britain and Europe, particularly in Scandinavia and the Baltic region. Others see it as an opportunity for exercise or a stylized romp for children. Whatever the purpose, the Kingsboro Labyrinth is also a means to enjoy and commune with nature. An Island attraction for everyone… The Singing Sands Inn welcomes all visitors who wish to experience the Kingsboro Labyrinth and Wishing Tree Walk, and the personal satisfaction it can offer, whether focusing the mind, inducing a peaceful state, assisting in emotional healing and confronting problems, praying, or simply having an enjoyable and invigorating walk.

    We appreciate maintenance donations in addition to the token admission fees collected at the entrance table. Please park and follow the guide-rope at the front of the Inn that will lead you to the lower meadow. Hours are normally 10 AM to 5 PM. We look forward to your Visit! Call Email: info singingsandsinn.

    Helping teens understand and defend Christianity. Helping parents train up their young in the faith. Walking a Labyrinth Exposed 03 shamanism, Freemasonry and Catholicism episode by Michael on August 10, Walking a Labyrinth Exposed 03 shamanism, Freemasonry and Catholicism episode Yesterday we discussed the fact that mystics, new agers and Wiccans practice walking a labyrinth.

    We asked the question, if walking a labyrinth has been practiced for years, by many pagan groups, never by Christians , why should we bring this practice into our churches?

    Today were going to look at more belief systems that utilize walking a labyrinth. Shamans walk labyrinths Shamanism uses the labyrinth in the same way as most labyrinth walkers. Native Americans walk labyrinths Native Americans refer to the labyrinth as the medicine wheel as well as the man in the maze. Hopi Indians see the labyrinth as a symbol for Mother Earth and use the labyrinth in ceremonies.

    As I mentioned yesterday, many Catholics will pray the Rosary as they are walking the labyrinth. To my knowledge, to be fair, I have not seen any official endorsement of this practice by the Roman Catholic Church.

    The influential esoteric author, 33 degree Freemason Manly P. During the initiation of a new Freemason, the initiate is led through a series of stations where he is given an esoteric lesson. After journeying throughout the lodge room the initiate is taken to the center of the room where an alter is set up.

    They are then instructed to say they seek the light illumination. New initiates, like the freemasons, would take a labyrinth like journey through their lodge. The order of the Eastern Star calls this pentagram a labyrinth during the ritual.

    Some of these churches are certainly questionable. We just looked at some of the different groups that walk labyrinths. All of these groups were walking labyrinths long before the church took the practice in. How can we possibly claim that God is blessing it? Deu When thou art come into the land which the LORD thy God giveth thee, thou shalt not learn to do after the abominations of those nations.

    Pro There is a way which seemeth right unto a man, but the end thereof are the ways of death. From this Rev. Join Youth Apologetics Training today as we learn more about detecting heresy in our churches. Tomorrow, we will look at how churches have taken in this pagan practice and are using it for worship. For more information.

    It indeed felt as if I was trying to Square what expected to be a Circle. Halving found, walked, reflected, and learned something about myself and taking with me design ideas for future Octagonal Labyrinths, through this previously elusive Labyrinth, I begin my departure. Here are some different views. This permanent version replaces the original, which was set into the grass inand was the work of Rev.

    Lynne McNaughton and Ginger Shaw. This modified design resembles in its pattern the stone labyrinth in the floor of Chartres Cathedral in France. Pavement or stone labyrinths are found in many twelfth century European cathedrals and churches.

    Labyrinths are frequently confused with mazes but serve a different purpose. A maze is a puzzle or game one attempts to solve.

    SFU ventures into spirituality with labyrinth

    The labyrinth, on the other hand, is meant to mirror the spiral patterns of creation and to draw one into reflection, contemplation, or prayer.

    It is a singular path that leads the participant to the centre and then back out again. Several religious traditions — Christian, Aboriginal, Eastern — have some form of walking meditation. The Maltese Labyrinth is open to all; please enjoy walking it at your own pace. A map is here look for the red arrow near the topand Google streetview is here. The Vancouver Sun story about this transaction is here. Walking a Labyrinth Exposed 03 shamanism, Freemasonry and Catholicism episode by Michael on August 10, Walking a Labyrinth Exposed 03 shamanism, Freemasonry and Catholicism episode Yesterday we discussed the fact that mystics, new agers and Wiccans practice walking a labyrinth.

    We asked the question, if walking a labyrinth has been practiced for years, by many pagan groups, never by Christianswhy should we bring this practice into our churches?

    Experience the Kingsboro Labyrinth – A Walk to Wish On!

    Today were going to look at more belief systems that utilize walking a labyrinth. Shamans walk labyrinths Shamanism uses the labyrinth in the same way as most labyrinth walkers. Native Americans walk labyrinths Native Americans refer to the labyrinth as the medicine wheel as well as the man in the maze. Hopi Indians see the labyrinth as a symbol for Mother Earth and use the labyrinth in ceremonies.

    Walking a Labyrinth Exposed 03 shamanism, Freemasonry and Catholicism episode 160

    As I mentioned yesterday, many Catholics will pray the Rosary as they are walking the labyrinth. To my knowledge, to be fair, I have not seen any official endorsement of this practice by the Roman Catholic Church. The influential esoteric author, 33 degree Freemason Manly P. During the initiation of a new Freemason, the initiate is led through a series of stations where he is given an esoteric lesson.

    After journeying throughout the lodge room the initiate is taken to the center of the room where an alter is set up. They are then instructed to say they seek the light illumination. New initiates, like the freemasons, would take a labyrinth like journey through their lodge.


    Walking the labyrinth eastern star