Al kataib video


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  • State Department Designates Two Senior Al-Shabaab Leaders as Terrorists
  • Al-Shabab fighters attack two Somali National Army bases
  • US has increased military intervention against al-Shabab
  • Al-Shabaab releases new videos documenting terror attacks

    August 19, Share Harakat al-Shabaab al-Mujahideen, commonly referred to as Al-Shabaab is a jihadist fundamentalist group based in East Africa and has been actively engaged in terror activities.

    Al-Shabaab continues to conduct attacks in Somalia to achieve its aims. Al-Kataib Media Foundation, the external media-department of the Somali Islamist group has been releasing videos documenting its terror activities.

    The 13th instalment of the series primarily featured the targeted ambush on a Hirshabelle regional state convoy carrying two regional MPs on 5th June Using automatic rifles and rocket-propelled grenades RPGs , Al-Shabaab stopped the convoy of several vehicles and killed Hilowle and Mukhtar, along with 10 of their uniformed bodyguards.

    After looting the captured vehicles, the militants set them on fire before withdrawing. The second part of the video showed Al-Shabaab storming and capturing an FGS checkpoint in the town of Qalimow in Shabeellaha Dhexe, located approximately 9 km from the Hirshabelle state capital of Jowhar in the same region, although the film misidentified Qalimow as being in the neighbouring Shabeellaha Hoose region.

    In the daytime attack, an unclear number of militants overran FGS positions and were shown chasing survivors into the surrounding countryside. The fourteenth instalment of the series was 6 minute 40 second in duration and showed an attack on FGS positions in the town of Diif in the Afmadow district of Jubbada Hoose region in the Jubaland regional state, near the Kenyan border.

    The exact date of the attack was not mentioned but security analysts contend that this footage may be of last May when there was intense fighting between FGS, Jubaland state, and Al-Shabaab forces in that area. The film showed at least two dozen Al-Shabaab militants, armed with automatic rifles and RPGs, storming Diif in broad daylight, using main roads to approach the town. The video ends with footage of daytime improvised-explosive device IED attacks by Al-Shabaab on FGS and Jubaland state forces and images of dead government soldiers and of the booty the militant group captured in Diif, including a Kenyan identity card in the name of Bishar Ahmed Sheikh, a member of the government forces in the town.

    These two videos are significant in understanding the modus operandi of Al-Shabaab. The footages clearly manifest the continued military as the intelligence capabilities of the terror group. Photo Credit : Shutterstock.

    Al Shabaab's First "News" Video: An Effort to Recruit Westerners and Expel Peacekeepers

    Photo by David Axe. Available at Flickr. The video appeared to have two main objectives. First, it sought to attract foreign militants — and especially Westerners — to its ranks. Specifically, it aimed to convince the international community that the peacekeeping force is destined to fail and not worth supporting. Speeches by al Shabaab leader Abu Zubair and senior deputy and spokesman Mukhtar Robow Ali followed this opening segment.

    In fact, the full broadcast included English and Arabic subtitles when the audio was not in one of those languages. The video appeared to have three target audiences; notably, none of those audiences were the Somali people. First, the usage of English and Arabic throughout the video suggests that al Shabaab sought to reach out to potential militants in the West and Middle East seeking to contribute to the al Qaeda-led global jihad against the West.

    The group has made a concerted effort since to attract foreign militants to Somalia. However, [we] lack the precious element of the foreign fighters. There are an insufficient number of non-Somali brothers. The al Shabaab video marks the most recent attempt in a trend of foreign terrorist organizations prioritizing the recruitment of Western militants to their ranks using sophisticated propaganda.

    The release of the broadcast comes almost exactly one month after al Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula released its first English-language magazine, which reflects the competition between international terror groups in recruiting Western militants — a valuable but limited resource. The second target audience of the broadcast appeared to be the people and governments of Uganda and Burundi English serves as the official language of Uganda.

    One powerful scene in the broadcast evoked memories of October , when cheering mobs dragged the mutilated bodies of American servicemen, who were in Somalia on a humanitarian mission, through the streets of Mogadishu. Ugandan and Burundian] soldiers have now received a well-deserved treatment, putting an end to the bright optimism that drove them here in the first place. The blackened bodies of your sons now serve as a spectacle to thousands of cheerful Muslims.

    20 Years After 9/11 – Why Islamic State’s Propaganda Hasn’t Overshadowed Al-Qaeda’s

    State Department Designates Two Senior Al-Shabaab Leaders as Terrorists

    In the daytime attack, an unclear number of militants overran FGS positions and were shown chasing survivors into the surrounding countryside. The fourteenth instalment of the series was 6 minute 40 second in duration and showed an attack on FGS positions in the town of Diif in the Afmadow district of Jubbada Hoose region in the Jubaland regional state, near the Kenyan border. The exact date of the attack was not mentioned but security analysts contend that this footage may be of last May when there was intense fighting between FGS, Jubaland state, and Al-Shabaab forces in that area.

    The film showed at least two dozen Al-Shabaab militants, armed with automatic rifles and RPGs, storming Diif in broad daylight, using main roads to approach the town. The video ends with footage of daytime improvised-explosive device IED attacks by Al-Shabaab on FGS and Jubaland state forces and images of dead government soldiers and of the booty the militant group captured in Diif, including a Kenyan identity card in the name of Bishar Ahmed Sheikh, a member of the government forces in the town.

    These two videos are significant in understanding the modus operandi of Al-Shabaab. The footages clearly manifest the continued military as the intelligence capabilities of the terror group.

    In fact, the full broadcast included English and Arabic subtitles when the audio was not in one of those languages.

    Al-Shabab fighters attack two Somali National Army bases

    The video appeared to have three target audiences; notably, none of those audiences were the Somali people. First, the usage of English and Arabic throughout the video suggests that al Shabaab sought to reach out to potential militants in the West and Middle East seeking to contribute to the al Qaeda-led global jihad against the West.

    The group has made a concerted effort since to attract foreign militants to Somalia. However, [we] lack the precious element of the foreign fighters.

    US has increased military intervention against al-Shabab

    There are an insufficient number of non-Somali brothers. The al Shabaab video marks the most recent attempt in a trend of foreign terrorist organizations prioritizing the recruitment of Western militants to their ranks using sophisticated propaganda.

    The release of the broadcast comes almost exactly one month after al Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula released its first English-language magazine, which reflects the competition between international terror groups in recruiting Western militants — a valuable but limited resource. The second target audience of the broadcast appeared to be the people and governments of Uganda and Burundi English serves as the official language of Uganda.


    Al kataib video