The forest video


  • The Enchanted Forest Video Gallery.
  • Video: The Forest Republic of Finland
  • Watch Forest Whitaker ‘Sing’ Bring Me the Horizon in Band’s New Video
  • The Creatures in Video Game ‘The Forest’ Are Absolutely Terrifying and We’re Not Okay With Them
  • collider.com
  • New Trailer for ‘Sons of The Forest’ Sees You Braving the Elements (And Cannibals)
  • The Enchanted Forest Video Gallery.

    In development for four years, The Forest originally started life when open world survival was next big thing. Now that everyone has moved on to the battle royale genre, many of these survival games are finally hitting version 1. Those with patience, and a love for the genre may find this to be a pretty exciting time, as games like The Forest and Subnautica are taking the open world survival genre and successfully adding a compelling story to discover along with the challenge of day to day survival.

    The Forest fully embraces its horror nature, and also like Subnautica, can be pretty scary. Image courtesy Endnight Games I vividly remember my first experience with the The Forest: I thought it was visually impressive at the time, and the premise was extremely exciting.

    You are flying in a commercial jet with your son, only to crash land in a forest. You wake up as a survivor only to see a creepy, primitive looking person taking your son away.

    Not only did I have to survive, I needed to get answers and to find my son. And there is, of course, the immediate danger of another visit from creepy tribal guy. Later, I found myself hanging and bound in their cave and discovered that creepy tribal guy belongs to a group of cannibal mutants pulled straight from the film The Descent. I somehow freed myself and fought my way out of the cave, killing cannibal creatures indiscriminately with my axe until I emerged, covered in blood, knowing I had something special on my hands.

    Image courtesy Endnight Games Like recently released survival game Subnautica, The Forest has a story with a beginning and end, featuring narrative bread crumbs that help to move the plot along. There are no waypoints on your HUD in The Forest holding your hand to the next major plot point, so you may find yourself searching repeatedly for the way to proceed. Image courtesy Endnight Games The Forest, at its core, is an open world survival game.

    That means worrying about things like hunger and thirst, as well as building shelter to save your progress and for safety. In survival games, making a safe place to rest is a matter of luxury, and a source of fun. While nighttime can be dangerous, hunting parties, monstrosities and other horrible things prowl the daytime as well. Since you will be beset upon day and night, the best defense is a sturdy wall, but you have a bunch of options at your disposal.

    You can build shelters big and small which also serves as a place to save your game as well as custom buildings, and tree houses that would suit a Wookiee.

    Image courtesy Endnight Games The way surviving works in The Forest relies heavily on shameless video game logic—with improbably fast building and an inventory that is impossibly large. While building a structure requires nothing more than placing its blueprint and adding materials to it, gathering those materials can take a really long time.

    Building in The Forest can be fun, but it can also be exceedingly tedious. Chopping down trees with most of the in-game axes can take a little bit of effort.

    Crafted items are also often more powerful than some of their commercially manufactured counterparts, you may discover. Image courtesy Endnight Games Hunting is simple. Often chasing down deer and clobbering them on the head suffices. Some animals and creatures are skinnable, and yield crafting supplies or, in some cases, you can wear their skin directly for a bit of armor. But once I got used to the system, I was able to use it with ease.

    Image courtesy Endnight Games Exploring the island is a treat, and can be simultaneously awesome and terrifying. Horror movie tropes abound as you come across camp sites whose inhabitants have come to grisly ends, and you stumble across the splayed and mutilated corpses of the other passengers and other unfortunate people that came before you. Not only are the scenes, settings and clues horrifying for their own reasons, the cannibal mutants themselves are both simultaneously horrible and amusing to fight.

    Instead of feeling bad for killing them, I reveled in hacking away at these laughing, screeching, barely human abominations as they climbed trees to leap over my walls or surrounded me as I was out hunting. You can eat them for sustenance, hack off their limbs to create effigies, or use their bones to make all sorts of tools, armor and other stuff.

    Image courtesy Endnight Games The Forest has extremely fun, yet extremely buggy co-op. Whether an item will be persistent, existent, shared or not within a play session is sometimes baffling to me. Items will inexplicably respawn, despawn, or just not work correctly while in multiplayer. But as buggy as the experience seemed to be, it was never broken, and often hassle-free. Image courtesy Endnight Games The Forest is a sometimes horrifying, sometimes tedious, but mostly fun survival game held together by a compelling story.

    The Forest is available now on Steam.

    Video: The Forest Republic of Finland

    What are you looking for? In , Campo Santo Studios, a young collective of seasoned video game developers, delivered a second-person experiential game.

    Credit: Campo Santo Studios Henry is a wildland fire lookout. Fire lookouts have been a long romanticized and a rapidly disappearing breed of conservationist. The disappearance of the wilderness lookout is due to technological advances and a better understanding of the value of fire to the health of our forests. However, the romance is understandable — being paid to live up high among the trees and mountains, waking up with the sun and a perfect view.

    Although there are very few actual fire lookouts left, many of the old lookout towers can be rented as wilderness retreats. There are few props and no omniscience for the player — you only have the information Henry does; this lifelike minimalism completes the immersion.

    This is refreshing in the world of video games in which first-person action is usually accompanied by a heads-up display with all manner of information the character has no way of knowing in order to make the game easier.

    Credit: Campo Santo Studios Like many great real-life hikes, the appeal mostly comes from the visual experience. The inspiration for the game design is none other than the earlyth-century promotional posters issued by the National Park Service NPS and the U. Forest Service. While the posters may have informed the style of the game, the substance is purely the American West.

    Some now volunteer for the NPS, others have become avid campers and outdoorsmen after spending years and years inside. Vanaman, who was born in Ireland, remarked on the loss of forests across Western Europe and why conservation is so important.

    Watch Forest Whitaker ‘Sing’ Bring Me the Horizon in Band’s New Video

    Credit: Campo Santo Studios Henry is a wildland fire lookout. Fire lookouts have been a long romanticized and a rapidly disappearing breed of conservationist. The disappearance of the wilderness lookout is due to technological advances and a better understanding of the value of fire to the health of our forests.

    However, the romance is understandable — being paid to live up high among the trees and mountains, waking up with the sun and a perfect view.

    Although there are very few actual fire lookouts left, many of the old lookout towers can be rented as wilderness retreats. There are few props and no omniscience for the player — you only have the information Henry does; this lifelike minimalism completes the immersion.

    The Creatures in Video Game ‘The Forest’ Are Absolutely Terrifying and We’re Not Okay With Them

    This is refreshing in the world of video games in which first-person action is usually accompanied by a heads-up display with all manner of information the character has no way of knowing in order to make the game easier.

    The result is a brutally refreshing approach to combat, as coming face to face with your attackers gives a constant, chilling spike of adrenaline. Crazed vagrants will feign injuries only to lash out when Ethan closes in, weaponize their environment, and retreat around corners to set up ambushes.

    For Ethan to survive, he must become that which hunts him.

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    And hunt him they will. Enemies will at times literally burst through drywall or ceiling panels in their hunt for Ethan. The player is in a constant state of vulnerability, only ever as safe as a well-timed block to counter an incoming swing of a pipe. Periodically, Ethan will stumble upon firearms though they are often anything but reliable.

    New Trailer for ‘Sons of The Forest’ Sees You Braving the Elements (And Cannibals)

    Most guns have less than a handful of shots or sometimes none at all. This lack of consistent ammo supply adds yet another layer of anxiety-inducing tension to combat, but more importantly, ensures the player never feels like a super-soldier.

    Inversely, the unpredictable nature of firearms allows for moments of immense empowerment when the player discovers a fully loaded one. This can quickly alter the course of sticky combat situations but comes at a cost. Had there been more emphasis on firearms, the persistent sense of being hunted would be lost. The limited and unreliable nature of guns allows the strength of its visceral melee combat to shine.


    The forest video