Filipino superstitious beliefs with scientific explanations


  • Global Storybook
  • 9 Superstitions Many Filipinos Still Believe
  • 8 Superstitious Beliefs That Have Logical Explanation
  • 5 Pinoy myths you probably grew up believing
  • 7 Filipino Dining Superstitions (And Where They Came From)
  • Global Storybook

    Let me share with you why ours is unique. How did these superstitious beliefs start? Our ancestors believed in many gods, animals, and spirits. Worship was done through a variety of ceremonies, sacrifices, and customs. However, as a result of a long history of colonization in the Philippines by Spain years to be exact , the religious beliefs have shifted from animism to Christianity. Still, superstitious beliefs or pamahiin continue to influence the daily lives of the Filipino people, from fortune, love, and marriage to family, illness, and death.

    No double weddings in the family! The belief is it will split the luck fortune between the two marriages and the death of a close relative.

    Always serve pancit noodles on birthdays. According to legend, the longer the noodles, the greater the yearning for long life. Hence, on every special occasion, there is always a pancit, which is a tradition we share with the Chinese. While Filipinos nowadays may joke and laugh about believing that this noodle dish gives long life, it is still a tradition at almost every birthday celebration. It is needed to remove the bad spirits from following you to your home.

    Another superstitious belief about wakes, if the funeral is held at your home, mirrors should be covered with fabric since the deceased may try to appear in them. One must also avoid looking at the mirror and brushing your hair throughout that time since these also bring bad luck.

    This is uttered aloud while out in nature, especially when going through the forests or trekking up mountains. Filipinos also believed that if you point your finger in a bushy area, the dwarf or elementals will get angry. After that, bad luck and poor health may follow. To remove the bad luck you must bite your index finger. When someone gives a wallet as a gift in the Philippines, it should always contain money.

    Even a few coins or paper notes in the wallet are sufficient to bring good luck. These are some common superstitious beliefs that are still existing nowadays.

    We Filipinos have a lot of beliefs and until now, we still believe in them. Maybe these superstitious beliefs are true or not, and it is still up to us whether we practice them or not. It is a good thing though that even though these superstitious beliefs have no scientific reason, the tradition continues to be passed on to the next generation, thus keeping our culture somewhat alive.

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    9 Superstitions Many Filipinos Still Believe

    This impact extends well beyond language and food and into the many superstitions that locals take to heart. With an Animist, pre-colonial past with likely Hindu-Buddhist influences , followed by a major conversion into Christianity, The Philippines claims ownership of a very interesting, diverse mix of beliefs. Most likely, upon reaching the top step, the chant will end with either oro or plata. This is because many Filipinos will go to great lengths to avoid ending in mata which denotes bad luck.

    The two preceding words on the other hand, obviously denote good fortune. Turn your plate when someone leaves in the middle of a meal When sitting at the dining table for a meal and someone gets up to leave before the rest of the group finishes, everybody left at the table should turn their plates to ensure safe travels for the person leaving. Another meal superstition though more loosely believed is that the table should not start being cleared while people are still eating.

    If this is done, it is believed that the last person left dining will live a lonely life. In the context of a wake, it means going elsewhere after attending the wake before heading home to shake off the spirit of the deceased lest it follows you home.

    Superstitions surrounding wakes are among the most widely practiced by Filipinos still today. Another is that the family of the deceased should not drop off visitors at the door upon saying goodbye as it symbolizes dropping them off at their own deaths.

    And, as for serving food at wakes be it heavy meals or light snacks at Filipino wakes is customary, visitors should not make the mistake of taking any home with them be it a small piece of candy , as it signifies inviting misfortune into your home. Another type of sukob advises against marriages within the same year as the death of an immediate family member. Pushing to do so is considered bad luck.

    Another wedding-related superstition is that the bride should never try on her dress before the big day. This is said to bring bad luck and cause the cancellation of the union. Serve pancit noodles at celebrations, especially birthdays This ever-present dish at Filipino gatherings is believed to represent long life. And while Filipinos today may joke and laugh about actually believing that this noodle dish is served for long life, it remains a staple at nearly every birthday feast.

    Respect the elementals Filipino folklore is rich with a variety of elementals, from giants smoking tobacco, to small, grumpy, old men living in anthills. Stories of these creatures fill the childhoods of many Filipino children, inciting both intrigue and fear.

    Many superstitions still surround the beliefs in such creatures today. These places are usually outdoors, such as anthills and Balete trees. Failure to do so and disturbing such creatures may lead to unexplained sickness that can only be cured by an albularyo folk healer. This is meant to counter any usog that may have happened otherwise.

    Blame your missing things on elves In the Philippines, there is an assumption that when items around the house go missing and reappear, this is caused by dwendes or playful elves. While mischievous, these little creatures are believed to be mostly harmless — aside from the type that take small children.

    8 Superstitious Beliefs That Have Logical Explanation

    The silk produced by spiders is used in many optical devices including laboratory instruments. And if you broke one, it was regularly someone important, such as the lord of the kingdom of the king or a high-ranking nobleman. And if you broke it, it was common that if they were un-forgiving, they would put you in jail, possibly for seven years.

    5 Pinoy myths you probably grew up believing

    TOSSING SALT The belief of tossing a pinch of salt over your left shoulder to get rid of bad luck come from the legend that the devil is always standing behind you, and throwing salt in his eye distracts him from causing trouble. Nowadays, most people only do this after spilling salt, which is thought to be bad luck because salt was an expensive commodity long ago and folklore linked it to unlucky omens in order to prevent wasteful behaviour.

    The expression comes from the ancient belief that good spirits lived in trees, so by knocking on something wooden, a person was calling on the spirits for protection. It is a good sign if you have big ears, because you will have a long life.

    Some people will come out While the ancient Chinese might have been able to predict eclipses, their explanation for them was based in lore. For example: 1. Log in. Babylonians placed substitute kings on the throne duringsubstitute kings on the throne during eclipses to protecteclipses to protect the real rulers. The meaning of this is, warns the Sunto leave Moon alone. Scientifically, eclipse occur when one celestial body is obscured by another especially the sun or a planetary satellite. The eclipses were seen as near misses at Ragnarok.

    Philippine beliefs and superstition have grown in number throughout the various regions and provinces in the country. It gets cold. The superstition here is that a solar eclipse is dangerous to pregnant women and their unborn children due to the harmful UV rays. It is needed to remove the bad spirits from following you to your home. Another superstitious belief about wakes, if the funeral is held at your home, mirrors should be covered with fabric since the deceased may try to appear in them.

    One must also avoid looking at the mirror and brushing your hair throughout that time since these also bring bad luck.

    7 Filipino Dining Superstitions (And Where They Came From)

    This is uttered aloud while out in nature, especially when going through the forests or trekking up mountains.

    Filipinos also believed that if you point your finger in a bushy area, the dwarf or elementals will get angry. After that, bad luck and poor health may follow. To remove the bad luck you must bite your index finger. When someone gives a wallet as a gift in the Philippines, it should always contain money.

    Even a few coins or paper notes in the wallet are sufficient to bring good luck.


    Filipino superstitious beliefs with scientific explanations