Woman slaughter chicken youtube


  • Slaughtering Chickens and How to Make Chicken Tinola
  • City Chicken a Polish-American Recipe
  • Freakonomics Radio Archive
  • Yes, there are turkeys for Thanksgiving - for a price
  • Meat is Magnificent: Water, Carbon, Methane & Nutrition
  • How to Cook an Old Rooster (or Hen!)
  • Slaughtering Chickens and How to Make Chicken Tinola

    So allow me to explain myself… For us a huge part of homesteading pretty much the 1 part, in fact is food production. Although we are animal-lovers, the main purpose behind us having cattle, chickens, pigs, and turkeys is so we can grow as much of our own food as possible. And I do have heartburn over the trend over turning chickens over to animal shelters when they pass their point of usefulness.

    Chickens past their prime were destined for the stew pot where Great-Grandma extracted every last bit of flavor out of the meat and bones. Enter Mr. Rooster We got Mr. I always kept an eye on him and his ginormous spurs the sharp appendages on his legs and watched him for any sign of aggression, especially around the kids. So, I was shocked when he attacked Prairie Boy, unprovoked, several weeks ago. I heard Prairie Boy whimper, and turned around just in time to witness the second round of Mr.

    Rooster spurring him and knocking him to the ground. Thankfully, he attacked from behind, and only made contact with the back of his head. There was gushing blood, but no deep wounds. I realize there is inherent risk anytime you have animals around children, and I accept that. Rooster had to go that and he was starting to terrorize the hens a bit…. Plus, I had heard promises of older chickens offering greater depth of flavor to stews and stocks, so I was eager to test the theory for myself.

    The Process Mr. After dispatching him and draining the blood, we dipped him in a pot of scalding water, which made the plucking process a breeze, and then proceed to gut and clean the carcass.

    The Prairie Kids hung out while we did the deed, and they took it all in stride. We explained the process while we worked, and Prairie Girl 4 years old asked a few questions about the feathers and the blood, and then lost interest and went off to play.

    So there I was… Holding a scrawny, tough old rooster carcass… And bound and determined that it was going in the pot. The key with any cut of tough meat is long, slow, and moist cooking.

    Although older birds are not ideal for roasting or frying, they make fabulous soups and stocks. More herbs, seasonings, and your choice of veggies onions, garlic, carrots, celery to make stock if desired Cover the bird loosely I used wax paper to allow the carcass to breathe—avoid plastic wrap and place in the fridge to age for days.

    This is a crucial step for an old bird, as the extended aging process allows the muscle fibers to relax and tenderize. After the aging process, place the bird in a large stock pot and cover it with water. Season if you like I tossed in some salt, pepper, rosemary, parsley, and an onion for good measure and cover. Simmer for hours. Remove the bird from the pot and allow it to cool so you can handle it comfortably. Remove all of the meat from the bones.

    I sampled the meat as I cut it up— although there were a few strips of dark meat that were extra rubbery I gave those pieces to the dogs , most of it was surprisingly tender! Just add the vegetables of your choice, noodles, and seasonings to taste, removing the bay leaves before you serve it. I followed the directions in the Ball Blue Book and used my pressure canner. Throw them back in a pot with a few more veggies and herbs to impart flavor , and boil them long and slow I shoot for hours to make mouth-watering chicken stock.

    Cooking up Mr. Mission accomplished! How to Cook an Old Rooster or Hen!

    City Chicken a Polish-American Recipe

    I still remember our conversations during your search for live chickens on twitter. I, too grew up with the sights of chickens being slaughtered and have always considered it normal. I applaud you Jun for writing this, Bravo! Pwede rin malunggay instead of sili leaves. At para sa mejo sweet na sabaw, ok din na may corn. One of the best Pinoy comfort food. You slaughter your own chicken!!!!!!! Your story is such a beautiful example of how we should treat animals, even before they are killed for food.

    I only wish you did not have to patronize such a sketchy market in order to purchase your hen. Sadly, I doubt your hen was treated well before you took him home. It is ironic that animal rights activists forced a likely well-meaning farmer out of their farmers markets. Jun Belen Thank you, Hillary, for your wonderful note. I understand. I was in touch with a sustainable poultry farm just outside the city but the deal to get a live meat bird fell through in the last minute.

    Again, thank you for leaving a note. My mom also adds corn in her tinola and nilaga. Additionally, a new CA law PC I am a huge supporter of pasture-raised chickens and eggs. I feel sorry that pasture-raised meat chickens are not available for purchase in the Bay Area. Slaughtering meat chickens for food is an important part of my culture and I think meat chickens can be made accessible in the city with proper rules and regulations.

    We already know from first-hand reports that people sometimes are very cruel to animals during sale, transport and slaughter, or have little regard for their suffering.

    There is no way to train people or monitor their slaughter methods. Neighbors may be traumatized by witnessing or hearing killings. Soulcocina I have never used chili leaves. Is there a particular variety of chile that yields the best leaves for cooking with?

    I guess I will just have to wait for the summer to try different chili leaves. You have no idea how excited I am to try this. Thanks for the tip. Great post here all together. I am glad that my son witnesses animals being slaughtered at home just chickens so far. He is on his way to being an experienced gastronaut like you Jun! Jun Belen Hey Roger, thank you for writing. I am excited that you are excited to try it!

    The leaves add a mildly bitter flavor to soups. You should really try it and let me know how it goes. So many options. Tony WOW! And mr. I will be visiting the Philippines soon…and look forward to trying many of the foods there! I am american..

    I grew up in the country on a farm.. My dad owned a commercial and custom slaughterhouse…and butchered for 50 years before he retired…. I think its very good and very important for people now days to learn and appreciate our meats and where it comes from….

    My wonderful lady is a teacher and in her mid twenties! I use to tease my babe about killing fresh ones for us sometimes…. But she is awesome and since I do live on a farm today too, says she will be happy to kill and prepare fresh ones on birthdays.. She does not kill them inside at the sink though…. You know…. Thanks and take care! Jennie Jun, I just stumbled upon your blog courtesy of Pinterest. My mother-in-law has taught me how to make tinola with green papaya and mulangay leaves from our yard.

    I love it! It has a more subtle flavor than when using the chili leaves which I find still add some spicy-ness. Hopefully I will be as adept at making them as my mother-in-law is. Also, congrats on your th post!

    Freakonomics Radio Archive

    We use a cone and a sharp knife, being upside down calms the bird and this way cuts off blood supply to the brain immediately, making it a quick and less traumatic death. Lori: Have everything ready outside. The first one is the hardest. We said we would not do it again.

    That was six months ago.

    Yes, there are turkeys for Thanksgiving - for a price

    We are now looking for the best meat hens to raise. Heather: When there is fear involved in the death of an animal, one can taste the adrenalin in the meat so keep your butchering away from the live animals.

    If you are not going to eat them or feed them to your animals, take them to the edge of your village for disposal. Sue: I mainly raise ducks and the plucking is easier if you put a splash of dish washing liquid in the hot water before dunking the birds.

    Easier on us too. Have large coolers with running water to cool them off immediately after gutting. John: My family had a chicken farm, so we butchered chickens — lots of chickens. The best and most humane way we found: Once you grab them, turn them upside down.

    Not only do they calm down, but they get faint after awhile. Tie the feet together, and hang them from a post. Since they are groggy at this point, the killing is not too traumatic for them or you — slit their throat, making the cut up and down, not across the throat.

    Dawn: Make sure your hatchet is sharp and your cone is secure.

    Meat is Magnificent: Water, Carbon, Methane & Nutrition

    Double check your area and tools before you start. Rebecca: It does take a while to get used to it, and good at it. I just use a large pair of kitchen shears for the initial strike. He is on his way to being an experienced gastronaut like you Jun! Jun Belen Hey Roger, thank you for writing. I am excited that you are excited to try it! The leaves add a mildly bitter flavor to soups. You should really try it and let me know how it goes. So many options. Tony WOW! And mr.

    I will be visiting the Philippines soon…and look forward to trying many of the foods there! I am american. I grew up in the country on a farm. My dad owned a commercial and custom slaughterhouse…and butchered for 50 years before he retired…. I think its very good and very important for people now days to learn and appreciate our meats and where it comes from….

    My wonderful lady is a teacher and in her mid twenties! I use to tease my babe about killing fresh ones for us sometimes…. But she is awesome and since I do live on a farm today too, says she will be happy to kill and prepare fresh ones on birthdays. She does not kill them inside at the sink though…. You know….

    The Prairie Kids hung out while we did the deed, and they took it all in stride. We explained the process while we worked, and Prairie Girl 4 years old asked a few questions about the feathers and the blood, and then lost interest and went off to play. So there I was… Holding a scrawny, tough old rooster carcass… And bound and determined that it was going in the pot. The key with any cut of tough meat is long, slow, and moist cooking.

    Although older birds are not ideal for roasting or frying, they make fabulous soups and stocks.

    How to Cook an Old Rooster (or Hen!)

    More herbs, seasonings, and your choice of veggies onions, garlic, carrots, celery to make stock if desired Cover the bird loosely I used wax paper to allow the carcass to breathe—avoid plastic wrap and place in the fridge to age for days.

    This is a crucial step for an old bird, as the extended aging process allows the muscle fibers to relax and tenderize.

    After the aging process, place the bird in a large stock pot and cover it with water. Season if you like I tossed in some salt, pepper, rosemary, parsley, and an onion for good measure and cover.

    Simmer for hours. Remove the bird from the pot and allow it to cool so you can handle it comfortably. Remove all of the meat from the bones.


    Woman slaughter chicken youtube